Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

To support the future of investigator-initiated research by sustaining and developing a diverse biomedical workforce with the skills and research resources to pursue emerging opportunities in science.

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Encouraging good science by maintinaing continuity of review

Challenge is to have revised grants reviewed by the same reviewers, rather than delayed by new sets of reviewers. Also, having points such as changing model species addressable through Program Staff rather than prolonged re-review.

Submitted by (@rlevine)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Faster advancement of science

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Not hard!

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5 net votes
5 up votes
0 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Sickle cell education for healthcare providers

Although sickle cell was first described more than 100 years ago and more than 100,000 individuals in the US are living with sickle cell disease, healthcare providers still lack basic knowledge of the key components in providing care for individuals with sickle cell. This often leads to poor health outcomes including stigmatization of patients with sickle cell seeking care. Evidenced-based curriculum should be available ...more »

Submitted by (@coretta.jenerette)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : International Association of Sickle Cell Nurses and Physician Assistants, Inc.

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18 net votes
21 up votes
3 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Expanding short term Junior Faculty Training Programs such as the Summer Training Programs for Junior Faculty (PRIDE): Focus

Expanding the base of the program foci (e.g. including NCI in addition to the current HLBS).

Submitted by (@treva0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Expanding the PRIDE program foci beyond NHLBI’s heart, lung, blood, and sleep foci, may involve a common-fund effort, for example by having multiple institutes involved in the program. It is well accepted that good research today is a collaborative effort that often reaches across institutes. For example, the research interests of several PRIDE/SIPID trainees were at the intersection of cardiology and areas such as cancer, diabetes and aging.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Treva Rice for the PRIDE (Programs to increase diversity among individuals engaged in health-related research): Joe GN “Skip” Garcia, Francisco Moreno Girardin Jean-Louis, Gbenga Ogedegbe, DC Rao, Victor Davila-Roman, Mohamed Boutjdir, Betty Pace, Juan Gonzales, Bettina M Beech, Keith Norris, Marino Bruce, Alicia Fernandez, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, and Margaret Handley.

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10 net votes
14 up votes
4 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Training the new generation: not all about “big data” & "omics"

How do we attract more students/trainees into fields that are not popularized by “catchy” names?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Training the next generation of scientists

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

While the need to train the next generation of scientists in emerging fields (e.g. “omics” and “big data”), we should not overlook the need for nurturing “old fashioned” scientists (e.g. physiologists, integrative biologists) which are on the decline.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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23 net votes
35 up votes
12 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Moderating Positive Feedback between Research Funding and PhD/postdoc Numbers

A critical challenge will be to limit future destabilizing expansion of the number of PhD students and postdoc trainees. Because 75-80% of biomedical PhD students and postdocs now supported by NIH are funded by RO1 and other research funding, if/when research grant budget increase the number of PhD and postdoc “slots” would automatically expand--even if there is no expectation of comparable increases in demand for ...more »

Submitted by (@teitelbaum)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Many including National Academies committees suggest that the 75-80% figure should be gradually reduced to around 50%, without increasing overall numbers, i.e. both limiting numbers supported under research grants and increasing numbers supported under training programs. Moderating the currently strong linkages of PhD/postdoc numbers to research funding should make future biomedical research careers more attractive than they have been in recent years.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Michael S. Teitelbaum

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5 net votes
15 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Promotion of interdisciplinary and team science by T-32 Institutional Training Grants.

Are T32s doing a sufficient job of promoting interdisciplinary and team science? Should we change the way these programs are structured?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

T-32 programs train few thousands junior biomedical scientists every year. Training grants that succeed in integrating multiple discipline will produce a workforce that is more attuned to the needs of modern medicine and will be more competitive in the job market of the 21st century.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Activities along this line can be implemented immediately by strongly encouraging the institutions to revise or re-design their training programs.

Interdisciplinary training has become a necessity in the present time; there is a strong interest in today’s medicine at looking at the patient in its entirety and at disease processes from all angles. This requires data integration and scientists that are familiar with the language of different disciplines and can ask scientific and medical questions that span these disciplines.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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25 net votes
37 up votes
12 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Developing/adapting training programs to address future areas of critical need

What are the best methods to identify future training areas and develop/adapt training and mentorship programs to address future critical needs?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

• Increased return on investment

• Cross-fertilization/cross pollinate with other ICs

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

High feasibility but may require pilot projects, marketing and dissemination

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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8 net votes
16 up votes
8 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

RO1 funding rate

I would like to suggest the following changes in RO1 funding: (1) Reduce the amount but maintain the duration of each RO1 award to make academic research labs SMALLER but BETTER - This will force PIs pay closer attention to experimental design, to improve the efficiency and accuracy. It may entice more PIs to do more experiments themselves, the best way to reduce errors, maintain consistency and keep in touch with the ...more »

Submitted by (@gtseng)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This is simple math: when the amount of money is reduced but the number of RO1 applications is not, we will see a drop in the RO1 funding rate. This is frustrating, especially when we question the validity of data from some high-profile labs that list 4 or even more RO1 awards in the 'Acknowledgments' of their papers in high-impact journals. By reducing the amount of RO1 award, NIH can fund more (smaller) labs. This may break the monopoly (or at least reduce the impact) of some big labs in key research areas. The increased participation of small labs highly motivated to answer MORE questions with LESS costs will help revitalize the US Biomedical Research Enterprise.

