Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Vascular biology and the pathophysiology of sepsis

Unravel the cellular & molecular mechanisms related to the vascular biology of sepsis and related cardiovascular collapse. The goal is to develop a new scientific framework for the prevention of sepsis related morbidity and mortality by applying novel approaches to discover new targets for biomarkers and therapy by promoting multidisciplinary research required for scientific cross-talk between complementary research disciplines ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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4 net votes
8 up votes
4 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Stem Cell Biology

There is a need to develop an artificial and functional hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche that allows for the expansion of repopulating HSCs.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Methods to expand hematopoietic stem cells have continued to be examined extensively because stem cell numbers in the graft are important for clinical outcomes following transplantation. These numbers are particularly relevant in umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation, where low numbers of stem cells are directly related to delayed hematopoietic and immune reconstitution. Improved HSC expansion strategies may significantly impact transplantation outcome, enabling broader applications beyond UCB transplantation. Furthermore, these strategies are also needed to realize the full therapeutic potential of genome editing technologies to correct hematopoietic stem cells derived from patients with hematologic disorders. Since efforts to expand HSCs in cytokine-supported liquid cultures have been largely unsuccessful, efficient expansion will require an appropriate context that is provided by the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Future studies must also evaluate how niche signals regulate stem cell function to optimize cell expansion, and proper humanized mouse models must be developed to help predict stem cell function and regulation by the niche.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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28 net votes
46 up votes
18 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the role of diet and nutrition in treatment, management and prevention of Heart Failure?

Heart Failure (HF) remains a major public health burden. A working group was convened by NHLBI and ODS in June, 2013 to address the role of diet and nutrition in management of HF. A review of existing evidence produced no clear rationale for appropriate dietary interventions. On the contrary, the group developed recommendations for conducting additional research specifically on the role of sodium, fluid, nutrients, and ...more »

Submitted by (@lvanhorn)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

As summarized following the Working Group meeting,compared with the situation for cardiovascular risk factor management, there is little well-founded evidence regarding the efficacy, safety, and clinical impact of dietary modifications for patients with various HF phenotypes. The importance of diet and nutrition to promote health and prevent or control disease is well established. Research on obesity, hypertension and cardiovascular disease have contributed to the development of nutritional guidelines to prevent these disease in the general population but efforts to determine nutritional needs for the patient with HF lack high caliber evidence regarding safety, efficacy, and clinical impact of dietary modifications. The stronger evidence and focus on disease prevention and health promotion with diet modifications like DASH cannot be easily applied or extrapolated for disease management, especially HF, because of critical knowledge gaps and potential harm. Research on HF has more recently identified and differentiated medical treatment and interventions appropriate for HF with or without preserved ejection fractions. This only adds to the questions surrounding diet and nutritional approaches to help reduce and prevent HF readmissions.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Chronic HF often presents as a multisystem disease with important co-morbidities such as anemia, insulin resistance or diabetes, autonomic dysregulation, and impaired renal function. Intestinal dysfunction with impaired motility and circulation and disturbed intestinal barrier and flora may lead to a chronic inflammatory state and nutrient malabsorption. In advanced cases, catabolic/anabolic imbalance is associated with cardiac cachexia, a difficult to treat condition which itself carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, psychosocial symptoms associated with HF, including depression and impaired cognition, can contribute to poor self-care and lack of adherence to recommended dietary, physical activity, and medication regimens. Nutritional status concerns for patients with HF increase with disease severity. Salt restriction is now controversial and clinicians give little attention to diet as a potential intervention to improve outcomes. Proposed recommendations:

1.Determine the correct sodium threshold; ranges of sodium and fluid intake, and the safety for sub-groups including HFPEF, HFREF, and cardiorenal syndrome. 2.Generate new knowledge which identifies therapeutic targets and understand the role of the gut microbiome on gastrointestinal malabsorption, inflammation, and protein balance in HF.

3.Apply innovative study designs to reduce evidence gaps 4.Develop technologies to facilitate nutrition research and address weight and multiple risk factors should be addressed.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Linda Van Horn, PhD, RD

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2 net votes
3 up votes
1 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Clinical Trials in Pediatric Sleep Disorders

Effect of anti-inflammatory medications (including nasal steroids and leukotriene antagonists) in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, stratified for severity of OSAS as well as presence of atopy.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Small studies suggest a therapeutic effect of anti-inflammatory medication in childhood OSAS. This may be especially useful in children with residual OSAS following adenotonsillectomy (as CPAP adherence tends to be low) or children who are poor candidates for surgery. Current studies have been limited to children with extremely mild OSAS, have not determined whether atopy plays a role in the response to therapy, and have been limited to very short-term trials.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Redefining asthma: origins of obstructive airways disease

Can detailed longitudinal study of lung disease in infancy/early childhood improve our understanding of the origins of obstructive airways disease, and the variation seen in asthma phenotypes and severity?

