Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

To support the future of investigator-initiated research by sustaining and developing a diverse biomedical workforce with the skills and research resources to pursue emerging opportunities in science.

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Expanding the Pool of NHLBI Applicants

NHLBI should consider creating specific programs that encourage the participation of investigators that often do not apply to NHLBI such as kidney researchers.

Submitted by (@golan0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Need to train and nurture more "translators"!

One of the major challenges in translating from bench-to-bedside and back is communication: the ability of basic and clinical scientists to understand each other's scientific language to be able to appreciate the importance of the other’s research questions and findings.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Having an increased number of researchers able to connect dots across the continuum of translational research should increase overall success of translation of ideas into health.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This requires "rearranging" of already existing elements. Within 5-10 years of running specifically designed re/cross -training programs, the effects might be widely visible.

Basic scientists usually do not keep up with the latest outcomes of important clinical studies, and thus might miss important starting points for new basic research (e.g., negative trials that suggest the need for new hypotheses). The great majority of clinical scientists do not attend basic scientific sessions because are turned off by the specialized (dense/obscure) scientific terms used. Those who are interested in being translators have a hard time integrating and surviving in the "opposite camp" (i.e., at many medical schools, basic scientists are expected to bring in all their salary in a clinical department, and clinicians get little protected time for basic research)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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39 up votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Research training to support population-focused obesity research in ethnic minority populations

NIH is already facing a challenge in increasing the number and viability of researchers of color. Obesity research in black (or other high risk minority) populations can be used to explore how research training programs that focus on specific issues of importance to populations of color might contribute to the recruitment and success of ethnic minority researchers in the NIH system.

Submitted by (@skumanyi)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

To say the least, not all researchers of color study disparities related issues and not all disparities research is done by researchers of color. That is the way it should be. However, I suspect that research focusing on populations of color would attract a greater than average proportion of researchers of color (NIMHD might have data on this but NIMHD funding alone would be grossly insufficient as the only relevant funding stream. It would also be inappropriate and ineffective to silo the entire burden as an NIMHD responsibility).

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The infrastructure for such training might not exist. Isolated minority researchers attached to various centers and programs would not necessarily work; some sort of networking would have to be done based on an infrastructure devoted to population-oriented obesity research and with a critical mass of obesity researchers focusing on the black (or other) population..

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Shiriki Kumanyika, Melicia Whitt-Glover, Debra Haire-Joshu

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6 net votes
6 up votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Early Career Physician Scientists are heading toward extinction

As seen by ~ 40% steady decline in number of K-08 grant applicants over 2005-2014 period, early career physician scientists who can do both basic-translation research and take care of patients are dwindling. Lack of institutional support, lack of ACGME support, increasing demands of clinical training, increasing compliance requirement, and disadvantaged position (i.e., significantly less preparation time and continued ...more »

Submitted by (@ctong0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Physician scientists are needed to provide the bridge between clinical needs and scientific endeavors. Physician scientists can take the needs to scientific community for research and bring new discoveries toward known diseases. Without this bridge, mismatch between clinical need and research will grow.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

NHLBI has reported only about 50% of K-08 awardee apply for R01 in a different critical challenge note. Thus, combination of decreasing number of K-08 applicants and then less than half of the awardees are applying for R01 show that the next generation of physician scientists is now threatened.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Carl Tong

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26 up votes
13 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Institutional Support for K applicants as they transition to independence

What can research institutions do to entice and support potential and actual K award applicants to become independent scientists?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The period between the end of the K award and the first R01 is a critical one wherein many trainees, with no financial support from their institutions, opt out of a science career and pursue other viable sources of income, such as in the clinics, in teaching, or in the private sector. An investment from their institution, either by way of bridge awards, protected time, or salary commitment will enable retention of these highly- trained individuals and ensure a vibrant research workforce in the years to come.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This type of activity can be initiated immediately by the private institutions as a way of motivating physician- scientists and other scientists to remain in the academe, and eventually reap the rewards by way of research awards that bring prestige and indirect costs back to the institution.

