Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.
(@ckevil)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Gasotransmitter regulation of cardiovascular and lung health and disease

Gasotransmitters, such as nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen, have emerged as potent mediators of cardiovascular and lung cellular and molecular pathophysiology. While the physiological importance of these agents is becoming clearer, studies of gasotransmitters continue to suffer from several limitations such as formation, detection, metabolism, and molecular and cellular mechanistic insights. ...more »

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-5 net votes
6 up votes
11 down votes
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(@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Outcomes of heterogeneous responses to tiotropium

Tiotropium is widely used for COPD, but patients report highly variable responses to this medication. A clinical trial of severe COPD subjects could address both short-term (bronchodilator effect) and intermediate-term (COPD exacerbations) outcomes of this heterogeneous response by examining radiologic (chest CT), clinical (Six Minute Walk, Spirometry), and pharmacogenetic (GWAS) influences on this heterogeneous response. ...more »

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2 net votes
2 up votes
0 down votes
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(@dtriulzi)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Development of Optimally Hemostatic, Systemically Safe, Platelet Mimetics or Substitutes

What are the knowledge and technological gaps in production, evaluation and clinical translation of donor-independent platelets for transfusions? Specific questions include: a) How can stem or progenitor cells be expanded to maximize platelet production?; b) What are the hemostatically relevant design and function requirements and evaluation metrics for ideal/optimal “biologic” and “synthetic” platelets? c) What preclinical ...more »

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20 net votes
38 up votes
18 down votes
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(@jiang001)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What about the impact of regulation of genes in response to external stimulation on human health

We are focusing a lot on the genes that may be protective or harmful to our lives. But what about the regulation of genes in response to external stimulations, such as psychosocial and/or environmental, that are probably more accountable for whether we live healthier or not.

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-4 net votes
5 up votes
9 down votes
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(@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Heart transplant surveillance

It is essential to develop clinically viable, non-invasive, less expensive technologies for the surveillance of allograft rejection in heart transplant patients. Critical challenges that exist in the near term or long term surveillance after transplant is the unavailability of molecular and cellular level markers that can be non-invasively imaged and quantified detect rejection and thus improve patient survival. Development ...more »

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1 net vote
14 up votes
13 down votes
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(@golan0)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Reducing Disparities

Given the dearth of information on cardiovascular, lung, and hematologic outcomes in minorities, NHLBI should develop strategic aims that promote evaluation of these outcomes and potential interactions with kidney disease that disproportionately affect minorities.

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0 net votes
1 up votes
1 down votes
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(@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Reducing Atrial Fibrillation by treating modifiable risk factors

Would better management of modifiable risk factors, including obesity, sleep apnea, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and metabolic syndrome, reduce atrial fibrillation recurrence? Furthermore, what are the best methods to reduce the onset, hospitalization, and death due to atrial fibrillation, especially that associated with aging

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3 net votes
18 up votes
15 down votes
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