Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Integrating palliative care into the care of patients with heart, lung, and blood disease

How can we best integrate primary and specialty palliative care into the care of patients with serious heart, lung, and blood diseases?

Submitted by (@jrc000)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

There is increasing awareness of the importance of palliative care in the care of patients with serious illness. Palliative care focuses on improving quality of life and reducing the stress of a serious illness for patients and their families and can be provided together with curative or life-prolonging treatments. It includes both primary palliative care (delivered by all cliniicans who care for patients with serious illness) and specialty palliative care (delivered by physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains and others with special training in palliative care.) Patients with serious heart, lung, and blood diseases have profound unmet palliative care needs and it is not clear how these needs can best be met.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Studies show dramatic benefit of integrating palliative care into the care of patients with cancer, but there is little data on the best way to improve palliative care for patients with serious heart, lung, and blood disease. The opportunity exists to support research that develops and evaluates interventions to improve primary and specialty palliative care for patients with heart, lung, and blood diseases.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

National network to study the pathobiology of sepsis

Sepsis is the leading cause of death in hospitalized patients, the 3rd leading cause of death in all people in the US, the most common condition leading to widespread vascular collapse, among the most common causes of respiratory failure, and a frequent cause of acute cardiac dysfunction.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Developing a national network to address important aspects of sepsis (causes and consequences of cardiac dysfunction, molecular determinants of respiratory failure) and serve as a trials group for testing novel interventions for new discoveries.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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2 net votes
4 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Novel methods to diagnose and treat microvascular ischemia

Microvascular ischemia is common, particularly in the setting of critical illness. We need better ways to evaluate, diagnose and treat these conditions, whether they relate to microvascular myocardial ischemia, as a primary diagnosis of complication of other acute illness, or non-myocardial ischemia during the course of surgery, injury, infection or acute illness.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Development of effective diagnostics would lead to improved treatments for myocardial and non-myocardial microvascular ischemia, and also advance understanding to extend the advance beyond this setting.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Effect of obesity on recovery of lung function in pediatric survivors of critical illness

What are the determinants of persistent respiratory failure in children? Are obese children at greater risk for prolonged mechanical ventilation than non-obese children? Does BMI affect the time to recovery of lung function in obese children with ARDS? What is the pathogenesis and molecular contributors of obesity on respiratory failure in critical illness?

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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3 up votes
2 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Paralysis must be better known to doctors, therapists, and the public

Sleep Paralysis (SP) is a very common (up to 40% of all people), yet little-known condition that is terrifying, and potentially traumatizing, especially to people who are unaware of this condition. It is critical that SP is better known by all doctors, therapists, and the public. Too many people are mistreated and misdiagnosed as psychotic or even demon possessed when they do not understand SP, or they hide the experience ...more »

Submitted by (@kendraz)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Worldwide, all cultures have created elaborate spiritual explanations for SP, many of which unnecessarily foster fear and superstition. Both fear and superstition could be greatly reduced by an objective understanding of SP and its remedies.

 

Examples of sleep paralysis being little known: In the current Coursera course, Sleep: Neurobiology, Medicine, and Society at the University of Michigan, which has many medical doctors and Phds as students, all the rare forms of sleep disorders were listed and discussed, except common Sleep Paralysis, which was never even mentioned.

 

When I personally experienced chronic SP 13 years ago, none of my doctors had heard of it. I had to do my own research to discover what it was and how to reduce it. In the meantime, when I shared the experiences of seeing fearful presences in my bedroom with my best friend, she became convinced I was possessed by an evil spirit and urged me to undergo a shamanic depossession ritual. Even after I explained to her that SP was common, she completely cut off all relationship with me out of her fear.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

making Sleep Paralysis better known as a first step should be easily accomplished by requiring education on this topic for all medical personnel. In addition, a campaign to inform the public is needed.

