Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Heart transplant surveillance

It is essential to develop clinically viable, non-invasive, less expensive technologies for the surveillance of allograft rejection in heart transplant patients. Critical challenges that exist in the near term or long term surveillance after transplant is the unavailability of molecular and cellular level markers that can be non-invasively imaged and quantified detect rejection and thus improve patient survival. Development ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Can one integrate cardiac imaging studies with genetic,clinical, "omics", and historical data to predict disease and personalize

There are many novel imaging modalities, including radiographic, scintigraphic, sonographic, MR-based, and molecular for the heart and vessels. Patients have unique medical "signatures"- genetic risk factor profiles, epigenetic markings, "omics" profiles, and personal clinical and family history as well as symptom constellation and physical exam findings. Can these all be integrated into a single personalized profile ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Detection of rupture prone small aortic aneurysms

Critical challenges in the assessment of aortic aneurysms are: (1) Availability of reliable animal models that simulate the human pathology, (2) Availability of molecular imaging resources – identification of biomarkers, development of targeted imaging probes and pre-clinical imaging methods, and plasma markers that predict whether an aneurysm is prone to rupture or dissection, (3) Bringing together a wide array of multi-disciplinary ...more »

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

NHLBI Cardiovascular Engineering Strategy

Most impressive and impactful advances in CV diagnostics and therapies came in the last 50 years from CV engineering, including implantable devices and imaging technology. CV engineers are developing next breakthrough technology including tissue engineering and flexible electronics. However, organizational structure of NIH does not have an entity responsible for strategic development of CV engineering. NIBIB does not ...more »

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