Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@katherinek)

Development of right ventricular-targeted therapies in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. A great increase in the treatment armamentarium has been noted for this rare disease in the past 20 years, with 12 new PAH-targeted therapies. Though these therapies do improve cardiac performance, this is most likely due to their primary ...more »

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66 net votes
75 up votes
9 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@bsachais)

Apheresis Medicine in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease

Despite advances in care, patients with sickle cell disease have significant morbidity and mortality. One challenge is the optimal use of simple vs exchange transfusion vs no transfusion when managing these patients. Simple transfusions lead to iron overload while exchange transfusions may expose patients to increase numbers of red blood cell units. The mechanism of benefit from transfusion (oxygen delivery vs marrow ...more »

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130 net votes
152 up votes
22 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@kevinfiscella)

Inflammation: what is the role of the blood microbiome?

Blood is not continuously sterile. Data from dental studies, blood donors, and random blood cultures document that "normal" human blood often harbors microbes. Sepsis only occurs when immunological regulatory systems fail. Growing evidence link subclinical, potentially transient bacteremia to cardiovascular and other diseases. Could many of the diseases associated with inflammatory markers represent either continuous ...more »

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15 net votes
25 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Research Opportunities in HLB to Facilitate Aging in Place

There is a need for greater evidence-based research over the next 5-10 years to reduce healthcare costs, reduce hospitalizations, and support older persons with significant heart, lung, blood, sleep conditions to remain in their private homes if feasible, if technology is utilized that fosters clinical and epidemiologic research.

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17 net votes
35 up votes
18 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@garrett.s.booth)

Nefarious substances in the US blood supply

Prescription and illicit drug is everpresent in the US, which can potentially result in controlled substances entering the US blood supply. Passive transfer of immune allergens is only anecdotally been reported as peanut allergens, fish allergens, and contrast material. However, US blood donors are only screened for a limited number of medications on the universal donor health questionnaire at time of collection. What, ...more »

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-11 net votes
6 up votes
17 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Role of the lymphatic system in heart, lung, blood, sleep health and diseases

What is the role of lymphatic system in normal function of the heart? Do dysfunctional lymphatics contribute to heart failure? Do lymphatics have a role in recovery after MI? It has been reported that lymphatic vasculature transport HDL during reverse cholesterol transfer. Do lymphatics have a role in atherosclerosis? What is the contribution of lymphatic system to asthma or COPD? Does the lymphatic system contribute ...more »

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50 net votes
77 up votes
27 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@katherinek)

Would patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) benefit from background anticoagulation in addition to their PAH-targe

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs. For several decades, oral anticoagulation has been recommended by some societies for patients with a specific form of PH called pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the evidence currently supporting this recommendation is very limited. To date, no prospective randomized clinical trial has been completed ...more »

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62 net votes
68 up votes
6 down votes
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