Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@mario.delmar)

Is the current scoring system working? Should it be changed?

Score compression is a major problem for identifying the most meritorious applications. Compression is facilitated by the reduced availability of scoring alternatives for the reviewers. Why not increase the range of numbers that can be used for voting (e.g., use decimals in the scoring)?

Voting

-6 net votes
9 up votes
15 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@katherinek)

Would patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) benefit from background anticoagulation in addition to their PAH-targe

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs. For several decades, oral anticoagulation has been recommended by some societies for patients with a specific form of PH called pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the evidence currently supporting this recommendation is very limited. To date, no prospective randomized clinical trial has been completed ...more »

Voting

62 net votes
68 up votes
6 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@craighersh)

Precision medicine in non-malignant lung diseases

NIH has a major initiative in Precision Medicine, including whole genome sequencing. In contrast to cancer, mutations with large clinical effects are expected to be uncommon in most non-malignant chronic diseases, such as asthma and COPD. Other data types such as gene expression, biomarkers, and micro RNAs must be combined with clinical and imaging phenotyping to advance Precision medicine in non-malignant lung diseases. ...more »

Voting

12 net votes
15 up votes
3 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@murry0)

Stem Cell Immunology

We now can create critical cell types like cardiomyocytes etc. from stem cells. Additionally, we are learning the rules of using these cells to rebuild tissues. A major gap in our knowledge relates to the immunobiology of these cells. Lessons from transplantation medicine are only partially applicable, because solid organs are more complex and likely more immunogenic than defined cell populations. How does the immune ...more »

Voting

23 net votes
45 up votes
22 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Glycans are critical for mammalian biology at a fundamental level

There is a pervasive view of glycobiology as a niche field that does not warrant significant attention. This is borne out of a profound ignorance. It is not an exaggeration to state that carbohydrates are just as important as proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. Dismissing the impact of glycans is like stating that proteins are not very important to biology, and their importance is seen in the lethality of many mutations ...more »

Voting

3 net votes
3 up votes
0 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Vasopressin layered on to norepinephrine treatment for septic shock

We know that vasopressin layered on to norepinephrine treatment for septic shock tends to produce better outcomes (VASST trial, Russell et al) than norepinephrine alone. We still need to know if norepinephrine should be first line or if vasopressin should be first line (and perhaps monotherapy) for septic shock.

Voting

1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@mschubert2)

Establishment of a permanent exercise study section

Funding opportunities explicitly for studies of exercise have not been a major NIH priority. The NHLBI has been an exception to this, but the non-existence of a true exercise study section still makes funding a challenge for individuals in the field of Exercise Science. Exercise, along with sleep and diet, is one of the pillars of health and has been shown to be highly beneficial for a number of medical conditions. However, ...more »

Voting

202 net votes
290 up votes
88 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@psaty0)

What types of questions are most likely to improve the health of the public? The importance of discovery science.

Congressional eagerness to see research funding translate into improvements in health care may make studies that address “how-to-deliver-care-questions” seem attractive. But the answers to “how–questions” are often so context dependent that the findings are neither generalizable nor durable. The answers to “how–questions” too often become obsolete when the health-care system, the electronic medical record, or the insurance ...more »

Voting

22 net votes
29 up votes
7 down votes
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