Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we better understand regional tissue heterogeneity in lung disease?

Many lung diseases (IPF, COPD) are characterized by marked heterogeneity at the tissue level. Unfortunately, most of the tools we currently employ to understand lung disease are unable to elucidate the mechanisms that result in regional heterogeneity. Clinical studies and animal models, while invaluable, generally assume that all lung tissue is similarly affected based on the presence or absence of diagnostic criteria ...more »

Submitted by (@bradley.richmond)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Emerging evidence suggests that diseases such as IPF and COPD have observable phenotypes at the cellular and tissue levels long before the disease is clinically apparent. Thus seemingly healthy patients may have some regions of the lung affected by the same pathophysiologic processes that drive clinically apparent disease. By changing the focus of investigation from the presence or absence of disease in a given patient to the presence of absence of disease in a given region, several advantages emerge: (1) pathophysiologic mechanisms may be investigated earlier in the natural history of a disease, when interventions are more likely to be of benefit; (2) early investigation favors the discovery of distinct disease subgroups that are masked in more severe disease; and (3) a single patient may provide multiple affected and unaffected disease regions, allowing him or her to serve as their own control. Recently, advances in next-generation sequencing have made it possible for the entire transcriptome of a single cell to be analyzed. It is reasonable to believe that in the next 10 years single cell epigenome, proteome, and metabolome profiling will become routine. However, it seems less obvious how these methodologies can be employed to better understand the drivers of regional differences in lung disease. While technically difficult, studies applying high-throughput technologies to the discovery of regional differences will be invaluable to our understanding of lung disease.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

To address this critical challenge, at least five technological hurdles will have to be addressed: (1) technologies such as laser capture microdissection which allow for the isolation or cells from specific areas of the lung will need to improve; (2) technologies allowing for culture of multiple cell types on a single artificial substrate (to allow for experimental manipulation of cellular “communities”) will need to emerge; (3) collaborative networks will need to emerge whereby datasets from multiple labs can be integrated; (4) bioinformatics and statistical methods capable of filtering massive “omics” data sets from multiple cell types will need to be refined; and (5) researchers with the skills necessary to distil large descriptive datasets into testable hypotheses will need to be trained. While these hurdles are great, they must be overcome in order to translate the promise of next-generation sequencing techniques into an improved understanding of the drivers of regional heterogeneity in lung disease.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Bradley Richmond

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Prevent the Development of COPD

What can be done to prevent the development of COPD in individuals at increased risk. Quitting smoking before the development of COPD can prevent COPD development. What can be done to prevent COPD for individuals with other identified ris factors

Submitted by (@jsullivan)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Several risk factors have been identified that identify individuals at risk for developing COPD including low birth weight, poor maximally attained lung function and the presence of asthma. Strategies to prevent COPD development in these individuals are needed.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The Lung Health Study demonstrated that smoking cessation prevents COPD progression. Studies of similar size and duration should be organized to address other risk factors.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : COPD Foundation, COPDF MASAC

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15 net votes
18 up votes
3 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Integrated healthcare strategies during transitions in COPD care

Integrated healthcare strategies during transitions in COPD care

 

• What is cost effectiveness of multi-component COPD programs?

 

• Will early admission to a Pulmonary Rehabilitation program following a hospitalization for COPD reduce the likelihood of readmission within the following year?

 

• What is the most effective time to implement the transition from hospitalization following a COPD exacerbation admission?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Brief vs. teach-to-goal interventions in teaching patients with COPD to use inhalers

What is the comparative effectiveness of brief interventions to teach patients respiratory inhaler use (e.g., verbal and written instructions) vs. teach-to-goal interventions (brief interventions plus demonstration of correct technique, patient teach-back, feedback, and repeat instruction if needed) on respiratory inhaler technique and patient-reported outcomes (symptom frequency, activities of daily living, quality of ...more »

Submitted by (@jimandmarynelson)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Respiratory inhalers come in a staggering array of types, contents, and methods of use. It is not uncommon for the COPD patient to use two or more types of inhalers each day. The misuse of the application of these devices is rampant, due to confusion, forgetfulness, or lack of proper education in their use. If multiple inhalers are used by the patient, many of them must be used in a particular order, and the inhalation methods may will be vastly different.

Understanding on the part of the patient and/or caregiver begins with the initial instruction in the use of inhalers by medical personnel. They must find, and use, methods of instruction that are understandable and retainable by the patient.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The study of comparing the two type of instruction is entirely feasible, while the challenges lie with studying a large enough sample of patients to encompass the ranges of COPD stages, mental capacity, and degree of compliance of the patients.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Jim Nelson - Patient, Arizona State Advocacy Captain

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16 up votes
3 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

COPD care

What is the standard of care for stable COPD and acute exacerbation of COPD that should constitute the reference base for clinical trials?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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11 net votes
23 up votes
12 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

The use of administrative and billing data in COPD care quality improvement

What is the validity of administrative/billing data to evaluate the quality of COPD care as part of quality improvement initiatives? What care practices can be assessed using these data?

Submitted by (@ngrude)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Nina Bracken, COPD Foundation advocate

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2 net votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

COPD exacerbations

COPD exacerbations

a. Better tools for early recognition

b. More research in self-management and communications technology to assist patients

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

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3 net votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Quantitative imaging biomarkers for chronic lung disease

Critical Challenge

Submitted by (@str0001)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Methods for stratifying patients with diffuse lung disease are crucial for predicting their clinical course and directing appropriate therapies accordingly. Currently imaging markers for prognostic stratification are limited, due to observer variability in characterizing the type and degree of computed tomography (CT) abnormalities. A reproducible method for categorizing varying diffuse lung diseases on CT imaging is needed, particularly in combination with other biomarkers in a multidisciplinary approach. With lung cancer screening, the characterization and stratification of patients with varying COPD phenotypes and interstitial lung disease are essential to aid in management of the large number of patients who currently satisfy criteria for CT lung cancer screening.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Currently the classification of diffuse lung disease on CT is based upon visual evaluation and qualitative or semi-quantitative evaluation of CT data. Diffuse lung disease manifests with varying CT findings and distribution within the lung. Computer-assisted tools for quantifying airways and parenchymal disease have been developed. More-sophisticated quantitative computer image-analysis methods, such as those that address three-dimensional spatial orientation, are possible given advances in computer capabilities yet remain in need of further development. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MR) technology, positron emission tomography (PET), and PET/MR will increase the ability to characterize diffuse lung disease quantitatively. The ability of such technology to differentiate subtypes within more frequently occurring and clinically-significant diffuse lung disease is feasible. Such tools would impact a large population, particularly given the potential need to phenotype emphysema and smoking-related interstitial pneumonias in those undergoing CT screening.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Thoracic Radiology

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7 net votes
9 up votes
2 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Novel Treatments for COPD

COPD is a major health problem leading to 140,000 deaths in the United States. Treatments are supportive, but there is a compelling need for treatments that modify the progression of the disease and that prevent exacerbations. There needs to be a research infrastructure that unites basic, translational, and clinical researchers to develop new approaches. Although this challenge had been met in the past with the now ...more »

Submitted by (@rwise0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Robert A. Wise

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16 net votes
23 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Can normoxemic patients with COPD benefit from oxygen supplementation?

Can normoxemic patients with COPD benefit from oxygen supplementation?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

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3 net votes
3 up votes
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