Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

HEALTH CARE DISPARITIES IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF COMMON SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is evidence of a higher prevalence of sleep and circadian disorders in different ethnic groups. This is true for both adult and pediatric subjects. There is also evidence that minority populations in lower socioeconomic groups do not seek evaluation for sleep disorders as frequently as other segments of our population. There is also evidence that they are less adherent to treatments such as nasal CPAP for obstructive ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@nma120)

Understanding of chronobiological systems

We know that all life functions are based on circadian and other rhythms; chronobiological systems are interdependent in intricate ways. Disturbances and disorders in one part of a system may affect other vital systems in unexpected but far-reaching ways. Many aspects of circadian rhythms and sleep-wake regulation in normal, healthy humans have been charted. Much of the knowledge thus gained is assumed to be valid also ...more »

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

NOVEL APPROACHES TO TRAINING IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN RESEARCH

Sleep and circadian disorders are relatively new areas of medicine. Most universities currently lack a critical mass of investigators to develop institutional T32 grants. Thus, there are, unfortunately, few such programs nationally. The Sleep Research Society has recognized this and is taking active steps to facilitate development of other T32 institutional training grants. This will not, however, help the majority ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@peter0)

Elucidate the different causes of circadian disorders, and tailor the treatment to the cause

There are several possible physiological causes of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders (CRSWDs), including lack of sensitivity to light, over-sensitivity to light, deficiencies in the ipRGC cells of the retina, lack of melatonin production, long elimination time of melatonin, long intrinsic circadian period, differences in timing of sleep relative to internal circadian rhythms, differences in tolerance to phase mismatch, ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@susanpl)

Improve ineffective treatments for circadian rhythm disorders

I have extreme delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD), a circadian rhythm disorder (CRD). I fall asleep at dawn and wake up early afternoon. My dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) is at 5:30 am. A normal person’s DLMO may be at 9 pm, for example. CRD treatment—prolonged bright light after temperature nadir, dark restriction/melatonin starting several hours before natural bedtime, darkness till temperature nadir—does not work ...more »

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

ELUCIDATING BASIC MECHANISMS OF SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION ON HEALTH THROUGH THE LIFESPAN

There are developing data from clinical studies that sleep deficiency and circadian disruption have multiple adverse consequences for health. The clinical data provide the base for mechanistic studies. Studies in animal models indicate that both circadian disruption and insufficient sleep later gene expression in peripheral tissues. Moreover, the effect of sleep loss in molecular changes in brain changes with age. ...more »

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@apollia112)

Do our modern "traditional" sleep schedules defy nature?

Here's an interesting article which shows that the modern tradition of eight hours of unbroken sleep might actually be unnatural, and quite different from what our ancestors typically did: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-16964783 So, maybe the majority of our modern societies (even the people without recognized sleep disorders) are unwisely fighting against biology? Perhaps a lot of people's health issues, such as ...more »

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

DESIGN AND EVALUATE INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE SLEEP HEALTH AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Data indicate the association between short sleep and circadian disruption on a number of adverse outcomes such as cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, hypertension, etc. There is a need to move beyond association to interventions that can be shown to improve sleep duration and circadian disruption.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

DEVELOPMENT OF A PERSONALIZED APPROACH TO SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is developing evidence of major individual differences in pathways to different common sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. Moreover, there is evidence of different clinical presentations of disease and different outcomes. For example, some subjects with obstructive sleep apnea who get excessive sleepiness while others do not. The latter are still at risk for other consequences of the disorder such ...more »

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMARKERS FOR SLEEP INSUFFICIENCY, CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION AND SLEEP DISORDERS

There is an urgent need to develop quantifiable biomarkers for acute sleep loss, chronic sleep insufficiency, circadian disruption and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. These problems are highly prevalent but currently we do not have biomarkers to use for case identification, prognosis, or assessing response to therapy. There are currently small studies that indicate the feasibility. A recent workshop ...more »

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