Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Transforming Transplantation with RISC

What is necessary to reprogram the immune system to improve transplant outcomes of hearts, lungs, and hematopoietic cells? While NIAID is a major funder of immunology research, we are a major contributor to stem cell research. Our resources could be combined, where NIAID would support this approach for autoimmune diseases, and we would support work in tolerance for transplants. If the NCI also wants to collaborate on ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This innovative and transformative proposal could improve tolerance to many different types of transplants.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

In 2002, Hochedlinger and Jaenisch (Nature 415:1035-1038) created a mouse by nuclear transplantation from a mature B-cell. This was proof of principle that the immune system can be reprogrammed entirely. Since then there has been little work in this area, but Reprogramming Immune System Cells (RISC) is risky but promising.

A second approach involves mechanisms that cancer cells use to evade immune detection. While most cancer research works to restore immune competence for therapy, the basic biology of evading immune detection could be exploited to improve tolerance. These approaches could be tested in an animal model in 5 years.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

-3 net votes
15 up votes
18 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Leveraging Networks of Federally Qualified Healthcare Centers

How best do we leverage the existing Federally Qualified Healthcare Center’s (FQHC) infrastructure to study T4 Implementation Research for heart, lung, blood, sleep diseases and conditions among high risk and vulnerable populations?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

• Develop strategies to reduced Health Inequities

• Potentially be scaled up across an entire health system with huge population impact

• Studies would be done in the environment and context where the findings with be implemented leading to better uptake and sustainability.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

• Formative FQHC groups are already being organized but do not have strong leadership and support

• FQHCs have ready access to the high risk and vulnerable populations that would benefit most from the research

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

-14 net votes
7 up votes
21 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Number of clinical scientists

How can we insure that there are sufficient numbers of clinical scientists over the next 20 years?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

Voting

2 net votes
2 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Heterogeneity in Asthma Phenotypes

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan: Asthma appears to be due to heterogenous etiologies.  To better characterize the various phenotypes and potential etiologies, it would be important to create more epidemiologic and biomarker focused databases, which could ...more »

Submitted by (@wheeze)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mitchell Grayson on behalf of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Voting

-12 net votes
6 up votes
18 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Embedding Clinical Trials in Learning Health Systems

What are the best methods for using genotype information and other EMR data to randomize heart, lung, blood, sleep patients to different treatment strategies? One big challenge is how to consent patients for this sort of trial. Must patients be consented separately for every such trial or could there be blanket consent for participating in the learning health care model? This would also require a paradigm shift in how ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

If successful this approach should enable the conduct of cheap pragmatic trials that are fueled by data from clinical care. The integration into clinical care helps assure efficiency and generalizability of results.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The advent of electronic medical records and the explosion of big data technology has made it possible to gain access to and analyze data in a manner that would have been unthinkable 10 years ago. This is already going on in other fields.

Health care systems are increasingly using "big data" approaches to track outcomes in the patients treated with different strategies and drugs, and apply the knowledge gained from outcomes in previous patients to inform decision making in subsequent patients ("learning"). This approach could be used to personalize treatment. A recent example from cancer is to genotype lung tumors, and tailor the treatment of a new patients to drugs producing good results in patients with similar tumor genotypes. When two or more treatments produce similar results, one could randomize. Cardiovascular disease presents a challenge in using genotyping information to personalize treatment, because the manifestations are the results of complex genetic and environmental risk factors.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

4 net votes
15 up votes
11 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Risk-benefit of oral hypoglycemic medication in type 2 diabetes

Is an increase in macrovascular endpoints outweighed by the benefit in microvascular end points in new oral type 2 diabetes drugs?

 

It would go against the current regulatory paradigm in type 2 diabetes. Although drug companies do not like the current paradigm, they would prefer to go back to the pre-rosiglitazone state of affairs, in which new drugs had only to prove that they lowered blood glucose and HbA1c.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Trials along this line would create a new and more rational paradigm to evaluate the cardiovascular safety of new oral hypoglycemic agents in type 2 diabetes in the context of their incremental benefit in preventing microvascular complications.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Some of the newer oral meds for treating type 2 diabetes, starting with rosiglitazone, have shown no benefit on clinical macrovascular end points, particularly heart failure. The FDA has responded to this by requiring new drugs to undergo large non-inferiority trials demonstrating that these drugs cause no more than a 30% increase in macrovascular endpoints as a precondition for approval. Yet there is no requirement that microvascular events (renal dysfunction and failure, neuropathy, retinopathy and visual loss) even be documented in these trials. So we are allowing new agents like alogliptin and sitogliptin to be marketed without any direct evidence that they do anything good for patients other than lowering glucose and HbA1c levels and with some evidence of adverse CV effects. While it is reasonable to assume that surrogates like lower glucose and HbA1c will translate to reduction in microvascular events, this assumption is based on old studies using different classes of drugs in a different disease population and environment. Even if HbA1c and glucose remain good qualitative surrogates, there is no way to quantitatively compare benefits versus risks of new hypoglycemic drugs compared to placebo or other drugs. Novel statistical methods to look at weighted composites of microvascular and macrovascular endpoints would enable the key question of net benefit to be addressed with a reasonable sample size.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

-7 net votes
9 up votes
16 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Definitive Evidence of the Effectiveness of Pulmonary Rehabilitation