 

Reducing stress and disturbed sleep are the baseline for reducing SP. These simple remedies should be easily communicated to the public.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : kendra zoa

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10 net votes
15 up votes
5 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Durable gene activity map at the individual level

A durable gene activity map of the individual to understand when certain gene sets are on vs off or dysfunctional over an individual’s lifetime as one way of guiding the precision of medicine for that patient. It would need to be person portable and universally exportable and interpretable across all of the EHRs.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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3 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Predict the needs for inter and intra-hospital transfer for acute care surgery patients with respiratory failure

Density mapping of the need and flow of patients requiring acute care surgery vis-a-vis inter-facility transfer, care hand-off failures, post-acute care resource mismatch to articulate a funding plan resource allocation and development akin to what has been done for trauma care.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Develop common-sense standards for obesity research

Obesity research is riddled with methodological problems that are rarely challenged, leading to the perpetuation of misinformation and interventions that do harm. Given the two-thirds of the population who are classified as higher weight and thus subject to these interventions, it is past time to clean up the basic scientific flaws in this research area. For a quick summary of a couple of these issues, see Poodle Science: ...more »

Submitted by (@dbdb00)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This subject really is both CG and CC. The CQ aspect is to see past the weight bias and stigma we are all subject to in order to see diversity of weight as normal, even as people across the weight spectrum suffer health insults from sources that are rarely investigated within the medical model (cf social determinants of health). The CC aspect is the enormous economic and cultural pressures to maintain the valuing of some bodies over others in order to sell products and create a group of people who have fewer ways to defend themselves from oppression.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Several key areas could make a big difference and they are quite feasible.

1. Require researchers to have studied weight bias and stigma so they are more aware of their own potential proclivities to frame research questions or results according to the status quo.

2. Require any study that claims a weight loss finding to have, report, and publish followup data on all participants at least 2-5 years post-intervention.

3. Require any study claiming a health issue related to weight to compare not higher and lower weight people, but rather higher weight people who have pursued weight loss and higher weight people who have not, since there is no way for higher weight people to be always-been-thinner.

4. Require weight/health research to control for obvious confounders such as weight cycling, SES, exposure to weight stigma, exposure to weight discrimination, exposure to racism, exposure to stress, lack of access to unbiased medical care, etc.

5. Require that journals allowing statements in the abstract or discussion or conclusions that generalize beyond the data be accountable, and that journals provide an accurate translation of the findings for journalists complete with statements about limitations of findings and possible alternative interpretations.

6. Fund projects which are about listening, especially to people who are rarely asked about their lived experience, in order to generate better research that actually improves quality of life for higher-weight people.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Deb Burgard, PhD

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44 up votes
20 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Optimal hemoglobin threshold for transfusion in children with ARDS?

Do different hemoglobin transfusion thresholds alter outcomes in children with ARDS? What is the optimal *minimum* transfusion threshold for children with ARDS? What patient-centered outcomes can be affected by transfusion strategies: ventilator free days, time to organ function recovery, duration of intensive care stay, survival?

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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8 net votes
9 up votes
1 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pathogenesis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in survivors of critical illness.

Acute cardiovascular complications are frequent in critical illness and injury, occurring on a spectrum that includes troponin leak or demand ischemia to acute occlusive coronary events and lethal arrhythmias. They arise in the course of similar acute illnesses but they epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment and long-term consequences are unknown. Are they the result of a generalized inflammatory state that persists ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Complications of critical illness are frequent and the most common are cardiovascular in nature but not well understood. Understanding the pathogenesis of these consequences will lead to improve treatments, acute survival of critical illness and injury, and improved long-term outcomes.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Patients receiving critical care services in the United States are among the most close monitored, including continuous monitoring of cardiorespiratory physiology. Integrating high dimensional data from ICU data streams and applying big data analytics, in combination with primetime genomic and metabolomic technologies, makes this question imminently feasible.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Develop and validate a metric to address the full spectrum of patient-level comorbidities affecting critical illness

An individual metric to inform about the additive and not individual impact of comorbidities on critical illness and peri-operative mortality. For instance, we know the impact of COPD or MI or CKD on mortality after hemicolectomy, but not necessarily the additive impact of all three.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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4 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Diaphragmatic dysfunction in critical illness

Diaphragmatic dysfunction occurs more frequently than clinically recognized in the setting of acute critical illness or injury. This contributes to both incipient and prolonged respiratory failure, as well as the growth of long-term acute care/rehab hospitalizations. We need a better understanding of the mechanisms of dysfunction as well as strategies to mitigate loss of diaphragmatic muscle mass, ultimately leading ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This problem can be addressed through a combination of Integrative physiology and real-time data analytics.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Patients receiving critical care services in the United States are among the most close monitored, including continuous monitoring of cardiorespiratory physiology. Integrating high dimensional data from ICU data streams and applying big data analytics, in combination with primetime genomic and metabolomic technologies, makes answering this question imminently feasible.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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