Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

DEVELOPMENT OF A PERSONALIZED APPROACH TO SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is developing evidence of major individual differences in pathways to different common sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. Moreover, there is evidence of different clinical presentations of disease and different outcomes. For example, some subjects with obstructive sleep apnea who get excessive sleepiness while others do not. The latter are still at risk for other consequences of the disorder such ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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There is a strong rationale for application of a personalized approach to sleep disorders. This requires approaching this question using multiple domains as in other areas of medicine—clinical features, physiological factors, application of the –omic approaches, genetics. The impact of this will be several:

 

a. A new way to classify sleep disorders.

b. Identification of subgroups of patients with apparently the same disorder who will have different outcomes of therapy.

c. Identification of subgroups of patients who will have different approaches to diagnosis.

d. Identification of subgroups of patients with apparently the same disorder who will have different therapeutic approaches.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

These sleep and circadian disorders are extremely common. There is a risk infrastructure for this type of research based on the large number of accredited sleep centers in the United States that could be used for subject recruitment and who can adopt similar techniques. There is also a rich set of data obtained from sleep studies that could be used to identify new patterns that reflect different subgroups of subjects. These studies need to be based on clinical populations of patients who present with the different disorders rather than on population-based cohorts.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Missing upper teeth & sleep apnea treatment: Problems?

I am a 73 year old female with Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis, Complex Sleep Neap, using oxygen @ 4-5 L/min 24/7 who just had my upper teeth extracted. I notice this has a negative effect, or appears to, on the effectiveness of apnea treatment. I wake several times during the night with lips flapping! This did not happen before the extraction. Because there are still some lower teeth, I am unable to close my mouth tightly ...more »

Submitted by (@lesliesmyth)

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If this question has an answer, it would help an unknown number of persons by once again providing effective treatment for sleep apnea. I find fatigue is building again, as it did before I was diagnosed and treated.

 

It may be simply a matter of a different style of mask, but it appears ideas on what kind are a bit sparse on the ground.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

One would need a sampling of persons with lower teeth (some, or all) who also have sleep apnea. One would have to determine whether indeed, there is a deterioration in quality of treatment, and if the number of lower teeth are a factor. Does the form of apnea make a difference? Does age or body weight play a part?

 

This is not exactly couched in academic, medical terms, but it is still a valid question. Its solution, or if a solution already exists, it's distribution among sleep physicians, would help those who experience this combination of circumstances.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Leslie H. Smyth

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Clinical Trials in Pediatric Sleep Disorders

Effectiveness of medications for cataplexy in children.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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Pediatric sleep experts agree that there appears to be a mini-epidemic of narcolepsy in children currently, characterized by acute onset of disease with severe symptoms and difficult to control cataplexy, in very young children. No drugs are approved for treatment of cataplexy in children, and drugs typically used in adults are not FDA-approved for use in children. A multicenter trial would be needed in order to accumulate sufficient cases for a randomized controlled trial.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Can Psychological Science Improve Weight Loss?

Will sensitivity to the psychological aspects of obesity, including lifestyle priorities and motivations, improve the efficacy of long-term effectiveness of weight loss and obesity prevention interventions?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

A primary focus on principles of psychology may result in significantly improved control of the obesity epidemic. Effective interventions could reduce the risk of diabetes, sleep apnea, and hypertension. This research could also affect clinical practice guidelines for weight loss and obesity treatment.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Psychological science has been successful in developing effective treatments for a number of conditions, including sleep disorders, depressive symptoms, anxiety and phobias. Many of the behavioral principles employed in such interventions (e.g., cognitive restructuring, motivational methods) could be translated for the prevention and treatment of obesity within a reasonable time frame. Additional attention should be directed to the needs of population subgroups in which obesity is most prevalent.

In their Viewpoint article on weight loss intervention research, Pagoto and Appelhans (JAMA, 2013, see attachment) question whether a continued focus on dietary factors in research on weight loss and obesity is warranted. Their commentary raises the importance of attention to the individual psychological characteristics that influence adherence to weight loss interventions rather than dietary composition.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What causes the structural abnormalities that cause sleep apnea, and how can they be prevented?

It is estimated that up to 28% of the population suffer from sleep apnea, which impairs functioning and reduces quality of life, while increasing risk of accidents and a variety of cardiovascular, metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases. A large portion of sleep apnea cases are caused by abnormal oro-nasal-maxillo-mandibular features that result in crowding of the upper airway, making it vulnerable to collapsing or ...more »

Submitted by (@bmdixon)

