Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Systems biology and pathobiology

What are systems-based approaches to better define disease endotypes and develop more effective therapies, especially in multiple chronic conditions?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the role of chronic inflammation in lung complications in the HAART era?

With the advent of HAART HIV-infected subjects are living longer. Lung infectious complications so common in the early stages of the HIV epidemic have been replaced by those associated with chronic inflammation (COPD, pulmonary hypertension, lung cancer). Furthermore, this chronic inflammation is likely contributing to premature vascular complications (i.e coronary disease) seen in this population. All of these complications ...more »

Submitted by (@htwig0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Addressing the role of chronic inflammation in chronic lung and vascular diseases will impact both the HIV population and our growing U.S. aging population. Approaches to the question could include:

1.. Causes of chronic inflammation

- Antiretroviral drugs, persistent HIV, persistence of other viruses, exogenous retroviral elements, exosomes, other epidemiologic exposures

2. Downstream mechanistic effects of chronic inflammation

- Alterations in gene regulation, alterations in oxidative stress, direct tissue damage

3. Clinical outcomes of chronic inflammation

- Lung – COPD, pulmonary HTN, cancer, interstitial lung disease, asthma.

- Vascular compartment - premature coronary and vascular disease

- Does HIV-infection itself require alterations in treatment modalities for lung disease

- Does HIV infection itself alter the outcome of chronic lung disease?

4. Therapeutic options

- Directed against the cause – i.e. antivirals.

- Immune specific targets against inflammatory mediators

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The critical challenge for this question lies in the fact that complications caused by chronic inflammation such as COPD and coronary disease will by definition take years to develop. Intervention trials will take even longer. This is not like the early HIV epidemic, where complications were primarily infectious and could be seen and addressed quickly. Because of this chronic nature, it will necessary to try and establish cohorts with long term follow-up. Furthermore, it will be critical to have well defined appropriate HIV-uninfected cohorts to compare the HIV-infected population to.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Homer L. Twigg III on behalf of the INHALD Consortium

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Best Practices for implementation of guidelines in COPD community care

How can guideline recommendations be implemented into community practice in a way that is feasible, usable, relevant, and cost-effective? (examples are use of care management, translation of chronic care model, and EMR based tools)

Submitted by (@swilliams1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Stephanie Williams, Community Program Manager, COPD Foundation

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Build a National Surveillance of Chronic CV and Lung Diseases

There is a need to build a robust coordinated surveillance system on the incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases. Surveillance data are needed to: •Describe and monitor the burden, trends, and patterns of these diseases •Set parameters and metrics of research priorities •Identify where to target resources for prevention, treatment, and delivery of care •Track and monitor progress toward public health disease ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The high prevalence of chronic cardiovascular and lung diseases has created burden in increasing healthcare costs and high mortality rates in the US compared to other developed countries. Even so, they remain among the most preventable health problems. A national surveillance system for chronic cardiovascular and lung diseases would enable data-driven decision-making about public health strategies for prevention, management, and cost containment.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

A 2011 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report concluded that a coordinated surveillance system is needed. It proposed a framework for such a system that would integrate existing information through collective efforts of multiple stakeholders. The time is right to gain from and build upon numerous ongoing broad initiatives in biomedical Big Data, including growing health IT adoption mandated by the HITECH Act, ONCHIT efforts to achieve health IT interoperability, the NIH BD2K initiative, and the multiorganizational network participating in FDA Mini-Sentinel, HCS Collaboratory, and PCORnet, among others. The NHLBI is well-positioned to lead, develop and implement the IOM’s recommended framework and system. (IOM report - http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2011/A-Nationwide-Framework-for-Surveillance-of-Cardiovascular-and-Chronic-Lung-Diseases.aspx)

Existing data sources (i.e., population surveys, registries, cohort studies, administrative data, and vital statistics) do not individually provide nationally representative data, cannot be linked, and are not currently readily accessible to all levels of users. One potential way to build such a system is to integrate and expand existing data sources.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we better understand regional tissue heterogeneity in lung disease?

Many lung diseases (IPF, COPD) are characterized by marked heterogeneity at the tissue level. Unfortunately, most of the tools we currently employ to understand lung disease are unable to elucidate the mechanisms that result in regional heterogeneity. Clinical studies and animal models, while invaluable, generally assume that all lung tissue is similarly affected based on the presence or absence of diagnostic criteria ...more »

