Goal 1: Promote Human Health

To expand knowledge of the molecular and physiological mechanisms governing the normal function of heart, lung, blood, and sleep systems as essential elements for sustaining human health.

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Rife Frequency Treatment

Ray Rife produced lists of frequencies, most within the sound spectrum that would cause viruses to resonate, explode and die. Do you have any ongoing research or use of his system?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Cures for many diseases, especially Cancer.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

I have already built a simple, working system.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Joseph C. Mullally

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-24 net votes
1 up votes
25 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Global cohorts to fill gaps in knowledge

Given the global burden of disease, what does NHLBI plan to do to establish a diverse global cohort to connect basic sciences to population health, in a way that differences in phenotypes around the world can be studied rapidly? For example, why not start by supporting a coalition of cohorts originally funded by the Global Heart Initiative?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

A big challenge is for global proposals to get through regular RO1 mechanisms, as the study sections tend to be US-centric. Issuing special RFAs for US institutions to collaborate with global partners and setting special study sections will help.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This should be feasible

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : K.M. Venkat Narayan

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-8 net votes
5 up votes
13 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Coordination for Cardiac Care: Centalized database and joint sessions

Most senior citizens see a number of doctors. Mostly, coordination among the physicians is limited. Less than perfect to say the least.

Why all the physicians taking care of a patient don't maintain a common central database as well as meet with the patient together- say once a year.

Submitted by (@abasit88)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Better coordination of the physicians and joint sessions with the patient will reduce the duplicity of scans and test. Collaborative approach will lead to more reliable outcomes for the patient and cut the cost of treatment

It will also reduce the incidences of duplicate and contradicting records maintained in the healthcare system.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Addressing the question of improved coordination among physicians treating a patient is not only feasible and cost effective but it is an absolutely essential step to reduce the healthcare cost, reduce medical errors and significantly improve the patient care.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ABDUL BASIT

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1 net vote
3 up votes
2 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

INVESTIGATE DIFFERENTIAL VULNERABILITY TO SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Studies in different subjects have shown that there are major individual differences in response to sleep loss and circadian disruption. Twin studies have shown that this is heritable. There needs to be an intensive effort to assess basis of these individual differences. This could include in-depth phenotyping studies, e.g., neuroimaging, genetic studies, “-omic” studies, epigenetic changes, etc.

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

There are major individual differences in response to sleep loss (both acute and chronic) and to circadian disruption. This has major impact both in terms of health consequences and in safety. Some individuals are particularly vulnerable to sleep loss and hence are more likely to have adverse consequences of losing sleep—increased risk of crashes, errors by physicians, etc. They are also more likely to be affected by metabolic and other consequences if they have chronic insufficient sleep.

 

Identifying the basis of these individual differences will have several impacts:

 

1. It will provide likely targets for development of biomarkers to assess effect of sleep loss and circadian disruption.

2. It will provide tools to risk stratify individuals and to employ preventative strategies to reduce risk of major adverse consequences.

3. It will identify novel pathways that could be the target for future intervention studies.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

These studies are highly feasible. Phenotyping and recruitment strategies to study this question have been established in many laboratories. Moreover, more laboratories are utilizing genetic, -omic approaches and epigenetic approaches that could be applied to this question. There is also a developing repertoire of neuroimaging studies that can be applied to address this question.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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155 net votes
213 up votes
58 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Investigating Co-Morbidities in Women's Cardiovascular Health

There are important questions related to the cardiovascular health of women, and particularly to diagnostic and therapeutic challenges arising from the common existence of co-morbid conditions. The latter consideration, as well as the limitations of the budgets of individual institutes and centers at the NIH, suggest that it may be reasonable for the NHLBI to consider cross-NIH collaborations with I/Cs that have related ...more »

Submitted by (@rosemarie.robertson)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Collaboration across I/Cs could encourage investigators or teams to explore new concepts underlying the etiology of common or rare cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including stroke, particularly those with gender-related differences. In addition, clinical research on these disorders would benefit from active consideration of the common co-morbidities seen in patients with CVD, especially as patients with these co-morbidities are often specifically excluded from clinical trials. Since the patients who will ultimately benefit from treatments developed will often suffer from multiple other disorders, the societal benefit would be substantial. While any single I/C could support such studies, collaborative funding would be likely to bring together new teams of investigators with novel ideas.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

We believe that there is likely to be a good response from investigators, both basic and clinical, to collaborative, multi-I/C RFAs. It might be of additional benefit to provide some funds specifically for teams that are newly collaborative in response to the RFAs, to encourage increased cross-field collaboration.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Rose Marie Robertson for American Heart Association

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3 net votes
3 up votes
0 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Simplify cancer survivor followup

Excellent work has been done by Childrens Oncology Group and Childhood Cancer survivor group and the late effects of cancer treatment ,especially in children but also young adults is an ongoing field of study. However protocols for follow up studies ,which should be done and how often and by whom are very complicated and hard to follow. My idea is to develop a simple, relatively inexpensive and user friendly,protocol ...more »

Submitted by (@churv0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The idea could and probably is being worked on by an interested group.