In an analysis of 132 NHLBI Division of Lung Diseases K08 grantees between FY2005-2011, only 52% applied for subsequent NIH grants, whereas 48% did not even try, suggesting more incentives should be given for them to stay within the biomedical research workforce. However, among the Early Stage Investigators (ESIs) funded in 2013, 58% had previous training grants, suggesting training grants give Research Project Grant (RPG) applicants a definite edge.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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74 net votes
102 up votes
28 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Preserving and promoting expertise in integrative physiology

From my perspective, one of the key “critical challenges” facing the NHLBI in particular, and medical science in general, is to avoid being blinded by the promises of the reductionists in the “personalized, precision medicine” of the future. In order to understand the advances being made at the molecular level, we need to preserve and promote expertise in truly integrative physiology, what I like to call “PHYSIOMICS”. ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Unfortunately, human physiologists are being squeezed out of the medical industrial complex by the basic scientists on one end, and the epidemiologists on the other. Most departments of medicine now require on 80/20 commitment to have a significant research component of an academic career, and it is becoming increasingly difficult for those few of us physiologists remaining to compete with the pressures of both research funding and clinical mandates. I urge the leadership at NHLBI to preserve a strong focus on human physiology, and continue to support the small, but high resolution studies that are required to answer key research questions. I would submit that studying an individual patient’s unique physiology is as much “personalized” or “precision” medicine as it is to read their genome. Remember, despite billions of dollars of research support, there remains nothing better to predict the risk of diabetes, than a simple measure of waist size!

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Benjamin Levine

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6 net votes
16 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Increasing the pool of senior mentors

What is the best way for the mentoring effort of senior investigators to be encouraged, enhanced, and supported to develop early career investigators?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Increasing the pool of and enhancing the skills of diverse senior mentors is critical to the development of young investigators in appropriate scientific disciplines. This would promote the development of strategies to improve the quality and number of available mentors and promote an approach to mentoring that includes science, career development and research management.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The development of the next generation of talented new investigators who are committed to conducting research related to the mission of NHLBI can be accomplished through mechanisms that provide protected time and resources to senior investigators.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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8 net votes
27 up votes
19 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Integrated Research Training

There is a need to encourage the development and growth of integrated and multi-disciplinary biomedical research skills needed to utilize emerging technology, infrastructure, and paradigms, including the development of competitive research training strategies that embrace the role of multi-institutional and professional scientific organization research collaboration.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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8 net votes
16 up votes
8 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Quantitative training in the era of big data

Should training in biostatistics, computer science, bioinformatics become broader for the entire biomedical community in this era of very large data sets?

 

How can we grow the number of specialists in biostatistics (and these related fields) without causing an oversupply?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Broad impact over all of biomedical science.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Training could be enhanced within the NHLBI, or externally through increased funding for appropriate programs in quantitative methods for biomedical scientists and increased funding for graduate training in biostatistics (and related quantitative areas).

 

Challenges: Poor training and disinterest in the mathematical sciences among many medical scientists. Fewer biostatisticians (etc.) than needed to fill current positions.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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40 net votes
55 up votes
15 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

What should mentors report?

There is a need to establish markers that are predictive of future trainee success.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Instructions to Mentors for K Awards and Sponsors for F awards for reporting on the progress of their trainees in RPPR non-competitive renewal applications are very general. Developing more specific criteria and rankings should better predict future stars. Having more explicit training criteria throughout the life of a program could improve the overall quality of the mentoring and the training within the program.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Five to ten years is sufficient time to track a representative sample of programs to develop criteria to be tested.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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6 up votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Pipeline of clinician scientists

Maintaining the pipeline of clinician scientists via early and mid-career awards. Promote the development of collaborative teams.

Submitted by (@societyforvascularsurgery)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society for Vascular Surgery

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5 net votes
6 up votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Similar changes to those in modern manufacdturing are required through our new technical society inlcuding medicine.

Attitudes to Mistakes. Changing prescription and protocol philosophy. As an older patient, I am 89, I have one thing many others do not have, experience. As an engineer with much experience in manufacturing industry I have seen great recent changes in manufacturing sociology. Now, even top management comes to listen to “the Gemba” (the shop floor) and what could be regarded as mistakes are seen as opportunities to improve ...more »

Submitted by (@khop00)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

As an engineer with considerable experience in manufacturing industry I have seen great changes in manufacturing sociology. We have come to listen to the Gemba (the shop floor) and inappropriate procedures are now regarded as opportunities to improve not something to be punished. Perhaps I can mention that my writing has been praised on this subject, for example for the book, "The Puritan Gift” by Kenneth and Will Hopper. “This is one of the best books I have ever read in my long life, and I don’t just mean books on business” Foreword: by Russ Ackoff, Wharton Business School. “late in their lives (the Hoppers) have given us an extraordinary gift” (translated from Chinese) Promise Hsu, Vista Magazine

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

I suggest as a subject for discussion, that a change to a more aggressive use of antibiotics could save antibiotics. There is an old saying that the best time to hit a man is when he is down. The same surely applies to harmful bacteria.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Kenneth Hopper

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