Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Cardiac Engineering – Deciphering the Cardiome

To maintain cardiac health and prevent disease, there is a need to decipher the cardiome of cells and genes and use this knowledge (1) to better understand cardiac structure and function and (2) to engineer systems on the level of organs, organ systems, and the entire individual.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Improved CV health

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

new advances in study of the cardiome

Advances in in the sub-micro-world over the past several years have led to greater opportunities to better understand cells and genes. These new developments have and will continue to provide greater insight into understanding cardiac structure and function, which has and will likely to result in improved therapies for heart disease. The advances being made in science and technology have expanded the frontiers of cardiology as a result of important advances in micro-imagining and molecular diagnostic methods. These advances have transformed classical study of the macro-world of living human beings and the cardiac disease that afflict them.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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-16 net votes
10 up votes
26 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How should platelet (PLT) transfusions be used to treat active bleeding?

Multiple randomized controlled trials have been performed to evaluate the use of prophylactic PLT transfusions in non-bleeding, thrombocytopenic hematology-oncology patients. However no high-quality data exist to guide PLT transfusions in actively bleeding patients inclduing pediatric and adult medical and surgical patients. After hematology-oncology patients, cardiac surgery patients are the next largest group of PLT ...more »

Submitted by (@bldbuddy)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

PLT count is almost always the only laboratory result considered in deciding to transfuse PLTs. But PLT counts provide no information about PLT hemostatic function and its contribution to bleeding. A variety of in vitro coagulation tests have been developed: viscoelastography, whole blood PLT aggregometry, etc. But while testing-based transfusion algorithms may reduce blood product utilization, it has not been established that any in vitro test can either predict or help reduce bleeding. There is a gold standard method to assess clinical efficacy of transfused PLTs: incidence of grade 2 or higher bleeding in clinical trials of thrombocytopenic hematology-oncology patients receiving prophylactic PLT transfusions. No analogous gold standard of PLT hemostatic efficacy exists for therapeutic PLT transfusions to treat active bleeding. There is a pressing need to develop such a standard. Establishing reliable methods for evaluating the effects of PLT transfusion in actively bleeding patients will improve our understanding of how different factors (storage conditions, pathogen reduction etc.) affect the functional performance of PLTs.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

PLT transfusions are administered routinely to support bleeding pediatric and adult medical and surgical patients. Opportunities to conduct clinical trials in various settings (cardiac surgery, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, trauma, etc.) are widely available. PLT transfusion is commonly used to support bleeding patients receiving perioperative supportive therapies such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). These clinical situations represent critical opportunities to improve the care of bleeding patients. This approach will simultaneously facilitate comprehensive evaluation and validation of both current and novel in vitro tests of hemostasis. If a given in vitro test were reproducibly shown to correlate strongly with bleeding reduction caused by PLT transfusion, then by definition that would be a clinically meaningful test. Finally, this line of inquiry will allow assessment of the adverse effects of PLT transfusion in bleeding patients.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Terry Gernsheimer, University of Washington, for the 2015 NHLBI for the State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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44 up votes
14 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Inflammation and outcomes following pediatric cardiac operations

What is the contribution of the inflammatory response to postoperative recovery following pediatric cardiac operations and what strategies can improve outcomes?

Submitted by (@grahamem)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Congenital heart disease is the most common cause of birth defects, with about 40,000 new cases born per year in the US. Affected individuals experience morbidity and mortality that generate health and economic consequences significantly out of proportion to their numbers. An estimated 10,000 of these patients will undergo cardiac surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Furthermore, it is estimated that over 300,000 children in the US under age 21 have congenital cardiovascular disease and that 38% of these children will have had one or more surgical procedures. The use of CPB in neonates in particular has increased steadily over the past two decades. Further, neonates are generally sicker and consume more resources, including postoperative mechanical ventilation, ICU stay and hospital stay. Consequently, reducing the deleterious effects of CPB will have the largest impact in this group of patients.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Research has begun to assess the inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatrics. However, the magnitude and importance of its contribution to complicating postoperative recovery remains elusive. Clinical trials have begun to assess the efficacy of generalized anti-inflammatory therapies, typically steroids, with conflicting results. No therapy has been recognized as the standard of care. It’s critical that we improve our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of this inflammatory response and resulting derangements in vascular permeability and develop novel treatment strategies for infants and children undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass.

