Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Comparison of CAC-based Strategy versus AHA/ACC Guidelines

There is a need for a randomized primary prevention trial comparing the effectiveness of cholesterol treatment strategies based on a high CAC score versus the AHA/ACC 10-year cardiovascular disease risk tool. Include cost-effectiveness as well as clinical effectiveness as endpoints.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Behavioral Science in Asthma Clinical Research

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan:

 

Will integration of behavior science in clinical research improve effectiveness of interventions for asthma associated with behavioral risk factors? 

Submitted by (@wheeze)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Lung Transplantation

Although the majority of lung recipients experience significant health improvement, they also frequently face serious symptom distress, impaired physical functioning and poor quality of life due to post-transplant morbidity, such as chronic rejection, infection and multiple side-effects of immunosuppression. a) Conduct clinical trials of interventions designed to maximize clinicians' support of patients' self-management ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Clinical Research for HIV/AIDS and HLB Health and Diseases

What HIV/AIDS-related clinical research can NHLBI support in the next 5-10 years on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of HIV-related heart, lung, and/or blood (HLB) diseases in adults and children to improve heart, lung, and blood health outcomes in HIV infections?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Interventions to Reduce Low-Value Care

In 2010, the IOM issued a report stating that waste accounted for 30% of health-care spending, or some $750 billion dollars annually, approximately 25 times the annual NIH budget. How can we address and avoid waste and low-value care? Like any complex problem, there are myriad causes and no simple solutions. Defensive medicine, financial incentives, and physician knowledge deficits all contribute and represent potential ...more »

Submitted by (@rollmanbl)

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