Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Design interventions to improve sleep hygiene

Inadequate sleep is associated with risk of obesity. Electronic media devices interfere with our ability to sleep well - they delay sleep, interrupt sleep, and affect sleep quality. However these devices are addictive and ubiquitous. Can we develop interventions to help people obtain adequate sleep?

Submitted by (@anna.adachimejia)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Role of the lymphatic system in heart, lung, blood, sleep health and diseases

What is the role of lymphatic system in normal function of the heart? Do dysfunctional lymphatics contribute to heart failure? Do lymphatics have a role in recovery after MI? It has been reported that lymphatic vasculature transport HDL during reverse cholesterol transfer. Do lymphatics have a role in atherosclerosis? What is the contribution of lymphatic system to asthma or COPD? Does the lymphatic system contribute ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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50 net votes
77 up votes
27 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Do our modern "traditional" sleep schedules defy nature?

Here's an interesting article which shows that the modern tradition of eight hours of unbroken sleep might actually be unnatural, and quite different from what our ancestors typically did: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-16964783 So, maybe the majority of our modern societies (even the people without recognized sleep disorders) are unwisely fighting against biology? Perhaps a lot of people's health issues, such as ...more »

Submitted by (@apollia112)

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5 net votes
23 up votes
18 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Paralysis must be better known to doctors, therapists, and the public

Sleep Paralysis (SP) is a very common (up to 40% of all people), yet little-known condition that is terrifying, and potentially traumatizing, especially to people who are unaware of this condition. It is critical that SP is better known by all doctors, therapists, and the public. Too many people are mistreated and misdiagnosed as psychotic or even demon possessed when they do not understand SP, or they hide the experience ...more »

Submitted by (@kendraz)

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10 net votes
15 up votes
5 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

Much of the current clinical research on sleep and circadian research depends on cohorts designed for other purposes. While this has been helpful, such studies have limitations. These limitations are related to availability of in-depth phenotyping data and questions as to whether individuals identified in population studies are equivalent to those who present clinically with specific disorders. These concerns could ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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126 net votes
186 up votes
60 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Understanding Individual Differences in Responses to Sleep Loss

Individuals differ substantially in their physiological, health, behavioral and cognitive responses to sleep loss. Although these differences represent a trait, individuals who are vulnerable in one domain may be resilient in another - few systematic relationships between physiological, long-term health, cognitive and subjective responses to sleep loss have been found. Moreover, within a given domain, vulnerability to ...more »

Submitted by (@hvd000)

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124 net votes
171 up votes
47 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improve ineffective treatments for circadian rhythm disorders

I have extreme delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD), a circadian rhythm disorder (CRD). I fall asleep at dawn and wake up early afternoon. My dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) is at 5:30 am. A normal person’s DLMO may be at 9 pm, for example. CRD treatment—prolonged bright light after temperature nadir, dark restriction/melatonin starting several hours before natural bedtime, darkness till temperature nadir—does not work ...more »

Submitted by (@susanpl)

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75 net votes
103 up votes
28 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Brief vs. teach-to-goal interventions in teaching patients with COPD to use inhalers

What is the comparative effectiveness of brief interventions to teach patients respiratory inhaler use (e.g., verbal and written instructions) vs. teach-to-goal interventions (brief interventions plus demonstration of correct technique, patient teach-back, feedback, and repeat instruction if needed) on respiratory inhaler technique and patient-reported outcomes (symptom frequency, activities of daily living, quality of ...more »

Submitted by (@jimandmarynelson)

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16 up votes
3 down votes
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