Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What are the biological consequences of sleep loss or disruption and how can they best be avoided?

Arousals in obstructive sleep apena (OSA) are life saving, but the associated disruption of sleep is now thought to cause cognitive impairment, increased risk of high blood pressure and atherosclerosis, as well as glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome. The mechanisms for these downstream effects, however, are not well understood. Can these specific pathophysiological mechanisms be identified, and can ways for mitigating ...more »

Submitted by (@csaper)

Voting

96 net votes
125 up votes
29 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Understanding Cardiothoracic Surgery in Elderly Populations

There is a vital need for evidence-based clinical evaluation tools to assess operative risk and post-operative recovery in the elderly, including biomarkers of physiologic age and a simple/reliable clinical evaluation scheme to determine frailty as a risk factor for poor surgical outcomes.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Voting

39 net votes
56 up votes
17 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the Role of Macrophages in Pathogenesis of HHT

Alk 1 or Endoglin deficient endothelial cells promote recruitment of monocytes/macrophages and differentiation of them can play a critical role in development of arteriovenous malformations. Will targeting macrophage recruitment or activation instead of angiogenesis result in greater understanding leading to new therapeutic targets to control disease?

Submitted by (@mariannes.clancy)

Voting

1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Bringing Personalized Biochemistry and Biophysics to Bear on Problems of Personalized Heart, Lung and Blood Medicine

Precision medicine will provide unprecedented opportunities to tailor health care based on knowledge of personal patterns of genetic variations. These variations usually impact protein or RNA sequences, resulting in altered properties. These alterations can result in increased susceptibility to a particular disease or intolerance to common therapeutics. To take full advantage of knowing a patient’s set of gene variations, ...more »

Submitted by (@chuck.sanders)

Voting

-2 net votes
9 up votes
11 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Characterizing tissue response to injury

Can we characterize in detail the nature of tissue response to injury, resulting in either aberrant repair or regeneration, to generate predictive algorithms and targetable nodes where manipulation can alter the outcome?

 

Can we characterize tissue remodeling, repair and injury? What processes are involved that lead to outcome X and dependent on various perturbegens, genetics? How do you translate that?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Voting

13 net votes
22 up votes
9 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Balancing Risks and Benefits: How Do Clinical Guidelines in Cardiovascular Medicine Promote the Health of an Individual?

Much of the hopes for precision medicine (as outlined Dr. Dr. Collins) are based on deriving large amounts of genomic, proteomic, epigenomic and metabolomic data on large cohorts of patients. It will take decades to build these cohorts and even more time to analyze them and derive specific conclusions on how these will help individualize treatments. However, there is a pressing need for how to individualize contemporary ...more »

Submitted by (@jalees)

Voting

1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Cardiac Sarcoidosis

There is a fundamental gap in our knowledge about many aspects of cardiac sarcoidosis. Isolated cardiac involvement poses a particular challenge for diagnosis. Delay in establishing the correct diagnosis can be long and impacts in outcome since delay in therapy adversely impacts on outcome in these patients. There should be an increased effort to increase our knowledge about cardiac sarcoidosis; it's natural history, ...more »

Submitted by (@fbogun)

Voting

-1 net votes
1 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improving Representation of the Elderly in Clinical Research

There is a need to optimize long-term cognitive and functional outcomes in the aging population during and after cardiothorasic surgery, including the development of simple, objective tools to enable risk stratification for vulnerability to neurocognitive deficit. First, cardiothoracic surgical trials and clinical studies should be more "age-representative" and reflect the increasing proportion of the aging population. ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Voting

24 net votes
37 up votes
13 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

A Chidren's Oncology Group (COG) for sickle cell disease (SCD)?

We have all witnessed the success of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) funded Children's Oncology Group - an organization that has made tremendous advancements in the care of children with cancer, very rare compared to sickle cell disease. COG has been able to not only create a database of the numerous studies, but has the unique ability to make "smaller" institutions feel important as is evident by patient enrollment. ...more »

Submitted by (@smajumdar)

Voting

23 net votes
28 up votes
5 down votes
Active