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Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition, which causes chronic fatigue and daytime sleepiness, as well as cognitive impairments affecting learning, concentration, and memory. Over the long term, it increases many health risks, including accidents, cardiovascular disease, and depression. OSA is characterized by partial, or complete, blockage of the airway during sleep, so that breathing repeatedly pauses or airflow is limited, causing repeated arousals from sleep. It is usually secondary to a narrow, or collapsible, airway due to either 1) obesity or overweight, or 2) abnormal morphology of the mandible or maxilla bones, which crowds facial structures, such as the tongue and nose, narrowing the pharynx. The causes of obesity are already being well studied, but there is relatively little research on the etiology of the structural abnormalities involved in OSA. Abnormalities of facial structure are widespread in the population causing, not only OSA, but also orthodontic problems that require many to get braces or have wisdom teeth extracted, and widespread temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems. However, multiple studies have documented that these abnormalities are almost completely absent from populations living a preindustrial, agrarian or forager, lifestyle, making them a “disease of civilization”. In particular, the abnormalities are associated with consumption of a modern diet of processed foods during prenatal, infant, and early childhood development.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Current evidence implicates three factors in the development of these structural abnormalities: prenatal maternal nutrition (especially vitamin K2 status), breastfeeding vs. bottle-feeding, and frequency of consumption of tough foods after weaning (which provides exercise to the jaw). We need to form a large cohort and study orthodontic development prospectively from fetal development through mid-childhood, with data on diet, feeding practices, and physiological measures of nutrient status. Measurement methods are available using existing technologies to collect the necessary data on each of these measures. Determining the causes responsible for these structural abnormalities will enable further research to demonstrate effective methods of preventing them. Given that many patients with OSA are rendered so miserable by it that they undergo maxillomandibular advancement surgery to correct it, an expensive procedure with a lengthy recovery period, prevention would be a far better solution. This research will move us a big step closer to a future without sleep apnea and its formidable collection of negative effects on health and functioning.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Bonnie Dixon

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Apnea

Does treating sleep apnea benefit patients with obstructive lung disease?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Apnea - Trial of Treatment vs No Treatment of Snoring

Randomized trial of the treatment of snoring vs. no treatment.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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Snoring is increasingly implicated as potential disruptor of carotid artery intima and function. Repetitive vibratory trauma has been hypothesized as cause of this. Intermediate markers of cardiovascular risk such as intimal thickening have been linked to snoring as independent from sleep apnea. This field is ready for a larger scale trial in which snoring is intervened upon and IMT is measured as one of several endpoints. Other endpoints could be QOL measures, sleepiness, etc. Another reason this field is ready to be addressed is we now have inexpensive nasal resistors, which treat snoring without the need for surgery, oral appliances, or CPAP. These would allow the sleep medicine field to do a trial of such therapy vs. a sham therapy.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Clinical Trials in Pediatric Sleep Disorders - Effect of adenotonsillectomy

Effect of adenotonsillectomy on behavioral and cardiovascular outcomes in children with primary snoring

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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The recent NHLBI Childhood Adenotonsillectomy (CHAT) study showed highly significant behavioral improvements in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome . This study included children with an apnea hypopnea index as low as 2/hr. Many small or suboptimally controlled studies suggest that even primary snoring can affect behavior. If large randomized controlled trials confirm this finding, it will radically affect the treatment of the estimated 10% of children who snore.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Apnea - Diagnostic Test

The notion that in order to be treated with CPAP for sleep apnea you first must have a diagnostic test, which involves either a sleep laboratory or a home study, needs to be examined.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

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This idea is far reaching and possibly ahead of the curve a bit but it represents a direction that the sleep apnea field eventually should explore. Consider developing a clinical diagnosis of sleep apnea based on clinical symptoms and exam findings and then randomized those patients meeting the definition to a trial of autocpap for 3 months or to a traditional evaluation (home diagnostic test then APAP) for 3 months. Close follow up is necessary but with wireless telephony now available for CPAP and estimates of AHI available through CPAP adherence downloads, this study is feasible. If such a case diagnosis of sleep apnea can be developed (and I believe it can), then many more patients may be able to be treated. This approach, if successful, would shake-up the field considerably and potentially opens up treatment to many more OSA sufferers.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

SLEEP DISORDERS AS A MODIFIABLE RISK FACTOR FOR CHRONIC DISEASE

There is developing evidence that sleep disorders, in particular obstructive sleep apnea and inadequate sleep, can influence the course of other chronic diseases. Observational studies show that CPAP treatment of patients with pre-diabetes who have OSA reduces the incidence of future diabetes. Moreover, animal and human data indicate that insufficient sleep and sleep apnea can affect the rate of progression of neurodegenerative ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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This question will have considerable impact. Sleep apnea is an independent risk factor for insulin resistance. Moreover, observational studies show that treatment of OSA reduces the rate of future diabetes compared to that which occurs in untreated OSA. Therefore, identifying OSA and treating this could have a profound impact on reducing the rate of diabetes, i.e., a preventative strategy.

 

Both sleep loss and obstructive sleep apnea have also been shown to be risk factors for subsequent development of Alzheimer’s disease. This has been shown in mouse models and in epidemiological studies to address whether insufficient sleep and sleep apnea are independent risk factors for development of Alzheimer’s disease, in particular accelerating their onset. Determining whether this is so and whether interventions to treat these sleep disorders delay onset of diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease would have profound public health significance.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

These disorders are extremely common so that recruitment of subjects is not challenging. Moreover, new technology reduces protocol burden to assess individuals. All studies can be done in the patients’ home. There are existing cohort studies focused on diabetes and the Alzheimer’s Center program that could be used for these studies. Thus, the studies are extremely feasible in the near term.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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