What is the clinical effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation in reducing hospital admissions and readmissions, improving health outcomes such as exercise tolerance and dyspnea, and positively impacting patient centered outcomes. Does this effectiveness vary based on the types of settings rehab is conducted in, urban vs rural environments, the components to the program, the timing of the program and the overall support ...more »

Submitted by (@gacdk0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Pulmonary rehabilitation is a critical component in the treatment of COPD patients but several barriers persist that have resulted in very limited access to rehab, low referral rates for eligible patients and limited standardization of best practices within the rehab facilities that do exist. Large, definitive studies accounting for patient subgroups, site characteristics and program components can generate the level of evidence needed to expand access, educate providers and improve referral systems and create quality programs. This level of evidence is necessary to change policy to properly value the role of pulmonary rehabilitation and to convince integrated health systems in a value based market that pulmonary rehabilitation is beyond a doubt, a requirement of providing quality COPD care.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Grace Anne Dorney Koppel, COPD Foundation Board of Directors, COPD Patient Advocate

Voting

9 net votes
12 up votes
3 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Improving Drug Safety through Precompetitive Research

The lack of transparency in Pharma clinical studies and the incomplete knowledge of the effect of genetic profiles and pharmacological factors on drug toxicities are challenges in decreasing drug development costs and increasing drug safety.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Precompetitive research and collaborations directed at improving our understanding of the factors underlying adverse patient responses to investigational heart, lung, blood, sleep drugs will help to expedite the drug development process, increase probabilities of success and reduce product development costs.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Several public-private initiatives such as The Predictive Safety Testing Consortium and the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium are underway that address components of this problem. NHLBI can join existing initiatives or formulate its own. In either case, NHLBI’s participation as either an honest broker or a funding source will enable substantive progress on several fronts over a 5-10 year period.

Clinical safety complications and chronic exposure toxicities are a major cause of drug trial failures and recalls and thereby contribute to the high cost of pharmaceutical product development and the rising prices of commercial medicines. Safety problems can usually be attributed to the off-target biological effects of drug compounds or their metabolites. Reducing the safety risks associated with drug development will therefore require us to expand our knowledge around the pharmacological and pharmacogenomic factors underlying adverse safety events. Furthermore, adverse events that occur during clinical studies that are conducted by pharmaceutical companies are not usually shared publicly. This lack of transparency contributes to unnecessary inefficiencies and costs in the drug development process.

Mechanisms for minimizing safety hurdles in drug development include funding precompetitive applied research and promoting collaborations among companies to encourage sharing of clinical failure data.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

-4 net votes
13 up votes
17 down votes
Active

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Transforming Transplantation with Reprogramming Immune System Cells (RISC)

Can we "reprogram" the immune system to improve outcomes of heart, lung, and hematopoietic cell transplants? While NIAID is a major funder of immunology research, we are a major contributor to stem cell research. Our resources could be combined, where NIAID would support this approach for autoimmune diseases, and we would support work in tolerance for transplants. If the NCI also wants to collaborate on co-stimulatory ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This innovative and transformative proposal could improve tolerance to many different types of transplants.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

In 2002, Hochedlinger and Jaenisch (Nature 415:1035-1038) created a mouse by nuclear transplantation from a mature B-cell. This was proof of principle that the immune system can be reprogrammed entirely. Since then there has been little work in this area, but Reprogramming Immune System Cells (RISC) is risky but promising.

A second approach involves mechanisms that cancer cells use to evade immune detection. While most cancer research works to restore immune competence for therapy, the basic biology of evading immune detection could be exploited to improve tolerance. These approaches could be tested in an animal model in 5 years.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

15 net votes
27 up votes
12 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Clinical Trial Methodology

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan:

 

Are the current methodologies for clinical trials still the best practices for conducting efficient clinical trials?

Submitted by (@wheeze)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mitchell Grayson on behalf of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Voting

2 net votes
15 up votes
13 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Training of Clinical & Translational Scientists

Although the NCRR and NIGMS used to have a mechanism to train new generation of clinical & translational scientists, this program was stopped. Why?

What is the possibility of other institutes to come up with the priority of funding resources in this regard?

Submitted by (@dkagr0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

In view of the health care models, strong control of insurance companies in determining the remuneration, lack of protective time for qualified clinicians to continue their research, no incentive to the institute for promoting such activities, lack of available tenure-track jobs, pool of effective and well-trained clinical & translational researchers is decreasing rapidly. Even though NIH invests resources to train MD-PhD students, a very minor pool of these graduates continue curiosity and passion in advancing new knowledge and discovering newer approaches.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

1. Additional resources must be developed by NHLBI, NIAID, NIDDK and other major institutes to support this endeavor.

2. Institutes/medical schools who provide protective time to their faculty to continue their efforts in clinical & translational research, must be acknowledged and incentivized.

3. There has been no effective way of measuring outcomes from such investments. All of us must take ownership in utilizing the resources more effectively and more productively.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Devendra K. Agrawal, PhD

Voting

31 net votes
38 up votes
7 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Research in new methods for large simple trials

We need new ideas in how to make clinical trials more efficient and cost effective. (Randomized) comparison of different methods for accrual might be of interest; blinded versus unblinded trials; behavioral controls versus placebo controls or usual care controls might be explored.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This will aid our discussions of appropriate trials to fund.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

We need some answers in order to continue to fund the best possible trials with our limited resources.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

7 net votes
16 up votes
9 down votes
Active