Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Paralysis must be better known to doctors, therapists, and the public

Sleep Paralysis (SP) is a very common (up to 40% of all people), yet little-known condition that is terrifying, and potentially traumatizing, especially to people who are unaware of this condition. It is critical that SP is better known by all doctors, therapists, and the public. Too many people are mistreated and misdiagnosed as psychotic or even demon possessed when they do not understand SP, or they hide the experience ...more »

Submitted by (@kendraz)

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10 net votes
15 up votes
5 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Inflammation: what is the role of the blood microbiome?

Blood is not continuously sterile. Data from dental studies, blood donors, and random blood cultures document that "normal" human blood often harbors microbes. Sepsis only occurs when immunological regulatory systems fail. Growing evidence link subclinical, potentially transient bacteremia to cardiovascular and other diseases. Could many of the diseases associated with inflammatory markers represent either continuous ...more »

Submitted by (@kevinfiscella)

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15 net votes
25 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Optimal hemoglobin threshold for transfusion in children with ARDS?

Do different hemoglobin transfusion thresholds alter outcomes in children with ARDS? What is the optimal *minimum* transfusion threshold for children with ARDS? What patient-centered outcomes can be affected by transfusion strategies: ventilator free days, time to organ function recovery, duration of intensive care stay, survival?

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

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8 net votes
9 up votes
1 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Clinical Trials and Rare Diseases

Strategies and infrastructure to support clinical trials in rare diseases must go further in the development of critical partnerships with advocacy organizations. These partnerships must be formalized and based on models that help to accelerate the research.

Submitted by (@dappell)

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11 net votes
13 up votes
2 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Strategic effort against obesity

The major challenge we face is that of the epidemic of obesity. It affects more than half the population, particularly Hispanics, blacks and those in the lower income bracket.

It is responsible for premature death, coronary disease, acute myocardial infarction. Atrial fibrillation and cancer.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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3 net votes
5 up votes
2 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Exercise effects on cellular level

What cellular and/or intracellular signaling events are activated in response to acute or chronic physical activity that lead to or explain improvements in health outcomes, prevention, or treatment of lung diseases?

Which metabolic signatures induced by exercise/physical activity would be predictive/ associated with poor lung disease prognosis?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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18 net votes
32 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What are the molecular mechanisms of lung injury, and how do they differ in children?

Both adults and children have significant morbidity and mortality due to lung injury, but have different etiologies and outcomes. It is possible that the underlying pathobiology in the two groups is different. There are no targeted therapies for lung injury, indicating that the cause is still not understood.

Submitted by (@rft2106)

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4 net votes
4 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Redox regulation of cardiovascular and lung disease through thiols

Redox imbalance as represented by alterations in oxidative versus reductive stresses are well appreciated to occur during nearly all forms of cardiovascular and lung diseases. However, specific molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes remain largely unknown and poorly organized. Study of redox biology principals has revealed that protein cysteine thiols are a unique target for redox posttranslational modifications ...more »

Submitted by (@ckevil)

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5 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improving understanding of heart attack mechanisms in women and targeting of treatment

There remain many differences between women and men in the risk of myocardial infarction (MI or “heart attack”), manifestations of MI and outcomes after MI. The time in which the facts about differences between the sexes were unknown or ignored has passed. However, there are many basic answers women and their physicians need, such as: a) Why are younger women with MI at such high risk of death as compared to their male ...more »

Submitted by (@harmony.reynolds)

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22 net votes
29 up votes
7 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Clinical trial of AAT augmentation therapy in PI MZ subjects

Although severely alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (PI ZZ) individuals are rare, PI MZ subjects comprise approximately 3% of the US population. Mounting evidence suggests that PI MZ is a significant risk factor for COPD. A clinical trial of COPD exacerbation frequency using AAT augmentation therapy in PI MZ subjects with moderate-to-severe COPD could provide a rationale for AAT augmentation therapy (or small molecule neutrophil ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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