Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

To facilitate innovation and accelerate research translation, knowledge dissemination, and implementation science that enhances public health.

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

The need for funding priorities and emphasis on valve disease and large-animal preclinical studies

Investigators need NHLBI support for programs that transform our approach to heart valve disease to mechanism-based prevention with large-animal preclinical studies through: an NHLBI-sponsored sponsored Heart Valve Network; development of models of genetic and acquired valve disease; a study section devoted to valve disease; and RFAs and RFPs based on Task Force priorities in mitral valve disease.

Submitted by (@rlevine)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Substituting scientific-medical insight before profit in drug development

Since the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 and the rise of the FDA, the US federal government has directly inserted itself into medical research, primarily from a business perspective. The Orphan Drug Act of 1983 monetarily incentivized the process for rare diseases, but for ultra-rare diseases of < 1,000 patients, it does not work. Successful drugs for rare diseases have enormous price tags to compensate their development ...more »

Submitted by (@mtothbsf)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

High cost, high risk and unclear benefits of current COPD care

Challenge the unspoken of high cost, high risk and unclear benefits of current COPD care a. PRCT of lung transplantation vs. optimized medical care b. Noninvasive ventilation for treatment of chronic severe respiratory failure c. Chronic combined vs. de-escalation of chronic bronchodilator therapy to as needed for GOLD stages III-IV d. Self management programs in COPD e. Telemedicine in outpatient management of severe ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

New treatment for HIV and HIV-related lymphoma

Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), while clearly invaluable, does not halt growth or proliferation of HL, in fact, while AIDS-defining malignancies like Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) have declined thanks to HAART, the incidence of HL in HIV patients has actually increased, from 14 times higher than that of non-HIV patients in the pre-HAART era to 32 times higher in the HAART era. Typical ...more »

Submitted by (@dongfang.liu)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Translational research need not be mechanistic

Translation means laying the groundwork to advance an idea into the clinic. Late-stage translation means doing what FDA and IRBs require to obtain approval for an IND or an IDE and the associated protocol to test a new idea in humans. Mechanism is the mantra for investigator-initiated research in NIH study sections, but translation is often painstaking detailed work that follows mechanistic investigations, which typically ...more »

Submitted by (@marban)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Brief vs. teach-to-goal interventions in teaching patients with COPD to use inhalers

What is the comparative effectiveness of brief interventions to teach patients respiratory inhaler use (e.g., verbal and written instructions) vs. teach-to-goal interventions (brief interventions plus demonstration of correct technique, patient teach-back, feedback, and repeat instruction if needed) on respiratory inhaler technique and patient-reported outcomes (symptom frequency, activities of daily living, quality of ...more »

Submitted by (@jimandmarynelson)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Using "omics" technologies to define responders to drug therapies

Metabolomic and proteomic technologies open tremendous avenues to define at the systemic level and, in the case of the lung, the organ level response to drug and non-drug interventions. The concept of responders and non-responders to therapies is poorly defined and hampers development of biomarkers and appropriate animal models. Omics technologies can bridge these important areas. In lung disease, breath analysis could ...more »

Submitted by (@njkenyon)

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