Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

To facilitate innovation and accelerate research translation, knowledge dissemination, and implementation science that enhances public health.

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Increased assessment of the quality, integrity, and rigor of research and research reporting

In an effort to increase the quality, integrity, and rigor of research and research reporting, setting up systems for quantifying these factors across time can be accomplished. These are areas of research that can provide the field with useful feedback and serve as a basis for monitoring progress across time, journals, topics, and other factors. Hence, we propose funding the collection and publication of such monitoring ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Screening the work force for genetic arrhythmias

Is anyone in your family at risk for a potentially lethal genetic arrhythmia? 4000 young people die each year because they bear a genetic mutation that makes them susceptible to a sudden fatal arrhythmia. The symptoms are easy to identify and awareness of these symptoms would help unsuspecting families.

 

It is estimated that one of these syndromes (LQTS) is 3 times more common in the US than childhood leukemia.

Submitted by (@andygolden)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Direct Upregulation of Antioxidant Defenses as a Therapeutic Strategy

Clinical trials involving administration of antioxidants such as vitamin C or vitamin E as therapeutic strategies for cardiovascular diseases associated with oxidant stress have proven to be surprisingly disappointing. A particularly attractive alternative approach is direct upregulation of endogenous antioxidant defenses such as NRF2 via dietary approaches. NRF2 is a master antioxidant and cell protective transcription ...more »

Submitted by (@jlombard)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

The Investigator's Catch-22: How Can NHLBI Help?

The Critical Challenge is to determine how NHLBI can continue to foster the translational research necessary to allow our researchers to further develop their NHLBI-funded basic science discoveries. Researchers can't readily get a "typical" grant to perform the preclinical and early clinical translational IND-enabling research, and also can't yet attract private sector support without having done the work to "de-risk" ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Implementation Science to Improve Care in Sickle Cell Disease

There are approximately 100,000 individuals living with sickle cell disease in the US, however study after study has shown that many lack access to the few existing evidence based interventions such as hydroxyurea. We need to investigate novel ways to increase acess to hematology care and disease modifying therapies.

Submitted by (@amy.sobota)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Harnessing the ongoing ‘natural experiments’ of quality improvement

How do we harness the ongoing “natural experiments” of quality improvement (QI) activities in various healthcare systems to facilitate hypothesis-driven research, improve scientific validity to address questions in clinical trials, and implement and disseminate research results? • Current restrictions in human subjects research regulations • Diversity in approaches and methodology rigor to QI initiatives across different ...more »

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Deriving Cardiac Elements from Pluripotent Human embryonic Stem Cells for Heart Reconstitution

to date, the existing markets lack a clinically-suitable human cardiomyocyte source with adequate myocardium regenerative potential, which has been the major setback in developing safe and effective cell-based therapies for regenerating the damaged human heart in cardiovascular disease.

Submitted by (@xuejunparsons)

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