Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Crowdsource NIH Funding

Congress doesn't seem to "get it" regarding the return on investment for biomedical research, but maybe the public does. Create a mechanism whereby individuals can donate directly to the NIH to support research in specific areas (or provide general support).

Submitted by (@jhagood)

Voting

21 net votes
29 up votes
8 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

New funding mechanism for major diseases

According to the National Bioeconomy Blueprint" published in 2012 by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, “Flexibility in the use of new and existing funding mechanisms in and across agencies will be vital to stimulating the discovery of new bioinventions with potential to grow the bioeconomy” (p. 24). It is known that the most effective research program in American history was the Manhattan Project. ...more »

Submitted by (@soldatovn.humgenex)

Voting

14 net votes
26 up votes
12 down votes
Active

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Sustainable funding

Our biggest challenge is sustaining domestic interest in research and science. The uncertainty of government funding and the long investment required for research are not compatible. Everything hinges on a reasonable chance at having a future in a chose career. I suggest a minimum of 20% funding level to ensure fairness and diminish politics.

Submitted by (@dfulton)

Voting

10 net votes
11 up votes
1 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

RO1 funding rate

I would like to suggest the following changes in RO1 funding: (1) Reduce the amount but maintain the duration of each RO1 award to make academic research labs SMALLER but BETTER - This will force PIs pay closer attention to experimental design, to improve the efficiency and accuracy. It may entice more PIs to do more experiments themselves, the best way to reduce errors, maintain consistency and keep in touch with the ...more »

Submitted by (@gtseng)

Voting

-8 net votes
23 up votes
31 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Funding for Hemostasis & Thrombosis Research

Thrombotic disorders, a result of the inappropriate activation of the hemostatic system, remain major causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Cancer, cardiovascular disease, trauma, and many of the other causes of death in the U.S. frequently culminate in a fatal thrombotic event. Notably, thromboembolic disease affects 500,000 people annually and leads to 100,000 deaths in the United States alone. Current ...more »

Submitted by (@abrams)

Voting

128 net votes
136 up votes
8 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Funding Limitations Block Intervention Research

The cap on R01 research grants at $500,000 per year has not changed in over 20 years. In the current fiscal crisis for research it has become an immovable block to submitting intervention studies (randomized clinical trials on treatment). Routine advice from NIH staff is to not even try for a larger study. The cap applies to every year, so one can design a trial that costs less than $2.5 million but exceeds $500,000 in ...more »

Submitted by (@stephen.fortmann)

Voting

3 net votes
6 up votes
3 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Distribution of funding

As long as funding remains at grossly inadequate levels, to distribute the research money more fairly, limit the total dollar amount any PI can receive. It should be a reasonably large number in order to fund multiple good ideas that are peer-evaluated, but small enough to allow more PIs to get funding.

Submitted by (@edward.fisher)

Voting

46 net votes
54 up votes
8 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Research Priorities

There appears to be a move towards prioritizing funding opportunities towards the RO1 funding mechanism. A quote from someone else might describe this as "more funding for saving mice". To continue to make an impact on human health, it will be crucial to maintain mechanisms and sufficient levels of funding to answer questions directly relevant to saving lives and improving health of people which are not possible to accomplish ...more »

Submitted by (@susannemay)

Voting

1 net vote
19 up votes
18 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Maintaining R01 Funding

Independent R01 are the lifeblood for biomedical research in this country. Reducing funding through this mechanism threatens the long term security of the research community and will cause young talented scientists to choose other careers. When funding is limited NIH should employ any measures available to maintain R01 a reasonable level of funding. This could be done by reducing indirect costs, large institutional awards ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.morley)

Voting

89 net votes
108 up votes
19 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Lack of Collaboration Across NIH Institutes

There are many significant questions in CVD prevention that cross the disciplines represented by the different institutes. For example, the obesity epidemic, poor nutrition, and physical inactivity are relevant to CVD, neurological disease, diabetes, and cancer. Tobacco use is directly relevant to cancer and CVD. Social determinants and disparities affect multiple diseases and outcomes. Reducing obesity will require interventions ...more »

Submitted by (@stephen.fortmann)

Voting

6 net votes
7 up votes
1 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Reproducibility Initiatives in Heart, Lung and Blood Research

Scientists feel tremendous pressure to publish numerous scientific papers in order to receive NIH funding and tenure at academic institutions. Cognitive biases of scientists and publication biases of journals that publish this barrage of papers will likely result in the publication of findings that are probably not reproducible (see "Why Most Published Research Findings Are False" by John P. A. Ioannidis in PLOS Medicine ...more »

Submitted by (@jalees)

Voting

2 net votes
5 up votes
3 down votes
Active