Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Reduce the immunological burden of Heart Transplantation.

The research in the field of heart transplantation is importantly targeted to minimization of the undue toxicity of immunosuppressive regimens. This practice is limited by the natural tendency to develop chronic and humoral rejection if immunosuppression is too low. Allocation of organs in Heart Transplantation (HTx) is traditionally limited by the logistic of donation (Cold Ischemic Time) and by the urgency of recipients. ...more »

Submitted by (@camarell)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sickle Cell anemia and Aplastic anemia survivors: Late effects and quality of life issues in Stem Cell Transplant Survivors

Most of the patients suffering from non-malignant hematologic conditions are cured of the original disease with Hematopoitec Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) but still their survival is less compared to age matched general population, and additionally they suffer from unique complications of HSCT culminating into a variety of late physical, psychologic, financial, and social complications (“late effects”). Considerable improvements ...more »

Submitted by (@hashmi.shahrukh)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Controversies exist regarding thoracic aortic disease imaging

Controversies exist regarding aortic disease imaging (the aorta as well as the aortic valve, including characterization in the presence of a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV)). Many imaging approaches are optimized for evaluation of coronary artery disease rather than aortic disease. Without accurate characterization, the degree of disease progression may be under estimated, patient symptoms may be discounted, and those who ...more »

Submitted by (@bavtad)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Diaphragmatic dysfunction in critical illness

Diaphragmatic dysfunction occurs more frequently than clinically recognized in the setting of acute critical illness or injury. This contributes to both incipient and prolonged respiratory failure, as well as the growth of long-term acute care/rehab hospitalizations. We need a better understanding of the mechanisms of dysfunction as well as strategies to mitigate loss of diaphragmatic muscle mass, ultimately leading ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

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