Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@craighersh)

Precision medicine in non-malignant lung diseases

NIH has a major initiative in Precision Medicine, including whole genome sequencing. In contrast to cancer, mutations with large clinical effects are expected to be uncommon in most non-malignant chronic diseases, such as asthma and COPD. Other data types such as gene expression, biomarkers, and micro RNAs must be combined with clinical and imaging phenotyping to advance Precision medicine in non-malignant lung diseases. ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@mariannes.clancy)

What is the Role of Macrophages in Pathogenesis of HHT

Alk 1 or Endoglin deficient endothelial cells promote recruitment of monocytes/macrophages and differentiation of them can play a critical role in development of arteriovenous malformations. Will targeting macrophage recruitment or activation instead of angiogenesis result in greater understanding leading to new therapeutic targets to control disease?

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@ckevil)

Gasotransmitter regulation of cardiovascular and lung health and disease

Gasotransmitters, such as nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen, have emerged as potent mediators of cardiovascular and lung cellular and molecular pathophysiology. While the physiological importance of these agents is becoming clearer, studies of gasotransmitters continue to suffer from several limitations such as formation, detection, metabolism, and molecular and cellular mechanistic insights. ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jlaakso)

Chronic stress and cardiovascular/metabolic disease

Chronic stress is a risk factor for obesity, cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, and stroke. Glucocorticoid hormones are elevated chronically in stressed conditions and are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. Despite strong evidence for this, non-pharmacologic therapies to reduce stress are not currently part of standard care for the prevention or treatment of metabolic ...more »

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