Submitted by (@bradley.richmond)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Emerging evidence suggests that diseases such as IPF and COPD have observable phenotypes at the cellular and tissue levels long before the disease is clinically apparent. Thus seemingly healthy patients may have some regions of the lung affected by the same pathophysiologic processes that drive clinically apparent disease. By changing the focus of investigation from the presence or absence of disease in a given patient to the presence of absence of disease in a given region, several advantages emerge: (1) pathophysiologic mechanisms may be investigated earlier in the natural history of a disease, when interventions are more likely to be of benefit; (2) early investigation favors the discovery of distinct disease subgroups that are masked in more severe disease; and (3) a single patient may provide multiple affected and unaffected disease regions, allowing him or her to serve as their own control. Recently, advances in next-generation sequencing have made it possible for the entire transcriptome of a single cell to be analyzed. It is reasonable to believe that in the next 10 years single cell epigenome, proteome, and metabolome profiling will become routine. However, it seems less obvious how these methodologies can be employed to better understand the drivers of regional differences in lung disease. While technically difficult, studies applying high-throughput technologies to the discovery of regional differences will be invaluable to our understanding of lung disease.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

To address this critical challenge, at least five technological hurdles will have to be addressed: (1) technologies such as laser capture microdissection which allow for the isolation or cells from specific areas of the lung will need to improve; (2) technologies allowing for culture of multiple cell types on a single artificial substrate (to allow for experimental manipulation of cellular “communities”) will need to emerge; (3) collaborative networks will need to emerge whereby datasets from multiple labs can be integrated; (4) bioinformatics and statistical methods capable of filtering massive “omics” data sets from multiple cell types will need to be refined; and (5) researchers with the skills necessary to distil large descriptive datasets into testable hypotheses will need to be trained. While these hurdles are great, they must be overcome in order to translate the promise of next-generation sequencing techniques into an improved understanding of the drivers of regional heterogeneity in lung disease.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Bradley Richmond

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26 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Systems Approaches to "Phenosimilar" Diseases

There are diverse diseases that share similar features. For example, many chronic airways diseases (chronic aspiration, ciliary dyskinesia, some COPD) "phenocopy" cystic fibrosis in terms of infectious agents, mucus clearance problems, progressive loss of lung function, etc. Use multiplatform "omics" approaches and Big Data bioinformatics to identify common nodes for therapeutic targeting. Other examples: emphysema and ...more »

Submitted by (@jhagood)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

may be able to target multiple diseases with new or repurposed therapies. Might narrow down the broad array of potential "high value" targets to study.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Lack of Collaboration Across NIH Institutes

There are many significant questions in CVD prevention that cross the disciplines represented by the different institutes. For example, the obesity epidemic, poor nutrition, and physical inactivity are relevant to CVD, neurological disease, diabetes, and cancer. Tobacco use is directly relevant to cancer and CVD. Social determinants and disparities affect multiple diseases and outcomes. Reducing obesity will require interventions ...more »

Submitted by (@stephen.fortmann)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Two or more collaborating NIH Institutes could afford to fund creative projects that neither institute can afford alone.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

NIH Institutes have a long history of isolation from one another. This has undoubtedly suppressed creativity and interdisciplinary research. It is inherently bureaucratic and reflects poorly on science. As an outsider I can only speculate about how to address this issue, but it would be well worth some attention at the highest levels.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Stephen P. Fortmann

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7 up votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Coordination of COPD care when comorbidities are present

How should providers coordinate management strategies and treatment goals in patients with COPD and other co-existing chronic diseases?

Submitted by (@jsullivan)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Janice Cotton, COPD Foundation State Captain for IL, PPRN Governing Board Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Non-Adherence of Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases

There are various reasons responsible for patients’ non-adherence. One of them is insufficient or lack of education about medications and equipment required for their treatment.

Submitted by (@vlady.rozenbaum)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

There is a critical need to develop uniform guidelines and handouts addressing the confusion over the proper use of medications (particularly inhalers) and equipment (i.e. oxygen). Improper use leads to diminished or no benefit, frustration, and, ultimately, even to a patient's decision to stop the treatment.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This is an issue that has been universally acknowledged for a number of years. With the help of patient focus groups, convened at the NHLBI, national pulmonological conferences, or at local venues around the country, appropriate materials can be created to benefit patients and reduce a huge burden on nation's economy due to decreased productivity and increase in hospital admissions.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : COPD-ALERT

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Identification and validation of surrogate endpoints for long-term morbidity in Sickle Cell Disease

Research in sickle cell disease (SCD) has mostly focused on preventing or treating acute medical events, such as vaso-occlusive pain, acute chest syndrome, and, in pediatric patients, acute strokes. Chronic SCD complications such as chronic kidney disease or pulmonary hypertension, develop over decades, thus are poor choices for clinical trial endpoints. There is a great need to develop surrogate endpoints that predict ...more »

Submitted by (@hulbertm)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Longitudinal cohorts of SCD patients, spanning childhood and adulthood, with biobanking DNA, plasma, and serum, and standardized clinical and imaging assessments will allow identification predictors of negative clinical outcomes. An NHLBI-funded national SCD clinical registry with biobanking will be necessary to validate any surrogate endpoints.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Monica Hulbert

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