Putting the idea into practice is more difficult as these patients are followed by diverse practitioners,become lost to follow up and do not themselves realize the problems they may face

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Carole Hurvit

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4 net votes
10 up votes
6 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Trans-kingdom regulation of HLBS systems

What is the interplay of the micro- and macroenvironment and their effect on gene and protein expression and overall effect on phenotypes in HLBS systems?

 

Need for unbiased approaches for information capture. Technologies for capturing real time, dynamic and contextual information

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Increase and gain novel understanding of heart, lung, and blood physiologic systems

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Emerging technologies, databases and merging of disciplines in the context of big data has the potential to make this feasible in the next 5-10 years

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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-6 net votes
3 up votes
9 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Continued focus on mechanism of Red Cell Production

Recent murine studies and early phase clinical trials demonstrate that pharmacologic “traps” for TGF-beta family members may stimulate erythropoiesis in non-erythropoietin-dependent mechanisms. The molecular details of this process remain to be elucidated. Better understanding of this process, which may markedly decrease the marrow problem of “ineffective erythropoiesis,” may lead to improved therapies in thalassemia, ...more »

Submitted by (@gcioffi)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

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47 net votes
57 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Missing upper teeth & sleep apnea treatment: Problems?

I am a 73 year old female with Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis, Complex Sleep Neap, using oxygen @ 4-5 L/min 24/7 who just had my upper teeth extracted. I notice this has a negative effect, or appears to, on the effectiveness of apnea treatment. I wake several times during the night with lips flapping! This did not happen before the extraction. Because there are still some lower teeth, I am unable to close my mouth tightly ...more »

Submitted by (@lesliesmyth)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

If this question has an answer, it would help an unknown number of persons by once again providing effective treatment for sleep apnea. I find fatigue is building again, as it did before I was diagnosed and treated.

 

It may be simply a matter of a different style of mask, but it appears ideas on what kind are a bit sparse on the ground.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

One would need a sampling of persons with lower teeth (some, or all) who also have sleep apnea. One would have to determine whether indeed, there is a deterioration in quality of treatment, and if the number of lower teeth are a factor. Does the form of apnea make a difference? Does age or body weight play a part?

 

This is not exactly couched in academic, medical terms, but it is still a valid question. Its solution, or if a solution already exists, it's distribution among sleep physicians, would help those who experience this combination of circumstances.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Leslie H. Smyth

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-42 net votes
5 up votes
47 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Phenotypically accurate models of human heart, lung, blood, and sleep systems

There is a need to develop phenotypically accurate models of human heart, lung, blood, and sleep systems.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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28 net votes
42 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Iron Loss after Blood Donation and Its Effect on Donors’ Health

What is the effect of donation-induced iron deficiency on blood donor health?

Submitted by (@anne.eder)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Blood donation removes iron, and frequent blood donors commonly have low or absent iron stores. Donation frequency remains the strongest predictor of iron depletion among all donors, after controlling for body mass, race/ethnicity, and polymorphisms affecting iron metabolism. Less well documented is the effect of iron depletion on blood donor health and well-being. Iron deficiency may have a broad spectrum of physical and neurologic consequences, including impaired work capacity, altered cognitive function, pica and restless legs syndrome. The prevalence, duration, and severity of these conditions in blood donor populations are poorly elucidated. In contrast, modest iron deficits may be protective against cancer and cardiovascular disease. Some investigators have demonstrated the feasibility to connect donor information with clinical databases to study whether donation behavior and iron status have long-term consequences for donor health.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Studying the short-term clinical impact of donation-induced iron deficiency presents logistical and methodological challenges. Many outcomes of interest are not observable by blood center staff under routine procedures; further, such studies are subject to selection bias due to donor failure to return to donate following low hemoglobin deferral or adverse outcomes they associate with donation. However, given the size and demographic diversity of donor populations, even uncommon outcomes can be successfully studied under a multi-center approach. A prospective approach that doesn’t condition enrollment or completion of the study on return to donate, may avoid the methodological pitfalls. A wide array of clinical or neurological outcomes can feasibly be studied with sufficient blood centers and/or donor follow-up.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Dana Devine PhD and Anne Eder MD PhD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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3 net votes
19 up votes
16 down votes
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