Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Research on in vitro and in vivo Biomarker Predictors of Clinical Response in Lung Disease

How can research on in vitro and in vivo biomarker predictors of clinical response in lung disease be encouraged?

Submitted by (@skrenrich)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

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Strategic Goal: Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Research Opportunities in HLB to Facilitate Aging in Place

There is a need for greater evidence-based research over the next 5-10 years to reduce healthcare costs, reduce hospitalizations, and support older persons with significant heart, lung, blood, sleep conditions to remain in their private homes if feasible, if technology is utilized that fosters clinical and epidemiologic research.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

No other force will have as big of an impact on our health system as the unalterable rate of our aging population and subsequent increased rate of heart, lung and blood diseases. The impact of doing nothing is unforeseeable.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Evidence-based research over the next 5-10 years to reduce healthcare costs, reduce hospitalizations, and support older persons with significant heart, lung and blood conditions remain in their private homes is feasible if technology is utilized that fosters clinical and epidemiologic research.

Many cardiovascular risk factors increase as the population ages including uncontrolled systolic hypertension and atherosclerosis both contributing to the well-being of our society and increasingly high health care costs (Izzo, Levy, & Black, 2012). No other force will have as big of an impact on our health system as the unalterable rate of our aging population and subsequent increased rate of heart, lung and blood diseases. The impact of doing nothing is unforeseeable.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulmonary Vascular Diseases

Does anticoagulation with warfarin improve outcomes (time to clinical worsening, qualtiy of life, exercise capacity) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension treated with current oral/inhaled therapies? There are substantial "unknowns" and practice variation in anticoagulation in PAH. Resource utilization is also a factor here. We may either be helping patients (or hurting them with side effects) by using anticoagulation. ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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This is a view of problems in the field.

Pulmonary Hypertension Clinical Research: Current Problems and Possibilities

Current studies limited to the short term, with soft outcomes.

No mechanistic studies embedded in trials.

Control of phenotype is weak.

Small n: lumping of cohorts.

No factorial of advanced design.

No biological samples obtained for study.

Failure to study basic management issues.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Lung exacerbations and disease progression

What is the relationship between exacerbations and progression of chronic lung diseases?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Genomic signature in animal models

What is the genomic signature in a relevant animal model with translational significance for human pulmonary disease?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Lung Transplantation

Although the majority of lung recipients experience significant health improvement, they also frequently face serious symptom distress, impaired physical functioning and poor quality of life due to post-transplant morbidity, such as chronic rejection, infection and multiple side-effects of immunosuppression. a) Conduct clinical trials of interventions designed to maximize clinicians' support of patients' self-management ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

a) Conduct clinical trials of interventions designed to maximize clinicians' support of patients' self-management behaviors so that patients and clinicians working together can achieve optimal control of disease, reduce symptom distress and complications, and promote quality of life.

 

b) Evaluate the impact of integrating palliative care and transplant care for symptom management, goal setting and advanced care planning along the entire lung transplant illness trajectory (pre, post and end of life).

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Prenatal effects on pulmonary disease

What are the prenatal determinants of adult pulmonary disease?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The role of Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) in the prevention and treatment of rejection of heart and lung transplants

According to the ISHLT, more than 4,000 patients undergo a heart transplant each year, and almost 4,000 receive single or double lung transplants. Their prognosis depends heavily on the avoidance of rejection, which claims the majority of their lives. For heart transplant recipients, the median survival is 11 years, while for lung transplant recipients, it is approximately 5 years. The current most common anti-rejection ...more »

Submitted by (@mmarques)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Patients who are fortunate to receive a matched heart or one or two lungs transplants are at high risk of dying from rejection early and even years after the operation. Thus, they are given cocktails of highly toxic anti-rejection drugs for the rest of their lives. Unfortunately, despite compliance with their drug regimens, many patients still suffer repeated episodes of rejection that may be fatal. In addition, they develop serious side-effects such as diabetes, infections, malignancies, renal failure, etc. ECP has been shown efficacy in preventing and treating cardiac transplant rejection, but the data are limited. ECP appears to benefit such patients by causing an increase in the number of circulating T regulatory (“T regs”) cells. T regs are known to mediate immune tolerance, the ultimate goal of a long-term successful transplant. The role of ECP in lung transplantation is mostly unknown. Very preliminary data have been gathered from retrospective studies. We suspect that patients with early bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (“BOS”) will benefit from ECP prior to developing irreversible pulmonary damage. In both types of transplants, however, it is unknown when should ECP be started, how often it should be employed (treatment schedule), and for how long. Finally, the most compelling argument to use ECP in heart and lung transplantation is its excellent side-effect profile. Furthermore, ECP may allow a decrease in the number of drugs needed to prevent rejection.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Many patients with heart and lung transplants develop severe and often fatal rejection despite the current drug options to prevent rejection. ECP could be added to their treatment regimens and decrease side-effects, improving long-term survival.