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1 net vote
16 up votes
15 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Neurocardiology – A Challenge for Prevention of CV Disease

There is a need to recognize and study the interdependencies between the brain/peripheral nervous system and the heart/vascular systems in health and disease to develop interventions to detect, treat, and prevent cardiovascular disease.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Effective new therapies for treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

long recognition of interactions between neural and CV system provide a wealth of background knowledge, while new imaging and electronic designs provide means for administering novel interventions.

Presently it is recognized that the autonomic nervous system plays a major role in the pathophysiology of arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD), and NHLBI supports ongoing studies to determine if modulation of nerves may provide an effective means to reduce the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias associated with SCD. Already, investigators have suggested that therapies such as right, left, or bilateral cerviocothoracic sympathectomy may provide a novel and cost effective intervention for the prevention of SCD. It is also well known that the sympathetic nervous system is activated during the onset and progression of heart failure. Currently investigators have proposed studies of specific central brain sites and the nerve supply to the heart during chronic heart failure progression to gain a better understanding of this pathway as a therapeutic target for the treatment of HF. This and the translation of results from similar studies is a challenge that should be encouraged.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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23 net votes
35 up votes
12 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Molecular basis for cardiac and neurological damage after cardiac arrest

What is the sequence and time course of molecular events that cause irreversible cardiovascular and neurologic dysfunction during and after cardiac arrest?

Submitted by (@rebecca.lehotzky)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : AHA Staff & Volunteers

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-4 net votes
1 up votes
5 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Optimizing therapeutic hypothermia

What is the optimal dose and duration of post-cardiac arrest hypothermic targeted temperature management?

Submitted by (@rebecca.lehotzky)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : AHA Staff & Volunteers

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-3 net votes
1 up votes
4 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulseless Electrical Activity (PEA) - replacing VF/VT

As VF/VT rates continue to decrease in cardiac arrest to levels below 25%, the importance of understanding the pathways and epidemiology of PEA gains public health importance. Additionally, there is a need to determine the co-morbidities and/or pharmacologic agents that contribute to the causation of this rhythm.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Greater understanding of PEA would lead to better treatment (good CPR only treatment currently) and higher survival rate in CA

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

How will be treat the majority of cardiac arrest when it becomes PEA?

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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-9 net votes
7 up votes
16 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Surveillance systems to prevent in-hospital cardiac arrest

Can surveillance systems be developed to prevent in-hospital cardiac arrest outside the ICU?

Submitted by (@rebecca.lehotzky)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : AHA Staff & Volunteers

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-1 net votes
2 up votes
3 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Personal surveillance to improve cardiac arrest outcomes

Can personal surveillance systems to prevent “unwitnessed” cardiac arrest improve outcomes?

Submitted by (@rebecca.lehotzky)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : AHA Staff & Volunteers

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-4 net votes
1 up votes
5 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Mechanisms of cardiac aging

The electrical and mechanical function of cardiac myocytes is compromised with age, but little is known about the age-related changes that occur within individual myocytes.

Submitted by (@catherine.proenza)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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19 net votes
32 up votes
13 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Cardiac Arrhythmia Factors

What are the genetic and neurohormonal factors associated with cardiac arrthymias, and how might these factors be controlled to reduce arrhythmia incidence? How do we identify patients who are at imminent risk of arrhythmic death?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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9 net votes
23 up votes
14 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Disparities in cardiac arrest care

How do we eliminate disparities in cardiac arrest care?

Submitted by (@rebecca.lehotzky)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : AHA Staff & Volunteers

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2 net votes
4 up votes
2 down votes
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