Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Vasopressin layered on to norepinephrine treatment for septic shock

We know that vasopressin layered on to norepinephrine treatment for septic shock tends to produce better outcomes (VASST trial, Russell et al) than norepinephrine alone. We still need to know if norepinephrine should be first line or if vasopressin should be first line (and perhaps monotherapy) for septic shock.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Voting

1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Diaphragmatic dysfunction in critical illness

Diaphragmatic dysfunction occurs more frequently than clinically recognized in the setting of acute critical illness or injury. This contributes to both incipient and prolonged respiratory failure, as well as the growth of long-term acute care/rehab hospitalizations. We need a better understanding of the mechanisms of dysfunction as well as strategies to mitigate loss of diaphragmatic muscle mass, ultimately leading ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Voting

-1 net votes
1 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulseless Electrical Activity (PEA) - replacing VF/VT

As VF/VT rates continue to decrease in cardiac arrest to levels below 25%, the importance of understanding the pathways and epidemiology of PEA gains public health importance. Additionally, there is a need to determine the co-morbidities and/or pharmacologic agents that contribute to the causation of this rhythm.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Voting

-9 net votes
7 up votes
16 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Environmental induction of congenital heart defects and finding means of prevention

Congenital heart defects (CHDs) continue to be the leading cause of death among all infants with birth defects. It is reported that approximately 10% of cardiac congenital anomalies have a genetic basis. An equal percentage, or ~10%, is due to environmental factors. For ~60% the etiology is unknown and considered to have a multifactorial basis, eg, environmental agents having a role against a specific genetic background, ...more »

Submitted by (@kerstilinask)

Voting

-7 net votes
16 up votes
23 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Effect of obesity on recovery of lung function in pediatric survivors of critical illness

What are the determinants of persistent respiratory failure in children? Are obese children at greater risk for prolonged mechanical ventilation than non-obese children? Does BMI affect the time to recovery of lung function in obese children with ARDS? What is the pathogenesis and molecular contributors of obesity on respiratory failure in critical illness?

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Voting

1 net vote
3 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Shift from NHLBI guided research to individual investigator initiative

NHLBI directed research should be abandoned and switched to investigator initiated research. I respectfully suggest read the following assay by Brown and Goldstein, Science 2012; 338: 1033-1034 The best way to run the science sponsored by the NIH (or NHLBI) is not to guide it (analogy to running science from ivory tower) but let the investigators decide what is worth pursuing. Get rid of NHLBI-directed research initiative ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Voting

47 net votes
63 up votes
16 down votes
Active