Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Embedding the future of regenerative medicine into the open epigenomic landscape of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells

Large-scale profiling of developmental regulators and histone modifications by genome-wide approaches have provided powerful genome-wide, high-throughput, and high resolution techniques that lead to great advances in our understanding of the global phenomena of human developmental processes. However, without a practical strategy to convert pluripotent cells direct into a specific lineage, previous studies are limited ...more »

Submitted by (@xuejunparsons)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Regenerative Medicine 2.0 in Heart and Lung Research - Back to the Drawing Board

Stem cell therapies have been quite successful in hematologic disease but the outcomes of clinical studies using stem cells for cardiopulmonary disease have been rather modest. Explanations for this discrepancy such as the fact that our blood has a high rate of physiologic, endogenous turnover and regeneration whereas these processes occur at far lower rates in the heart and lung. Furthermore, hematopoietic stem cells ...more »

Submitted by (@jalees)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Exploring Future Cardiovascular Medicine: Heart Precursors Directed from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Myocardium Regeneration

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem and the leading cause of death in the Western world. Currently, there is no treatment option or compound drug of molecular entity that can change the prognosis of CVD.

Submitted by (@xuejunparsons)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Detection of rupture prone small aortic aneurysms

Critical challenges in the assessment of aortic aneurysms are: (1) Availability of reliable animal models that simulate the human pathology, (2) Availability of molecular imaging resources – identification of biomarkers, development of targeted imaging probes and pre-clinical imaging methods, and plasma markers that predict whether an aneurysm is prone to rupture or dissection, (3) Bringing together a wide array of multi-disciplinary ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Current State of Regenerative Medicine: Moving Stem Cell Research from Animals into Humans for Clinical Trials

Realizing the developmental and therapeutic potential of pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives has been hindered by the inefficiency and instability of generating clinically-relevant functional cells from pluripotent cells through conventional uncontrollable and incomplete multi-lineage differentiation.

Submitted by (@xuejunparsons)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Targeting Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction to Prevent Heart Failure

Heart failure (HF) affects over 5 million American adults, and projected estimates show growth of this epidemic by 25% over the next 15 years as the population of the United States continues to age. Heart failure with preserved EF (HFpEF) encompasses 50% of all heart failure cases. Preclinical diastolic dysfunction (PDD) is defined as normal systolic function, moderate or severe diastolic dysfunction determined by Doppler ...more »

Submitted by (@chen.horng)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Funding for Cardiothoracic Surgery Research

The continued development of new technologies requires cardiothoracic surgeons to maintain a strong level of research to ensure the highest quality of patient care and surgical outcomes are received across the world. The level of support for CT surgery within the NIH has continued to drop over the last decade. This is a substantial problem for the specialty as the limited funding available creates difficulty in the continued ...more »

Submitted by (@meaton)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What do we know about Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF)

Mortality is similar between HFpEF and HFrEF but we have currently no viable therapeutic option for HFpEF. There have been many large trials, but they all failed. Our basic understanding of the disease is very limited which contributed to failures of many prior trials and wasting $$$. We know very little about the pathophysiology of the disease . It is time to get back to the basic science and use our new tools (e.g. ...more »

Submitted by (@rezanezafat)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Adult Cardiomyocytes in Culture

So much basic cardiovascular discovery relies on cell culture models. While cardiac cell lines exist (e.g. HL-1, H9c2), these often poorly model aspects of cardiomyocyte function in-situ (e.g. contractile function, metabolism). In contrast, primary cardiomyocytes isolated from adult animals (especially mice!) are not readily amenable to culture conditions. Even if cells can be kept alive, they are often refractory to ...more »

Submitted by (@paulbrookes)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Heart transplant surveillance

It is essential to develop clinically viable, non-invasive, less expensive technologies for the surveillance of allograft rejection in heart transplant patients. Critical challenges that exist in the near term or long term surveillance after transplant is the unavailability of molecular and cellular level markers that can be non-invasively imaged and quantified detect rejection and thus improve patient survival. Development ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Understanding the Genetic & Epigenetic Basis of Congenital Heart Disease?

Over the last thirty years, our fundamental understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of congenital heart disease has lagged the tremendous advances in the surgical and clinical care of infants with this group of disorders. We need to close this gap with investigation into the genetic basis of congenital heart malformations to develop new models of disease. The goall is translate an improved molecular genetic and ...more »

Submitted by (@jamesr.priestmd)

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