Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Persistent Burden of HIV Infection on Lung Health in the U.S. and Globally

Despite the advent of HAART the lung and vascular compartment continue to bear the brunt of complications associated with HIV infection. Potential causes include the establishment of HIV latency in the lung, inability of current therapeutic agents to treat latent reservoirs, inadequate immune reconstitution in the lung, and persistent impairment of normal lung homeostasis after treatment (i.e. persistent alterations ...more »

Submitted by (@htwig0)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fibrosis Care Center Network and Patient Registry

Complex diseases such as interstitial lung disease and pulmonary fibrosis requires a collaborative effort to effectively characterize, appropriately diagnose, and efficient evaluate novel therapies. Similarly, basic, translational and clinical research in this field requires the integration of clinical phenotypes with biologic specimens. We propose the expanded development of the Care Center Network and Patient Registry ...more »

Submitted by (@gcosgrove)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Molecular determinants of pulmonary failure in sepsis

Respiratory failure in sepsis is almost universal and leads to worse clinical outcomes, yet it is poorly understood. Recent epidemics of pulmonary failure from respiratory viruses (e.g. influenza, SARS, MERS, etc) makes understanding molecular determinants of respiratory failure and the associated inflammatory and physiologic responses, critical for improving the health of our nation and potentially mitigating future ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Contribution of non-lipid factors to atherosclerotic vascular disease

Despite the generally accepted thesis linking lipids to atherosclerosis, a large number of patients fail to benefit from statins, the current lipid-lowering drugs of choice. Moreover statins are reported to cause diabetes and severe muscle weakness in some patients thus adding to the general conundrum associated with statin therapy. This prompts an important, yet unresolved question related to non-lipid factors contributing ...more »

Submitted by (@priyaraman)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Benefits of intraosseous access on outcomes from OHCA

Vascular access is a challenge in the setting of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The failure of medications to impact outcomes may be in part related to the delay in drug delivery from the IV route. EMS systems have adopted intraosseous (IO) access but it is not clear if these are affecting outcome and there has been no large RCT. The current IO access devices are expensive and use different routes (sternal, tibia, ...more »

Submitted by (@dayam0)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Chronic stress and cardiovascular/metabolic disease

Chronic stress is a risk factor for obesity, cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, and stroke. Glucocorticoid hormones are elevated chronically in stressed conditions and are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. Despite strong evidence for this, non-pharmacologic therapies to reduce stress are not currently part of standard care for the prevention or treatment of metabolic ...more »

Submitted by (@jlaakso)

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