Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Preparing a Diverse Biomedical Technology Development Workforce

How do we best develop a scientific workforce that is fluent in product development and commercialization issues? How can NHLBI best expand the training opportunities for early career scientists to prepare them for entry into the dynamic biomedical workforce landscape? There is a need for scientifically-trained experts from diverse backgrounds who also understand business needs relevant to biomedical technology development, ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Voting

0 net votes
19 up votes
19 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Career Development in "Group Based" Science

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan:

 

NHLBI should be challenged on how best to provide career development grants to junior faculty involved in “group based” clinical and bench science.

Submitted by (@wheeze)

Voting

7 net votes
26 up votes
19 down votes
Active

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Intersecting Developmental Biology with Vascular Physiology and Biology

Although many think of the vasculature as a lump sum of vessels that all react in a similar fashion to a certain stimulus, e.g., alpha-adrenergic activation, this is not the situation. For example, coronary resistance vessels show little to no direct response to alpha-adrenergic activation while resistance vessels in most organs show marked constriction. Another example is the response of different vessels to angioplasty ...more »

Submitted by (@wchilian)

Voting

15 net votes
26 up votes
11 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fetal basis for Adult Disease

Maternal exposures during pregnancy have the potential to alter development and lead to lifelong susceptibility to disease. There is epidemiological evidence of this in the asthma field, where maternal smoking leads to increased asthma rates. However, the molecular mechanisms by which maternal exposures cause lung disease later in life are not known and the influence of in utero exposures on susceptibility to lung cancer, ...more »

Submitted by (@dc0000)

Voting

10 net votes
17 up votes
7 down votes
Active