Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Challenge

Genetic or biologic makers that predict outcomes in pulmonary fibrosis are needed.

Validated animal models of lung fibrosis that better resemble the human condition are needed to speed up the drug development process.

An international patient registry is needed to help promote understanding of the natural history of pulmonary fibrosis and real-world impacts of interventions.

Submitted by (@swigrisj)

Voting

1 net vote
6 up votes
5 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Persistent Burden of HIV Infection on Lung Health in the U.S. and Globally

Despite the advent of HAART the lung and vascular compartment continue to bear the brunt of complications associated with HIV infection. Potential causes include the establishment of HIV latency in the lung, inability of current therapeutic agents to treat latent reservoirs, inadequate immune reconstitution in the lung, and persistent impairment of normal lung homeostasis after treatment (i.e. persistent alterations ...more »

Submitted by (@htwig0)

Voting

-14 net votes
8 up votes
22 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Paralysis must be better known to doctors, therapists, and the public

Sleep Paralysis (SP) is a very common (up to 40% of all people), yet little-known condition that is terrifying, and potentially traumatizing, especially to people who are unaware of this condition. It is critical that SP is better known by all doctors, therapists, and the public. Too many people are mistreated and misdiagnosed as psychotic or even demon possessed when they do not understand SP, or they hide the experience ...more »

Submitted by (@kendraz)

Voting

10 net votes
15 up votes
5 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What types of questions are most likely to improve the health of the public? The importance of discovery science.

Congressional eagerness to see research funding translate into improvements in health care may make studies that address “how-to-deliver-care-questions” seem attractive. But the answers to “how–questions” are often so context dependent that the findings are neither generalizable nor durable. The answers to “how–questions” too often become obsolete when the health-care system, the electronic medical record, or the insurance ...more »

Submitted by (@psaty0)

Voting

22 net votes
29 up votes
7 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Stem Cell Immunology

We now can create critical cell types like cardiomyocytes etc. from stem cells. Additionally, we are learning the rules of using these cells to rebuild tissues. A major gap in our knowledge relates to the immunobiology of these cells. Lessons from transplantation medicine are only partially applicable, because solid organs are more complex and likely more immunogenic than defined cell populations. How does the immune ...more »

Submitted by (@murry0)

Voting

23 net votes
45 up votes
22 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Non-obstructive Coronary Disease

It is increasingly apparent that ischemic heart disease does not equal obstructive coronary disease. There is a large, heterogeneous population of individuals who present to the ED with chest pain syndrome with or without a troponin elevation, who on diagnostic evaluation have non-obstructive disease and who on prospective studies have increased risk for ACS and early mortality; other literature shows the same for coronary ...more »

Submitted by (@matthew.burg)

Voting

34 net votes
52 up votes
18 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the role of chronic inflammation in lung complications in the HAART era?

With the advent of HAART HIV-infected subjects are living longer. Lung infectious complications so common in the early stages of the HIV epidemic have been replaced by those associated with chronic inflammation (COPD, pulmonary hypertension, lung cancer). Furthermore, this chronic inflammation is likely contributing to premature vascular complications (i.e coronary disease) seen in this population. All of these complications ...more »

Submitted by (@htwig0)

Voting

1 net vote
19 up votes
18 down votes
Active