Submitted by (@pittmanj)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Asthma is, to some extent, an umbrella term that encompasses a broadly heterogenous (in severity, symptoms, and pathophysiology) group of obstructive lung diseases. This is even more true if we examine the "wheezy infant," a population defined almost exclusively by the presence of wheeze, cough, or noisy breathing with very little understanding of disease mechanism or pathophysiology, and few evidence-based treatment options. Improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of wheeze and recurrent cough in early childhood, and how these evolve into various phenotypes of "asthma," through comprehensive longitudinal study of infants and young children may lead to better endotyping of disease and improved therapeutic options, as well as the possibility of disease prevention.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

We lack adequate biomarkers (of inflammation, structural and functional lung disease, microbiome, nutrition, etc) to investigate lung disease in infancy and early childhood. Identifying biomarkers with adequate sensitivity, and with a safety profile that allows for repeated measures in large groups of children, will be key to identifying the early childhood origins of all lung diseases.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Jessica Pittman

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-7 net votes
7 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Development of right ventricular-targeted therapies in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. A great increase in the treatment armamentarium has been noted for this rare disease in the past 20 years, with 12 new PAH-targeted therapies. Though these therapies do improve cardiac performance, this is most likely due to their primary ...more »

Submitted by (@katherinek)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Since 2006, 12 medical therapies for PAH have been approved by the FDA, which have increased survival of this rare disease from around 2.8 years to approximately 9 years; these therapies primarily act by dilating the pulmonary arteries in order to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance to blood flow. However, patients continue to die from right ventricular failure, highlighting the important relationship of the pulmonary arterial system and right ventricle (RV). Despite patients ultimately dying from RV failure, little is known about the effect of the currently available PAH-targeted therapies on RV functional support. Prostacyclins, PDE5i, and sGC agonists are thought to enhance RV contractility—though the long-term effects remain unknown—while ERAs are thought to reduce it. The direct RV effect of some potential therapies targeting the pseudo-malignancy theory of PAH is a concern, as these therapies seek to reduce the hypertrophy and angiogenesis that may actually be supporting the adapting RV. Further, therapies targeting the ventricle directly have historically been centered on the LV—for example β-adrenergic receptor blockers and RAS inhibition—and either remain controversial or without data in the RV. There remains no identified RV-specific therapy to either provide support through increase contractility or molecularly prevent the progression from RV hypertrophy to ultimate failure.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The primary challenge of addressing this CC on the lack of RV-targeted therapies for the treatment of PAH is the comprehensive analysis and support that will need to be provided, spanning from basic to clinical science. To begin, strong support of biologic characterization of the right ventricle needs to be provided. The RV is distinctly different from the more comprehensively studied left ventricle, and subsequently responds differently to autocrine, paracrine, neuroendocrine, pressure, and pharmaceutical changes to name only a few. However, when identified, these RV biologic distinctions can be translated and tested clinically to more comprehensively and appropriately treat the RV-arterial uncoupling ultimately leading to right heart failure: through both reduction in afterload and an increase in contractility.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Katherine Kroner, Michael Patrick Gray, PHA

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66 net votes
75 up votes
9 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Treatment Options for Diabetics and Impact on Cardiovascular Health

As a clinician, over the years I have noted major differences in adverse cardiovascular outcomes in diabetics who are treated with insulin +/- oral agents compared to those only treated with oral agents. Cardiovascular events occur much less often and at a much later timeframe in diabetics ("Type 2/adult onset") treated with insulin as the primary method. Even with newer agents, there may be slight improvement, but ...more »

Submitted by (@patty.gladowski)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Delaying the onset of injury to vasculature in Type 2 diabetics would have a major impact on quality of life for the diabetic and costs to the healthcare system. Dialysis and related costs are around $200,000/yr and interfere with life and ability to work, leg ulcers are often chronic and in many cases result in amputation.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This study could be performed in the clinical setting or could be completed with chart review to determine diabetics on insulin on insulin and review outcomes. If access to charts for patients continuously treated for five years or longer were available, this study could be done in a shorter timeframe and at less cost. A long term and costly alternative would be to begin a clinical trial. Medical claims data may be an alternative, but it would be important to identify onset of diabetes and treatment for a minimum of five years.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Patricia Gladowski

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3 net votes
7 up votes
4 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Understanding the Genetic & Epigenetic Basis of Congenital Heart Disease?

Over the last thirty years, our fundamental understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of congenital heart disease has lagged the tremendous advances in the surgical and clinical care of infants with this group of disorders. We need to close this gap with investigation into the genetic basis of congenital heart malformations to develop new models of disease. The goall is translate an improved molecular genetic and ...more »

Submitted by (@jamesr.priestmd)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital malformation and the most common cause of mortality during the first year of life. Approximately 70% of cases occur sporadically without a strong family history or identifiable genetic syndrome, and the primary heritable basis of most non-syndromic CHD has yet to be identified. Studies of affected kindreds, syndromic disease, and more recently genome wide association studies (GWAS) have shed light on a handful of causal loci, while exome sequencing and studies of structural variation uncovering rare de novo variants in trios have yielded only an 8-10% rate of diagnosis in cohorts with CHD. Despite the application of contemporary techniques and study design to genetic discovery in CHD, the majority of the genetic risk for human cardiac malformations remains unexplained.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

One key challenge is that many of the stakeholders including those affected with congenital heart disease (children), along with the physicians make a diagnosis and referral (obstetricians, neonatologists, general pediatricians), are generally funded by other agencies (NICHD). Trans-agency collaboration and cooperation is necessary to improve the translational research structures necessary to improve disease.

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22 net votes
37 up votes
15 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Effect of early mobilization

Does early mobilization, i.e. as soon as mechanical ventilation begins, improve long term outcomes in ALI survivors??

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

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2 net votes
2 up votes
0 down votes
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