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-8 net votes
23 up votes
31 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Institutional Support for K applicants as they transition to independence

What can research institutions do to entice and support potential and actual K award applicants to become independent scientists?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The period between the end of the K award and the first R01 is a critical one wherein many trainees, with no financial support from their institutions, opt out of a science career and pursue other viable sources of income, such as in the clinics, in teaching, or in the private sector. An investment from their institution, either by way of bridge awards, protected time, or salary commitment will enable retention of these highly- trained individuals and ensure a vibrant research workforce in the years to come.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This type of activity can be initiated immediately by the private institutions as a way of motivating physician- scientists and other scientists to remain in the academe, and eventually reap the rewards by way of research awards that bring prestige and indirect costs back to the institution.

In an analysis of 132 NHLBI Division of Lung Diseases K08 grantees between FY2005-2011, only 52% applied for subsequent NIH grants, whereas 48% did not even try, suggesting more incentives should be given for them to stay within the biomedical research workforce. However, among the Early Stage Investigators (ESIs) funded in 2013, 58% had previous training grants, suggesting training grants give Research Project Grant (RPG) applicants a definite edge.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

74 net votes
102 up votes
28 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Training Mentors and Protégés to create a T4 translation pipeline

How can training of investigators (both mentors and trainees) be supported to create a T4 translation research pipeline?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

A robust global T4 translation research community would be developed that would help translate proven-effective interventions for use in populations for a positive health impact

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The NHLBI Global Health and Health Inequities Think Tanks identified T4 translation research as an important area that needs development in the very near future.

 

However, conducting high quality T4 research requires a research community focused in this area. Currently, very few researchers are working in this area. The T4 research community needs to be identified so capacity can be established for conducting T4 research. Incentives would need to be developed to maintain a robust global T4 research community.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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-7 net votes
6 up votes
13 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Expanding short term Junior Faculty Training Programs such as the Summer Training Programs for Junior Faculty (PRIDE): More Pgms

Expanding the training efforts (e.g. greater number of funded summer programs, extend training beyond 2 summers, provision for 5-year grants so an additional cohort can be included) would be highly beneficial.

Submitted by (@treva0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Expand training efforts by increasing number of programs. The PRIDE is now turning away outstanding applicants due to the limited number of training slots across the different program. Since each program is currently training as many scholars as is feasible given their current infrastructure and resources, a solution may include increasing the number of independent programs in the PRIDE or number of trainees a given program can support. This will lead to increasing the number of independent researchers in the health-related fields who come from diverse backgrounds. Flexibility to increase the training period: Some junior faculty need more assistance than others. Some trainees from less research-intensive institutions may have had fewer opportunities to participate in research and thus have less experience and fewer (sometimes no) publications. They would greatly benefit from an initial period dedicated to increasing core research skills and publications prior to proposing and seeking independent grant funds. In the long run, they will be more likely to succeed given the extended training since the PRIDE offers opportunities to collaborate with nationally known researchers and provides access to data resources and the possibility of increasing their publication record. Also, a small percentage of the slots may be reserved for repeat participation in structured manner that provides escalating levels of support.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Treva Rice for the PRIDE (Programs to increase diversity among individuals engaged in health-related research): Joe GN “Skip” Garcia, Francisco Moreno Girardin Jean-Louis, Gbenga Ogedegbe, DC Rao, Victor Davila-Roman, Mohamed Boutjdir, Betty Pace, Juan Gonzales, Bettina M Beech, Keith Norris, Marino Bruce, Alicia Fernandez, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, and Margaret Handley.

Voting

5 net votes
11 up votes
6 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Benefits to the US in funding global health research in LMICs

What are the benefits to the US in funding global health research in low-to-middle-income countries?

Submitted by (@tracywolbach)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The four leading NCDs are cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes. The most common risk factors are tobacco use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, and alcohol use. NCDs and risk factors are shared globally and offer many opportunities and benefits to US funders and academia, such as implementing treatments in under resourced populations that could benefit US under resourced populations; identifying effective treatment for diseases with low incidence and prevalence in the US; and expanding physician training by caring for patients with diseases in early stages that are not commonly seen in the US until they are quite advanced The United Nations recognized the NCD global burden and held a high-level meeting on NCDs September 19-20, 2011. NHLBI should consider increase funding of global collaborations between the US and LMICs to address this increasing global health burden. Funding for these collaborations would help merge the fields of communicable and non-communicable diseases and provide opportunities for HICs to adopt some of the successful health care interventions implemented in LMICs. NHLBI should also consider a strategy to better inform politicians and taxpayers about the importance and benefits of global NCD research and increase their funding for NCD programs at academic institutions to train young chronic disease professionals.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Nancy Dianis

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4 up votes
5 down votes
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