Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Molecular determinants of pulmonary failure in sepsis

Respiratory failure in sepsis is almost universal and leads to worse clinical outcomes, yet it is poorly understood. Recent epidemics of pulmonary failure from respiratory viruses (e.g. influenza, SARS, MERS, etc) makes understanding molecular determinants of respiratory failure and the associated inflammatory and physiologic responses, critical for improving the health of our nation and potentially mitigating future ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Exploring and understanding the molecular determinants of pulmonary failure will impact not only the predictable complications of acute respiratory illnesses such as influenza, but also inform our understanidng and treatment of myriad other common respiratory illnesses resulting in pulmonary failure, such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, obesity hypoventilation, etc.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Patients receiving critical care services in the United States are among the most close monitored, including continuous monitoring of cardiorespiratory physiology. This highly monitored population is a nature source for studying longitudinal changes in molecular patterns and respiratory physiology.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

Voting

6 net votes
9 up votes
3 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

“Change of culture” studies

Large scale implementation of “change of culture” studies by which to revamp the approach to early removal of sedation and mechanical ventilation, coupled with monitoring of the brain and early mobility.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

Voting

1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What are the molecular mechanisms of lung injury, and how do they differ in children?

Both adults and children have significant morbidity and mortality due to lung injury, but have different etiologies and outcomes. It is possible that the underlying pathobiology in the two groups is different. There are no targeted therapies for lung injury, indicating that the cause is still not understood.

Submitted by (@rft2106)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Mortality rates for acute lung injury in pediatrics vary from about 10-30%. Immunosuppressed patients and those with cancer have higher rates. Morbidity following long ICU stays have social impacts on family and education, and can put patients at risk of future lung complications.

 

Though ECMO shows promise of improving outcomes, large clinical studies are lacking. ECMO is also fraught with signifiant risks and high costs. A molecular understanding of the pathobiology of lung injury could lead to specific therapies to improve survival and decrease morbidity.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

(1) The heterogeneity of both adults and children with lung injury hinders the applicability of clinical and translational studies. (2) Reliable animal models of pediatric lung injury are lacking.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Rebecca Turcotte

Voting

4 net votes
4 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Optimal hemoglobin threshold for transfusion in children with ARDS?

Do different hemoglobin transfusion thresholds alter outcomes in children with ARDS? What is the optimal *minimum* transfusion threshold for children with ARDS? What patient-centered outcomes can be affected by transfusion strategies: ventilator free days, time to organ function recovery, duration of intensive care stay, survival?

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

Voting

8 net votes
9 up votes
1 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

National network to study the pathobiology of sepsis

Sepsis is the leading cause of death in hospitalized patients, the 3rd leading cause of death in all people in the US, the most common condition leading to widespread vascular collapse, among the most common causes of respiratory failure, and a frequent cause of acute cardiac dysfunction.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Developing a national network to address important aspects of sepsis (causes and consequences of cardiac dysfunction, molecular determinants of respiratory failure) and serve as a trials group for testing novel interventions for new discoveries.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

Voting

2 net votes
4 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pathogenesis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in survivors of critical illness.

Acute cardiovascular complications are frequent in critical illness and injury, occurring on a spectrum that includes troponin leak or demand ischemia to acute occlusive coronary events and lethal arrhythmias. They arise in the course of similar acute illnesses but they epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment and long-term consequences are unknown. Are they the result of a generalized inflammatory state that persists ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Complications of critical illness are frequent and the most common are cardiovascular in nature but not well understood. Understanding the pathogenesis of these consequences will lead to improve treatments, acute survival of critical illness and injury, and improved long-term outcomes.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Patients receiving critical care services in the United States are among the most close monitored, including continuous monitoring of cardiorespiratory physiology. Integrating high dimensional data from ICU data streams and applying big data analytics, in combination with primetime genomic and metabolomic technologies, makes this question imminently feasible.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

Voting

1 net vote
3 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

NIH trans-IC office of critical care research

Would an NIH trans-IC office of critical care research improve coordination and strategic planning across?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

Voting

1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Vasopressin layered on to norepinephrine treatment for septic shock

We know that vasopressin layered on to norepinephrine treatment for septic shock tends to produce better outcomes (VASST trial, Russell et al) than norepinephrine alone. We still need to know if norepinephrine should be first line or if vasopressin should be first line (and perhaps monotherapy) for septic shock.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

Voting

1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Role of sleep quality in critical care

Would improving sleep and circadian rhythms in the critical care setting result in improved patient outcomes (e.g., reduce severity of infection, duration of intubation, length of hospital stay)?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

71 net votes
98 up votes
27 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Phenotyping patients with respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation

What is the most effective way to phenotype (classify) patients with respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

Voting

1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

National ARDS Registry

ARDS remains one of the most common and lethal forms of respiratory failure in critically ill patients. Improvements in understanding the pathogenesis has not led to effective treatments, and heterogeneity of the condition precludes major advances. A national registry would serve to improve understanding of epidemiology, disease characterization (for definitions) and can identify incidence, outcome, disparities, treatment ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Can be modeled on the ARDS/PETAL Network, but more broadly implemented for epidemiology and pragmatic studies.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

Voting

1 net vote
2 up votes
1 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Addition of albumin to fluid conservative management of AL

Does the addition of albumin to fluid conservative management of ALI (ARDSnet FACTT trial protocol, Wiedemann et al) further shorten ventilator time and/or improve survival?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : American Thoracic Society member

Voting

1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
Active