Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fibrosis Across Organs: Bringing Together Investigators of Fibrosis of the Heart, Lungs and Bone Marrow

Fibrosis can affect essentially any tissue or organ, including the heart, lungs and bone marrow. Effective anti-fibrotic therapy has long been elusive, and transplantation has been the only therapy capable of restoring patient function as fibrotic diseases progress to organ failure. Although these diseases present clinically with organ-specific manifestations, they are now thought to share many common pathogenetic mechanisms. ...more »

Submitted by (@amtager)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

New ideas from drug-induced cardiotoxicity

What are the fundamental mechanisms of drug, chemical, or biologics-induced cardiotoxicity (e.g., which proteins or signaling targets are most vulnerable)? Would such knowledge lead to understanding of the most critical signaling systems and contribute to development of new therapeutic (cardioprotective) strategies?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Funding for Hemostasis & Thrombosis Research

Thrombotic disorders, a result of the inappropriate activation of the hemostatic system, remain major causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Cancer, cardiovascular disease, trauma, and many of the other causes of death in the U.S. frequently culminate in a fatal thrombotic event. Notably, thromboembolic disease affects 500,000 people annually and leads to 100,000 deaths in the United States alone. Current ...more »

Submitted by (@abrams)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Recognition of bicuspid aortic valve's complexity, life threatening potential, and familial implications.

There is a persistent perception that bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common congenital heart defect (estimated to occur in up to 6 million Americans), is a benign condition that may not require treatment until later in life, if at all. The implications for other blood relatives, although referenced in medical literature, may not be acknowledged. This notion, coupled with the inability to identify those most at ...more »

Submitted by (@bavtad)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Reducing Atrial Fibrillation by treating modifiable risk factors

Would better management of modifiable risk factors, including obesity, sleep apnea, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and metabolic syndrome, reduce atrial fibrillation recurrence? Furthermore, what are the best methods to reduce the onset, hospitalization, and death due to atrial fibrillation, especially that associated with aging

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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