Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Addressing the population-level determinants of CVD

Atherosclerotic CVD is an epidemic disease that is determined primarily by the social and physical environments acting in part through risk factor distributions. To date most preventive efforts have been in the clinical setting, using medications for risk factors. As useful as this is, a much better solution is to deal with the behavioral contributors to risk and their social determinants, including strong destructive ...more »

Submitted by (@stephen.fortmann)

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22 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Should clinical primary prevention of ASCVD be guided by subclincal disease or estimated risk?

Current approaches to guiding use of clinical primary prevention interventions, e.g., statins and aspirin, are based on treating patients who exceed a specific risk threshold. The performance of risk estimation is good, but not outstanding, and results from clinical and population studies continue to support the value of new biomarkers. Given the widespread use of preventive therapies, the lack of untreated cohorts is ...more »

Submitted by (@david.goff)

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-3 net votes
6 up votes
9 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Community Collaborative Research Targeting Populations with CVD

In what ways can researchers better collaborate with community representatives from populations with high prevalence / morbidity / mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to enhance and sustain interventions and achieve improved health outcomes? How can a combination of health behaviors and risk factors be used to conduct community-engaged research to prevent and treat CVD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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15 net votes
25 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

A Program of Research in the Prevention of Chronic Heart Failure

There is a need to address chronic heart failure (HF) through improved identification of patients at risk for HF and of patients with pathological ventricular remodeling who have minimal evidence of clinical HF, and more focused and individualized pharmacologic and lifestyle treatments and monitoring of patients with HF risk. Approaches would include big data collection, omics, statistical modeling, and focused clinical ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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17 net votes
28 up votes
11 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Optimizing Cardiovasular (CV) Prevention Medicine Use

Heart attacks and strokes cause substantial morbidity and mortality, while implementation of cholesterol and other CV prevention guidelines remain low. Proposed NCQA on-statin in the last year among those with DM was 46% in national field testing, and about 75% in Kaiser Permanente (KP). KP has had some success overcoming barriers to statin, aspirin, and blood pressure medicine adherence. If the nation as a whole is ...more »

Submitted by (@ronald.d.scott)

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-11 net votes
3 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Studying Health in Addition to Disease

Why do some people stop smoking after a stroke or myocardial infarction, whereas others do not? What motivates people who adopt a healthier diet and exercise program during their lifetime or after a significant health event? How can we promote healthier lifestyle choices at all stages of life? How do we ensure equitable health promoting activities for minorities, vulnerable populations, and lower socio-economic status ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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135 net votes
176 up votes
41 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Basic understanding on the mechanisms of overeating

We have an in depth understanding of the effects nutrients and diet have on the development of chronic disease, yet very little research funding has gone to understanding the basic mechanisms of eating behavior and how to successful change diet. There are currently no study sections at NIH that specialize in nutrition and/or human eating behavior, and therefore proposals in this subject area get farmed out to other study ...more »

Submitted by (@klk370)

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-3 net votes
17 up votes
20 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The missing ingredient in diet and cardiovascular disease prevention research

Determining the dietary patterns and dietary constituents that are most effective in preventing cardiovascular disease events. In addition to the obvious challenge of limited resources, the challenge is overcoming the tension between desire for comparable data produced from low-cost tools and need for higher quality data. Many studies continue using low-cost self-reported diet assessment instruments that produce data ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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14 net votes
31 up votes
17 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Prevent the Development of COPD

What can be done to prevent the development of COPD in individuals at increased risk. Quitting smoking before the development of COPD can prevent COPD development. What can be done to prevent COPD for individuals with other identified ris factors

Submitted by (@jsullivan)

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15 net votes
18 up votes
3 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Cardiovascular risk and adverse event prediction & estimating net benefit in statin-treated individuals

Compelling Question: There is insufficient data to personalize the use of nonstatin or other preventive therapies in statin-treated patients. Equations could then be developed to predict CVD risk and to predict the risk of adverse events in statin-treated patients to guide intensification of therapy.

Submitted by (@jennifergrobinson)

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11 up votes
8 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Qigong and Tai Chi for Chronic Disease Prevention

Non-pharmacological interventions for pain and stress have gained tremendous momentum. Mind-Body Practice -- Qigong and Tai Chi -- are group based and inexpensive to implement. The evidence base suggests that these practices are safe and effective for a multitude of preventable chronic disorders.. THE QUESTION: Given safety and efficacy, should there be vigorous research on implementation of Qigong and Tai Chi and ...more »

Submitted by (@rogerjahnke)

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33 up votes
31 down votes
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