Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.
(@meaton)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Funding for Cardiothoracic Surgery Research

The continued development of new technologies requires cardiothoracic surgeons to maintain a strong level of research to ensure the highest quality of patient care and surgical outcomes are received across the world. The level of support for CT surgery within the NIH has continued to drop over the last decade. This is a substantial problem for the specialty as the limited funding available creates difficulty in the continued... more »

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105 net votes
155 up votes
50 down votes
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(@nareg.roubinian)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Anemia, oxygen delivery, and red blood cell transfusion

In neonatal, pediatric, and adult patients with critical illness, what is the best means to identify: (1) the degree to which anemia contributes to insufficient oxygen (O2) delivery and (2) the likelihood that O2 delivery will be improved by red blood cell (RBC) transfusion? These questions are most relevant to critically ill populations that exhibit unique physiology, including those with low cardiac output (cardiac... more »

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40 net votes
54 up votes
14 down votes
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(@greg.martin)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Diaphragmatic dysfunction in critical illness

Diaphragmatic dysfunction occurs more frequently than clinically recognized in the setting of acute critical illness or injury. This contributes to both incipient and prolonged respiratory failure, as well as the growth of long-term acute care/rehab hospitalizations. We need a better understanding of the mechanisms of dysfunction as well as strategies to mitigate loss of diaphragmatic muscle mass, ultimately leading... more »

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-1 net votes
1 up votes
2 down votes
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(@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulmonary Vascular Diseases

Does anticoagulation with warfarin improve outcomes (time to clinical worsening, qualtiy of life, exercise capacity) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension treated with current oral/inhaled therapies? There are substantial "unknowns" and practice variation in anticoagulation in PAH. Resource utilization is also a factor here. We may either be helping patients (or hurting them with side effects) by using anticoagulation.... more »

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2 net votes
2 up votes
0 down votes
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(@hongw0)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

2. Mechanism and target identification for abnormal epigenetic regulation in cardiovascular disease

Abnormal epigenetic modification has been implicated in human disease. Epigenetic therapy using nonspecific inhibitors for histone acetylation and DNA methylation has been proved effective in some cancer. However, because histone acetylation and DNA methylation are essential biochemical modification of life process, globally suppression on these process would have severe adverse effect. Identification of specific mechanism... more »

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34 net votes
34 up votes
0 down votes
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(@stephen.fortmann)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Testing PCSK9 Inhibitors

Several inhibitors of PCSK9 are in phase 3 development and show considerable promise for improving the lipid profile; they will be especially appropriate for patients with Familial Hypercholesterolemia and those with statin intolerance. The sponsoring pharmaceutical companies need to complete CVD endpoint trials with full safety testing. However, there may well be more than one drug approved for marketing. The sponsors... more »

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1 net vote
4 up votes
3 down votes
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(@wheeze)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Behavioral Science in Asthma Clinical Research

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan:

 

Will integration of behavior science in clinical research improve effectiveness of interventions for asthma associated with behavioral risk factors? 

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-5 net votes
8 up votes
13 down votes
Active
(@bavtad)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Recognition of bicuspid aortic valve's complexity, life threatening potential, and familial implications.

There is a persistent perception that bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common congenital heart defect (estimated to occur in up to 6 million Americans), is a benign condition that may not require treatment until later in life, if at all. The implications for other blood relatives, although referenced in medical literature, may not be acknowledged. This notion, coupled with the inability to identify those most at... more »

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1 net vote
12 up votes
11 down votes
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(@jnoel0)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

SLEEP DISORDERS AS A MODIFIABLE RISK FACTOR FOR CHRONIC DISEASE

There is developing evidence that sleep disorders, in particular obstructive sleep apnea and inadequate sleep, can influence the course of other chronic diseases. Observational studies show that CPAP treatment of patients with pre-diabetes who have OSA reduces the incidence of future diabetes. Moreover, animal and human data indicate that insufficient sleep and sleep apnea can affect the rate of progression of neurodegenerative... more »

Voting

156 net votes
211 up votes
55 down votes
Active
(@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Research

There is a need to enhance research efficiency for physical activity and sedentary behavior research by facilitating standardization of the definition of sedentary behavior; employing research strategies that support reliable, valid, and efficient ways to measure and analyze sedentary behaviors; supporting better approaches for data harmonization to promote comparability across studies; and facilitating the use of platforms... more »

Voting

44 net votes
75 up votes
31 down votes
Active
(@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

US-based Clinical Development of Innovative Medical Devices

Though innovative medical devices are often conceived of and developed in the US, US consumers are frequently the last to benefit. Innovators frequently go to market first in Europe and are now moving toward emerging countries, delaying the medical benefits available to the US population. Can the NHLBI and FDA’s CDRH, working together as sister agencies, develop strategies such as funding opportunities or collaborative... more »

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4 net votes
19 up votes
15 down votes
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(@skrenrich)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Clinical Trials & Duplicative Regulatory Standards

The initiation of clinical trials remains difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Repetitive institutional review board oversight is one of several obstacles to efficient clinical trial initiation and completion. New strategies for addressing duplicative regulatory standards are necessary to ease the initiation and completion of trials.

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5 net votes
6 up votes
1 down votes
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(@jnoel0)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

HEALTH CARE DISPARITIES IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF COMMON SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is evidence of a higher prevalence of sleep and circadian disorders in different ethnic groups. This is true for both adult and pediatric subjects. There is also evidence that minority populations in lower socioeconomic groups do not seek evaluation for sleep disorders as frequently as other segments of our population. There is also evidence that they are less adherent to treatments such as nasal CPAP for obstructive... more »

Voting

118 net votes
163 up votes
45 down votes
Active
(@jdhutcheson)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Discovering unique targets to treat and cure calcific aortic valve disease

Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major contributor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. No therapeutic strategies currently exist to prevent or treat CAVD. The aortic valve represents a unique and highly dynamic tissue, and it is important to recognize that although CAVD shares many commonalities with atherosclerosis, traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic plaque development remain relatively poor... more »

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28 net votes
33 up votes
5 down votes
Active