Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Congential heart defects in diabetic pregnancies: a devastating reality

There is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms underlying diabetes-induced congenital heart defects (CHDs) through basic science research and biomarker identification in human maternal circulation. Majority of the current research in CHDs is related to genetic analyses; however, environmental factors contribute to the majority of human CHDs, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. There is 60 million worldwide ...more »

Submitted by (@pyang0)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Heart Failure Therapies

We need much more support for critical basic research to understand and develop transformative therapies for this enormous health care burden. This is not simply a question of epidemiology and large multicenter population data bases. We really need hard core science. It is impossible to know where the next breakthrough will come, and setting aside funds for hot button things - stem cells, or iPS, or gene editing per ...more »

Submitted by (@dkass0)

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12 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Targeting Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction to Prevent Heart Failure

Heart failure (HF) affects over 5 million American adults, and projected estimates show growth of this epidemic by 25% over the next 15 years as the population of the United States continues to age. Heart failure with preserved EF (HFpEF) encompasses 50% of all heart failure cases. Preclinical diastolic dysfunction (PDD) is defined as normal systolic function, moderate or severe diastolic dysfunction determined by Doppler ...more »

Submitted by (@chen.horng)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Investigating Co-Morbidities in Women's Cardiovascular Health

There are important questions related to the cardiovascular health of women, and particularly to diagnostic and therapeutic challenges arising from the common existence of co-morbid conditions. The latter consideration, as well as the limitations of the budgets of individual institutes and centers at the NIH, suggest that it may be reasonable for the NHLBI to consider cross-NIH collaborations with I/Cs that have related ...more »

Submitted by (@rosemarie.robertson)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

What are the most effective strategies for reducing alarm fatigue and optimizing cardiorespiratory monitor alarm management?

Hospital cardiorespiratory monitors have great potential to save lives, but are hampered by high false alarm rates that contribute to alarm fatigue. While the long term solution is developing new medical devices that will do this better, few hospitals will benefit from new device innovations in the next decade. In order to better identify early signs of cardiorespiratory deterioration in the hospital at an early stage ...more »

Submitted by (@chrisbonafide)

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10 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Technologies for Ex-Vivo Cardiac Repair

What is needed to develop the technologies that will allow reparative interventions to be performed on excised natural hearts that have been overhauled ex vivo and replanted?

 

This will involve keeping the myocardium alive and sterile for extended periods that are long enough to complete the interventions while being able to also perform the necessary reparative interventions.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Detection of rupture prone small aortic aneurysms

Critical challenges in the assessment of aortic aneurysms are: (1) Availability of reliable animal models that simulate the human pathology, (2) Availability of molecular imaging resources – identification of biomarkers, development of targeted imaging probes and pre-clinical imaging methods, and plasma markers that predict whether an aneurysm is prone to rupture or dissection, (3) Bringing together a wide array of multi-disciplinary ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Nicotine abuse and fetal programming of heart ischemic disease

It is well-known that cigarette smoking is a major risk factor of heart ischemic disease. However, little information is known about the maternal smoking and fetal programming of heart ischemic disease in adulthood. Recently, e-cigarette (nicotine use) during pregnancy is a worldwide health concern. Epidemiologic studies have indicated that cigarette smoking during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular ...more »

Submitted by (@dxiao0)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Role of the lymphatic system in heart, lung, blood, sleep health and diseases

What is the role of lymphatic system in normal function of the heart? Do dysfunctional lymphatics contribute to heart failure? Do lymphatics have a role in recovery after MI? It has been reported that lymphatic vasculature transport HDL during reverse cholesterol transfer. Do lymphatics have a role in atherosclerosis? What is the contribution of lymphatic system to asthma or COPD? Does the lymphatic system contribute ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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77 up votes
27 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

What is the optimal way to improve cardiac arrest resuscitation?

Sudden Death from cardiac arrest and gaps in knowledge of emergency cardiovascular care are the #1 killer of more than 400,000 Americans each year. This epidemic of death and disability is largely ignored and underfunded by NIH and all funding agencies and kills more than HIV, Cancer, Diabetes, and infectious diseases. There is no national registry of cardiac arrest, no mandatory reporting, and poor funding for both fundamental, ...more »

Submitted by (@nadkarni)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Regenerative Medicine 2.0 in Heart and Lung Research - Back to the Drawing Board

Stem cell therapies have been quite successful in hematologic disease but the outcomes of clinical studies using stem cells for cardiopulmonary disease have been rather modest. Explanations for this discrepancy such as the fact that our blood has a high rate of physiologic, endogenous turnover and regeneration whereas these processes occur at far lower rates in the heart and lung. Furthermore, hematopoietic stem cells ...more »

Submitted by (@jalees)

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