Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

SLEEP DISORDERS AS A MODIFIABLE RISK FACTOR FOR CHRONIC DISEASE

There is developing evidence that sleep disorders, in particular obstructive sleep apnea and inadequate sleep, can influence the course of other chronic diseases. Observational studies show that CPAP treatment of patients with pre-diabetes who have OSA reduces the incidence of future diabetes. Moreover, animal and human data indicate that insufficient sleep and sleep apnea can affect the rate of progression of neurodegenerative ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the Role of Macrophages in Pathogenesis of HHT

Alk 1 or Endoglin deficient endothelial cells promote recruitment of monocytes/macrophages and differentiation of them can play a critical role in development of arteriovenous malformations. Will targeting macrophage recruitment or activation instead of angiogenesis result in greater understanding leading to new therapeutic targets to control disease?

Submitted by (@mariannes.clancy)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Reducing the toxicity and morbidity of blood transfusions

Transfusion is the most commonly prescribed inpatient procedure. Blood transfusions have been shown in randomized trials to predispose to novel side effects. These include nosocomial infection, multi-organ failure, thrombosis and mortality due to these causes. Even in an era of more restrictive transfusion, there is an urgent need to understand and mitigate the mechanism(s) of these effects. Some patients will always ...more »

Submitted by (@neilblumberg)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Symptom management in sickle cell

Symptom management is a significant challenge for individuals living with sickle cell. In most cases, sickle cell research in symptom management focuses on pain. Although important, many other symptoms such a fatigue, anxiety, and depression need to be identified and intervened on to improve the quality of life for individuals living with sickle cell disease.

Submitted by (@coretta.jenerette)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sublingual Immunotherapy for Treatment of Asthma

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan: What role should sublingual immunotherapy play in the treatment of asthma?


Submitted by (@wheeze)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the role of diet and nutrition in treatment, management and prevention of Heart Failure?

Heart Failure (HF) remains a major public health burden. A working group was convened by NHLBI and ODS in June, 2013 to address the role of diet and nutrition in management of HF. A review of existing evidence produced no clear rationale for appropriate dietary interventions. On the contrary, the group developed recommendations for conducting additional research specifically on the role of sodium, fluid, nutrients, and ...more »

Submitted by (@lvanhorn)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Vasopressin layered on to norepinephrine treatment for septic shock

We know that vasopressin layered on to norepinephrine treatment for septic shock tends to produce better outcomes (VASST trial, Russell et al) than norepinephrine alone. We still need to know if norepinephrine should be first line or if vasopressin should be first line (and perhaps monotherapy) for septic shock.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Long-term pulmonary function in survivors of critical illness

Pulmonary function is known to suffer during the early recovery phases from critical illness, but the long-term patterns of recovery and associated consequences are uncertain. In addition, the clinical and molecular determinants of progressive deterioration or recovery of pulmonary function remain unknown.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

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