Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@echenum)

Advanced Models for Translational Cardiovascular Research and Drug Development

Although the study of the cardiovascular (CV) system has benefited significantly from the use of gene-targeted and transgenic mouse models, small rodents do not always accurately reflect human cardiovascular physiology. Many discoveries using mouse CVD models failed to translate into human applications.

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16 up votes
5 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@mariannes.clancy)

What is the effect of variant genes on AVM development in HHT

Natural genetic variation between individuals can influence the outcome of carrying an HHT mutation. Some gene variants may be protective while others may increase the risk of AVM or telangiectasis. By identifying the variant genes that alter risk of AVM may give clues to the molecular mechanisms of AVM formation and provide new drug targets

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1 net vote
1 up votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Submitted by (@urdesai)

How will we train younger generation of scientists with skils in understanding the glycans?

Recent results suggests that glycans play critical roles in human physiology and pathology. Understanding glycan protein interactions may lead to next generation of drugs. But limited research is being funded on understanding structure - function relationships on glycans. Likewise, we are training very few researchers in the glycosciences. More programs are needed to impart glycoscience knowledge at the undergraduate, ...more »

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-21 net votes
6 up votes
27 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Develop biomarker panel to predict CVD risk in -omics era

There is a need to utilize the vast data generated in -omics research to develop biomarker panels for better prediction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks. •Cardiovascular diseases develop over decades and different panels of markers may be required for different stages •Lead molecules as potential biomarkers need to be selected by a panel of experts •Standard procedures about sample preparation, data acquisition, ...more »

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7 net votes
14 up votes
7 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@psaty0)

What administrative changes might facilitate team science? Update peer-review and budget mechanisms for team science.

NIH peer-review methods were developed at a time when biomedical science was generally conducted by individual investigators. Approaches to defining conflict of interest in peer review that worked well for individual investigators may not be fit for the review of large-scale collaborative projects. Similarly, the subcontract mechanisms are often slow and cumbersome at a time when projects need to be nimble and timely. ...more »

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54 net votes
74 up votes
20 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Better oversight and transparency for diversity in our research portfolio

There needs to be better oversight and transparency for diversity in our research portfolio to include a steady pipeline of young investigators and to facilitate the entry of pediatricians into the research work force. Specifically, workforce diversity should be considered in addition to scientific merit in determining funding priorities.

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1 net vote
1 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@pandrea)

Interactions between anticoagulant therapy and antiretroviral drugs

Cardiovascular pathology has become a major problem in the management of the HIV-infected patient during the ART era. A large number of HIV patients will receive anticoagulants drugs for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. It is therefore critical to understand the interactions between antiretroviral therapy and anticoagulant therapy to safely treat HIV patients.

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2 net votes
5 up votes
3 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@mmarques)

The role of Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) in the prevention and treatment of rejection of heart and lung transplants

According to the ISHLT, more than 4,000 patients undergo a heart transplant each year, and almost 4,000 receive single or double lung transplants. Their prognosis depends heavily on the avoidance of rejection, which claims the majority of their lives. For heart transplant recipients, the median survival is 11 years, while for lung transplant recipients, it is approximately 5 years. The current most common anti-rejection ...more »

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80 net votes
102 up votes
22 down votes
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