Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improve vascular healing and extend long term benefit of interventions

How can we develop new approaches to improve vascular healing and extend the long term benefits of vascular interventions for more patients?

Submitted by (@societyforvascularsurgery)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

­The response to vascular injury, whether it be catheter interventions, bypass surgery, or chronic implants, is a reactive process characterized by inflammation, cell proliferation, and fibrosis leading to failure. Better understanding of the mechanisms of vessel remodeling, and restoring homeostasis, is needed to improve prediction, develop and translate new treatments. This remains the leading scientific problem in vascular medicine and surgery. New approaches such as proteomics, lipidomics, molecular imaging offer new opportunities in this realm.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society for Vascular Surgery

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Psychological Stress and Cardiovascular Health

Our new Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy said recently that one of this four rules for health was "...making sure I’m focusing on my emotional and mental well-being." A majority of Americans reporting moderate to high levels of stress (American Psychological Association, 2014), and evidence links psychosocial aspects of stress and cardiovascular health. Therefore, just as Dr. Murthy highlights well-being as a foundation ...more »

Submitted by (@tomiyama)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : A. Janet Tomiyama, Ph.D.

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Prevention of Obesity

What are the behavioral factors that predispose to excessive weight gain and development of obesity? And, which intervention strategies can effectively prevent excessive weight gain and obesity? NHLBI, other NIH institutes and the society at-large have invested heavily in research and clinical practice aimed at treatment of obesity (i.e, weight loss in those who are already overweight). However, much less research ...more »

Submitted by (@rpate0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Reducing the prevalence of obesity is one of the great public health challenges of the 21st century. Research should be focused, first and foremost, on prevention, not treatment, of this problem. It seems highly likely that improving the behaviors that can prevent obesity would produce a wide range of important public health benefits.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Two generations ago the prevalence of obesity was much lower than it is today. The prevalence was lower then, not because overweight people were better at losing weight; rather rates were lower because far fewer people became overweight in the first place. It is high time that the scientific community, clinicians, and public health practitioners invested their efforts in prevention first, where there is every reason to believe we could be successful. These efforts should be informed by a robust body of knowledge, and it is recommended that NHLBI lead the effort to expand the body of knowledge on primary prevention of obesity.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Russell Pate

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2 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Culturally competent T4 research interventions to reduce heart, lung, blood, sleep

Using previous federal and partner infrastructure, what are the best methods to promote culturally competent T4 interventions that will reduce cardiopulmonary risk factors in global populations with a disproportionate burden of heart, lung, blood, sleep diseases?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Reduction of cardiopulmonary risk factors

Reduction of health inequities

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Proven, evidence-based interventions exist for common diseases that can be adapted to reduce burden in low resource settings.

However,determining the best way to adapt existing interventions that are culturally competent and effective is a sensitive issue.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Implementation of T4 Translation Research Platforms and Networks

How can cost-effective implementation of late stage translation (T4) research protocols be facilitated for heart, lung, blood, sleep diseases and health inequities?

Can research platforms and networks be created and utilized to facilitate execution of multi-level interventions and approaches for the end user in collaboration with key stake holders?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Answering this question would lead to timely implementation and dissemination of new knowledge that will be available to address the current heart, lung, blood, sleep health burden.

One of NHLBI’s current strategic plan’s goals is to translate research knowledge for use in populations so that it has significant positive health impacts and provides a return on investment from discovery and early translation research. Currently, only a fraction of new knowledge yielded from proven effective early stage translation research is being used in the real world – resulting in an avoidable disease burden. Late stage translation (T4) research studies the implementation of proven-effective interventions at a multi-level to include populations, communities, healthcare systems, providers, families and patients. Conducting T4 research requires development of comprehensive research teams across communities, public health and health care delivery systems, families, and patients along with unique translation T4 research methods and metrics. Because resource intensive infrastructure is needed to conduct high quality T4 research and this infrastructure is not widely or readily available, a platforms and network for conducting protocols will prove efficient and provide high quality standard outputs.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The NHLBI Health Inequities Think Tank highly recommended that creating T4 translation research platforms and networks would meet the needs of the scientific community enabling them to respond to the heart, lung, blood, sleep health burden.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Arrhythmia Therapies Based on Understanding Mechanisms

There is a need to translate these new insights of genetic, molecular, cellular, and tissue arrhythmia mechanisms into the development of novel, safe, and new therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of cardiac arrhythmias.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Reduced socioeconomic burden of cardiac arrhythmias. Development of new technologies and recognition of new arrhythmia mechanisms.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Several studies have already recognized the unexpected antiarrhythmic effects of some therapies intended for other cardiovascular disease. For example statins, aldosterone blockers, and possibly some essential fatty acids may reduce arrhythmia burden in patients receiving these interventions. Clinical trials should be developed to demonstrate the efficacy of these interventions, and arrhythmia endpoints, including those for atrial fibrillation and sudden cardiac death, should be incorporated into other large clinical trials. Research into novel antiarrhythmic might focus on (a) drug development; (b) cell/gene-based therapy and tissue engineering; and (c) improvements in development and use of devices and ablation to prevent or inhibit arrhythmic electrical activity. Continued research might also focus on targeting of upstream regulatory cascades of ion channel expression and function. Continued antiarrhythmic strategies might include the exploration of novel delivery systems (e.g., utilizing advances in nanotechnology and microelectronics), biological pacemakers, AV node repair/bypass, and treatment and/or reversal of disease-induced myocardial remodeling and tachyarrhythmias. Evaluation of new therapies should include a cost analysis. Studies in both children and adults with congenital heart are needed. New interventions might include new pharmacologic approaches as well as advances in electrophysiologic imaging and improved approaches to ablation.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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86 up votes
35 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

DESIGN AND EVALUATE INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE SLEEP HEALTH AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Data indicate the association between short sleep and circadian disruption on a number of adverse outcomes such as cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, hypertension, etc. There is a need to move beyond association to interventions that can be shown to improve sleep duration and circadian disruption.

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

As described, we need to move beyond association to intervention. We have developing mobile technologies to assess outcomes in subjects living in their normal circumstances. The issue is what interventions can be applied and be shown to work to address both sleep length and circadian timing of sleep. There is a need to stimulate research to assess different potential interventions to see which are the most effective.

 

The impact of this will be invaluable. We should be able to improve sleep and circadian health in the US population and thereby modifying this risk factor for development of chronic diseases.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

We have the relevant tools to do this. There are millions of Americans with short sleep and millions of Americans who have misplaced sleep in relation to their normal circadian rhythms. Thus, there is no shortage of subjects to recruit for this type of research. There is now a developing body of knowledge about techniques that can be applied to modifying behavior in other areas—weight loss, stopping smoking, etc. These techniques could be the basis of new interventions to improve sleep health.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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205 net votes
250 up votes
45 down votes
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