 

ECP is generally well tolerated and complications are extremely infrequent.

 

There is a great potential for multi-disciplinary collaboration between Apheresis Medicine, Cardiology, and Pulmonary specialists.

 

It is conceivable that manufacturers of ECP instruments will be interested in contributing to the design and support of these studies.

 

Such studies could shed light in the mechanism of action of ECP in heart and lung transplantation.

 

There is a need to develop standardized treatment regimens based on well designed clinical trials to further optimize the use of ECP. Development and standardization of measurable outcomes is critical for the success of clinical studies in apheresis in general, and ECP in particular.

 

Challenges:

1. Limited number of institutions providing ECP treatment.

2. Cost of ECP procedures.

3. Small number of animal models available for apheresis research. Thus, limited studies of ECP mechanism(s) of action. However, understanding pathological mechanisms and their relationship to response to apheresis is critical for optimization and advancement of patient care in heart and lung transplantation.

4. Lack of infra-structure for apheresis research.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Marisa Marques on behalf of ASFA

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Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Genetic, epigenetic, and environmental influences on lung development.

Understanding the genetic, epigenetic, and environmental influences on lung development.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

While we are fully supportive of the recent emphasis on patient‐centered outcomes and implementation science, we are also reminded of the critical importance of investigating underlying mechanisms of pulmonary, critical care and sleep disorders. Recent discoveries have created exciting progress in the areas of cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary fibrosis, and biological therapies in asthma. Only through further efforts to elucidate underlying mechanisms are new therapeutic approaches likely to emerge. Promoting further academic‐industry interactions are likely to yield benefits, which will ultimately lead to improvements in the health of our nation.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Research Advocacy Committee, American Thoracic Society

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Low-dose and non-ionizing imaging for chronic lung disease

Critical Challenge

Submitted by (@str0001)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Imaging plays a crucial role in the initial evaluation of patients with suspected or surveillance of those with confirmed diffuse chronic lung disease. Attention towards developing alternative non-ionizing imaging technologies and evaluating the efficacy of radiation dose saving techniques will impact a large patient population.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT) plays a major role in the evaluation of diffuse pulmonary disease. High resolution CT (HRCT) characterizes parenchymal patterns of lung disease, identifies areas amenable to biopsy, and aids in decisions pertaining to workup and therapy of lung disease. With multidetector CT technology, volumetric HRCT enables evaluation of the entire lung volume for diffuse lung disease. The utility of CT needs to be balanced with the exposure of patients to ionizing radiation, particularly younger-aged individuals who are more sensitive to ionizing radiation. In CT, dose-saving techniques enable imaging of the parenchyma at ultra-low dose levels. Additionally, an understanding of low radiation-dose CT techniques that preserve the diagnostic ability for diffuse lung disease, while maintaining the precision of quantitative measures, is needed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) is underutilized as an imaging tool given respiratory motion and limitations in spatial resolution. A need exists to develop and apply MR imaging techniques with spatial resolution approaching that of high resolution CT. Promising advances in the MR technology has occurred, and continued development and application will provide alternative and non-ionizing options for imaging patients with diffuse lung disease affecting both the parenchyma and airways.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Thoracic Radiology

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Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Critical Windows in Early Development to Maximize Lung Health

Is there a critical window of growth and development for maximizing lung function?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Low lung function during childhood tracks to early adulthood and contributes to early onset disease. Lung health promotion is needed, but we know little about what can enhance and protect human health during rapid phases of lung development in utero and growth postnatally to adulthood.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Researchers could turn their attention on healthy and “maximally” health populations (human and model organisms) to understand genetic and environmental exposures that influence lung function at upper ends of the spectrum (>2 SD from the mean).

Recent findings suggest that there is an urban-rural continuum of lung function in specific ethnic groups; and interventions with maternal dietary supplements can enhance lung function in offspring. These set the stage for further study on developing knowledge of early life events that can inform lung health promotion.

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Systems Approaches to "Phenosimilar" Diseases

There are diverse diseases that share similar features. For example, many chronic airways diseases (chronic aspiration, ciliary dyskinesia, some COPD) "phenocopy" cystic fibrosis in terms of infectious agents, mucus clearance problems, progressive loss of lung function, etc. Use multiplatform "omics" approaches and Big Data bioinformatics to identify common nodes for therapeutic targeting. Other examples: emphysema and ...more »

Submitted by (@jhagood)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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may be able to target multiple diseases with new or repurposed therapies. Might narrow down the broad array of potential "high value" targets to study.

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