Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improving the Detection and Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis afflicts young adults, particularly African Americans and females, and often causes chronic disability or death. Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) was once considered to be a rare disease manifestation; however, with the development of improved diagnostic testing procedures, such as MRI and PET scans, CS is now known to afflict up to 40% of sarcoidosis patients and is recognized as a major cause of death. The current ...more »

Submitted by (@elliott.crouser)

Voting

-4 net votes
2 up votes
6 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Developing Standards of Care for adult muscular dystrophy (FSHD, DM) patients affected by hypercarbic respiratory insufficiency

There is an unmet need for the NHLBI to foster basic, preclinical and clinical research on the pulmonary consequences of respiratory insufficiency, and specifically with hypercarbic (high CO2) respiratory insufficiency, in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and other adult muscular dystrophies. The adult muscular dystrophies have received insufficient attention, both from research and clinical practice perspectives. ...more »

Submitted by (@daniel.perez)

Voting

-11 net votes
4 up votes
15 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improving Representation of the Elderly in Clinical Research

There is a need to optimize long-term cognitive and functional outcomes in the aging population during and after cardiothorasic surgery, including the development of simple, objective tools to enable risk stratification for vulnerability to neurocognitive deficit. First, cardiothoracic surgical trials and clinical studies should be more "age-representative" and reflect the increasing proportion of the aging population. ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Voting

24 net votes
37 up votes
13 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Problem of sudden cardiac death

Among major causes of cardiac mortality cardiac arrest stands as a cause of death that rivals all other causes in terms of frequency. There has been at best only modest improvement in resuscitation over recent years. No wonder with so little NHLBI funding going into this cause compared to acute MI and heart failure. Hopefully the IOM report on cardiac resuscition will be a call to action that will highlight these NIHBI ...more »

Submitted by (@mlw500)

Voting

0 net votes
4 up votes
4 down votes
Active