Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Repair and Regenerate the Kidney

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) affects millions in the US, and is one of the new diseases on the rise globally. New therapies to slow CKD and to repair and regenerate failing kidneys are drastically needed to reduce health care costs and improve lives.

Submitted by (@ceci00)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the role of diet and nutrition in treatment, management and prevention of Heart Failure?

Heart Failure (HF) remains a major public health burden. A working group was convened by NHLBI and ODS in June, 2013 to address the role of diet and nutrition in management of HF. A review of existing evidence produced no clear rationale for appropriate dietary interventions. On the contrary, the group developed recommendations for conducting additional research specifically on the role of sodium, fluid, nutrients, and ...more »

Submitted by (@lvanhorn)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Predict the needs for inter and intra-hospital transfer for acute care surgery patients with respiratory failure

Density mapping of the need and flow of patients requiring acute care surgery vis-a-vis inter-facility transfer, care hand-off failures, post-acute care resource mismatch to articulate a funding plan resource allocation and development akin to what has been done for trauma care.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What do we know about Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF)

Mortality is similar between HFpEF and HFrEF but we have currently no viable therapeutic option for HFpEF. There have been many large trials, but they all failed. Our basic understanding of the disease is very limited which contributed to failures of many prior trials and wasting $$$. We know very little about the pathophysiology of the disease . It is time to get back to the basic science and use our new tools (e.g. ...more »

Submitted by (@rezanezafat)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the optimal management of coronary artery disease in patients with chronic kidney disease

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an extremely high risk of death from cardiovascular cause. The prognosis of patients with chronic kidney disease who also have coronary artery disease is worse than certain cancer. While great strides have been made to create awareness about breast cancer, there is paucity of knowledge about the cardiovascular risk of CKD patients among both physicians and patients. Moreover, ...more »

Submitted by (@sripal.bangalore)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Long-term pulmonary function in survivors of critical illness

Pulmonary function is known to suffer during the early recovery phases from critical illness, but the long-term patterns of recovery and associated consequences are uncertain. In addition, the clinical and molecular determinants of progressive deterioration or recovery of pulmonary function remain unknown.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

New Targets for the Treatment of Heart Failure

Heart failure (HF) is one of the major health challenges in the 21st Century. Its prevalence is due a growing number of patients who survive heart attacks, who later develop heart failure; and the high incidence of diabetes leading to diabetic cardiomyopathy. Current treatments for HF only slow the progression of the disease; no treatment stops or reverses this adverse sequence. These limitations provoke the question ...more »

Submitted by (@wchilian)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Diaphragmatic dysfunction in critical illness

Diaphragmatic dysfunction occurs more frequently than clinically recognized in the setting of acute critical illness or injury. This contributes to both incipient and prolonged respiratory failure, as well as the growth of long-term acute care/rehab hospitalizations. We need a better understanding of the mechanisms of dysfunction as well as strategies to mitigate loss of diaphragmatic muscle mass, ultimately leading ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

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