Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Enhancing Medical Professional Education, Training and Research

Would using multi-disciplinary teams (nutritionists, exercise physiologists, social workers, nurses, etc.) be an effective approach to applying lifestyle medicine to improve patient care?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

It would have a global impact on the health of the public, should patients CV and pulmonary health improve as a result of training and application of skills.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Previous NHLBI initiatives dovetail with the proposed and have demonstrated feasibility. NHLBI supported the Nutrition Academic Award program.

There is a movement to implement novel approaches to enhance training in and application of lifestyle medicine (e.g., smoking, nutrition and physical activity) for physicians (e.g., resident physicians and fellows) to improve patient care and cardiovascular and pulmonary health outcomes. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) recognizes the role of nutrition and physical activity and recommends that health professionals (e.g., practicing physicians, residents, fellows, physician assistants, nurse practitioners) counsel patients on lifestyle behavior changes. To capitalize on ACA, medical professionals must be trained and obtain the necessary practice skills to deliver needed services. Research to evaluate the approach must be an integral part of the process.

 

Collaborative resource needs in public-private partnerships have the potential to address this CQ. Research to evaluate this approach is equally needed.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

15 net votes
31 up votes
16 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Medical student research training in LMIC settings

What are the strategies for heart, lung, blood, sleep workforce to gain first-hand international experience in clinical research/implementation research training in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

• Among the students who earn medical degrees in the United States, very few of them have been sufficiently trained to address the health needs of the most vulnerable populations.

• An international exposure in an LMIC setting would have enormous impact on clinical practice and research

• Any medical student interested in broadening their training may have opportunities for clinical and non-clinical hands-on experience and in turn this would increase number of physicians and researchers in global health.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Feasibility: • The NHLBI has a wealth of experience in training and career development programs in general and has supported and worked with global centers of excellence in this area.

• This experience can be used to leverage international experience in clinical practice and research outcomes in LMIC settings.

 

Challenges: • NHLBI would have to develop additional training mechanism(s) to foster clinical practice and research in an LMIC area.

 

• Resources for this unique training may be a challenge.

 

• Helping patients from vulnerable populations would involve confronting cultural differences and language barriers.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

-30 net votes
5 up votes
35 down votes
Active