Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.
(@nareg.roubinian)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Anemia, oxygen delivery, and red blood cell transfusion

In neonatal, pediatric, and adult patients with critical illness, what is the best means to identify: (1) the degree to which anemia contributes to insufficient oxygen (O2) delivery and (2) the likelihood that O2 delivery will be improved by red blood cell (RBC) transfusion? These questions are most relevant to critically ill populations that exhibit unique physiology, including those with low cardiac output (cardiac ...more »

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40 net votes
54 up votes
14 down votes
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(@john.alcorn)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Impact of Successive Acute Lung Injury on Subsequent Challenge

A great deal of focus has been placed on understanding chronic lung diseases such as asthma and CF. Long term changes in inflammatory and epithelial processes are well documented in this area. However, less research has addressed the impact of successive pulmonary injuries and how these seemingly acute events shape the lung response. This is the crux of the multi-hit theory regarding interstitial lung disease. Many acute ...more »

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-10 net votes
4 up votes
14 down votes
Active
(@hashmi.shahrukh)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sickle Cell anemia and Aplastic anemia survivors: Late effects and quality of life issues in Stem Cell Transplant Survivors

Most of the patients suffering from non-malignant hematologic conditions are cured of the original disease with Hematopoitec Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) but still their survival is less compared to age matched general population, and additionally they suffer from unique complications of HSCT culminating into a variety of late physical, psychologic, financial, and social complications (“late effects”). Considerable improvements ...more »

Voting

71 net votes
89 up votes
18 down votes
Active
(@moshe.arditi)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

More funding for Kawasaki Disease Vasculitis

Kawasaki Disease is the most common cause of acquired heart disease among children and we just started to understand that Kawasaki Disease 9 unrecognized during childhood) maybe responsible for a large number of adult atherosclerotic diseases and excellent animal models for this vasculitis exist and more funding should be allocated for this disease. We are now starting to understand that Kawasaki Disease is NOT a self ...more »

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2 net votes
2 up votes
0 down votes
Active
(@hloree)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Devices for Immediate and Complete Peripheral Artery Occlusion

Approximately 50,000 peripheral artery embolization procedures are performed annually in the U.S. for a variety of clinical indications including stopping life-threatening bleeding; reducing blood flow to cancerous tumors; and diverting blood away from arterial aneurysms, arteriovenous fistulas, and other vascular malformations. Most of these procedures involve the endovascular implantation of wire coils or wire mesh ...more »

Voting

-8 net votes
4 up votes
12 down votes
Active
(@jdhutcheson)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Discovering unique targets to treat and cure calcific aortic valve disease

Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major contributor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. No therapeutic strategies currently exist to prevent or treat CAVD. The aortic valve represents a unique and highly dynamic tissue, and it is important to recognize that although CAVD shares many commonalities with atherosclerosis, traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic plaque development remain relatively poor ...more »

Voting

28 net votes
33 up votes
5 down votes
Active
(@bavtad)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Recognition of bicuspid aortic valve's complexity, life threatening potential, and familial implications.

There is a persistent perception that bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common congenital heart defect (estimated to occur in up to 6 million Americans), is a benign condition that may not require treatment until later in life, if at all. The implications for other blood relatives, although referenced in medical literature, may not be acknowledged. This notion, coupled with the inability to identify those most at ...more »

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1 net vote
12 up votes
11 down votes
Active
(@missyophd)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Celiac and Gluten Sensitivity Research

Celiac disease is estimated to effect at least 1% of the population, is a burden on patients & the medical profession & can result in co-morbidities such as cancer, but awareness low--most patients endure a host of health problems for a lifetime unless they are lucky enough to get an early diagnosis. Gluten sensitivity, which can cause many of the same debilitating symptoms, does not have a test, & is also common in the ...more »

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-7 net votes
4 up votes
11 down votes
Active
(@hongw0)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

International collaboration for genetic and metabolic research on specific human population

During recent years, clinical research including well-organized randomized clinical trials in developed countries generated large database and human biological sample banks. These are valuable resources for human disease research. Mechanisms to encourage and facilitate international collaboration for genetic and metabolic research using database and human biological samples from specific human disease population of international ...more »

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4 net votes
4 up votes
0 down votes
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