Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Improving heart, lung, blood, sleep Health Outcomes for Minority and Underserved Men

What are the best strategies to improve implementation of evidence-based practices (EBP) to enhance effective health risk communication strategies among racial and ethnic minority males and underserved men? Examples of several issues that need to be addressed are: • Need for better definition of the role of families/communities in EBP (as co-therapists). • Requires less system fragmentation • Need for improved measurement, ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Our improved ability to develop, implement and disseminate EBPs tailored specifically for men in health disparity populations may help us move beyond current obstacles in addressing health inequities and improve health outcomes.

Some current challenges:

• High blood pressure affects more than 40 percent of African Americans.

• The odds for stroke, the third leading cause of death in the United States, are especially high for African American men at 70%.

• African Americans are about 50% more likely to experience stroke than Caucasians.

• Sleep apnea is seen more frequent among men than among women, particularly among African-American and Hispanic men.

• Life expectancy for African American men is 4.7 years less than for white men (2010).

• Native American men have an average life expectancy of 71 years old compared to white men who have an average life expectancy of 76.5 year.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

• Shifting demographics of race as well as ageing of the population in this country will have a major impact on the utilization, organization and delivery of health care.

• Country acknowledges significant economic burden of health inequities in the U.S. in the near future.

• Hospitals and health systems are working hard to align quality improvement goals with disparities solutions. Opportunity to leverage these efforts for the development and implementation of targeted health disparities initiatives is timely.

• HL has a number of large population-based studies (such as JHS, Strong Heart, Hispanic Community Health) that could be leveraged to specifically identify EBP for wider implementation and dissemination to underserved areas.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

14 net votes
32 up votes
18 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Regenerative Medicine 2.0 in Heart and Lung Research - Back to the Drawing Board

Stem cell therapies have been quite successful in hematologic disease but the outcomes of clinical studies using stem cells for cardiopulmonary disease have been rather modest. Explanations for this discrepancy such as the fact that our blood has a high rate of physiologic, endogenous turnover and regeneration whereas these processes occur at far lower rates in the heart and lung. Furthermore, hematopoietic stem cells ...more »

Submitted by (@jalees)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Some barriers to successfully implementing cardiopulmonary regeneration include the complex heterogeneous nature of the heart and lung.

 

Hematopoietic stem cells can give rise to all hematopoietic cells but the heart and lung appear to contain numerous pools of distinct regenerative stem and progenitor cells, many of which only regenerate a limited cell type in the respective organ. The approach of injecting one stem cell type that worked so well for hematopoietic stem cells is unlikely to work in the heart and lung.

 

We therefore need new approaches which combine multiple regenerative cell types and pathways in order to successfully repair and regenerate heart and lung tissues. These cell types will likely also require specific matrix cues since there are numerous, heterogeneous microenvironments in the heart and lung.

 

If we rethink our current approaches to regenerating the heart and lung and we use combined approaches in which multiple cell types and microevironments are concomitantly regenerated (ideally by large scale collaborations between laboratories), we are much more likely to achieve success.

 

This will represent a departure from the often practiced "Hey, let us inject our favorite cell" approach that worked so well in hematologic disease but these novel, combined approaches targeting multiple endogenous and/or exogenous regenerative cells could fundamentally change our ability to treat heart and lung disease.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Jalees Rehman

Voting

7 net votes
11 up votes
4 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Consequences of drug interactions leading to QTc prolongation

Better understand the consequences of drug interactions leading to QTc prolongation. About 1/3 of cardiac ICU patients develop QT prolongation and about 45% receive drugs that are possibly contributing to this problem. The full spectrum of contributors and causes, as well as the patient-centered and health-system-centered clinical outcomes, are not known.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Reduction in adverse drug events and preventable deaths

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Combining the power of predictive analytics of high dimensional data streaming continuously from critically ill patients, combined with precision medicine genomics and metabolomics, makes this imminently feasible.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Council

Voting

-1 net votes
1 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Best Implementation Strategies

What are the best implementation strategies to improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines, protocols, and other evidence-based practices that actually lead to the elimination of inequities in preventable disability and death from heart, lung, blood, and sleep diseases?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

12 net votes
20 up votes
8 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Stem Cell Biology

There is a need to develop “designer platelets” and “designer red cells,” as well as facilitate large-scale production of these products for therapeutic and diagnostic use.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The reprogramming of adult stem cells has resulted in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can develop into any tissue of the body. These iPSCs ultimately may be used as a transplantable source of stem cells for a variety of hematologic diseases. Although this technology has enabled the generation of patient-specific or disease-specific stem cells that are also amenable to genetic manipulation, the major scientific hurdle has been the ability to create clinically meaningful functional blood products, including transplantable HSCs from differentiating iPSCs. The production of clinically functional blood products -- i.e. red blood cells derived from autologous iPSCs --could replace allogeneic products in highly immunized patients and the generation of megakaryocytes for patient-specific platelet production from iPSCs could drive significant progress in this area. Furthermore, disease-specific iPSCs could serve as targets for both drug development and drug screening in patients with rare hematologic disorders. In addition, support for scale-up and GMP processes, which are difficult to fund via the R01 mechanism will require specific grant opportunities tailored to infrastructure and process development.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

Voting

25 net votes
53 up votes
28 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The role of Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) in the prophylaxis and treatment of acute & chronic Graft Versus Host Disease

In Acute Graft Versus Host Disease (aGVHD), we would like to examine whether early and intensified delivery of ECP as part of standard prophylaxis will decrease overall corticosteroid exposure while preserving expected relapse rates in patients undergoing unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) is common after HSCT (30-50% recipients) and is a major contributor to late transplant-related ...more »

Submitted by (@js2745)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Patients who develop aGVHD undergo toxic therapy with high-dose corticosteroids, often for long durations, resulting in high morbidity and treatment related mortality. Alternatively, T cell depletion of the donor graft to reduce GVHD is associated with high rates of infection and relapse of the disease that led to the HSCT. Targeting other pathways of GVHD pathogenesis may preserve the beneficial immune reconstitution and graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects, while ameliorating the severity of GVHD. One such pathway involves regulatory T cells (T regs), which inhibit T cell alloreactivity, and are correlated with the incidence and severity of GVHD without loss of GVT. To date, there is no consensus on a standard second-line therapy for aGVHD, and current approaches focus mainly on intensification of immunosuppression. Addressing this compelling question will help to decrease overall corticosteroid exposure while preserving the expected relapse rates in patients undergoing unrelated donor HSCT.

 

Appropriate initial therapy for cGVHD involves high doses & prolonged use (yrs) of corticosteroids, while patients still develop irreversible sclerotic manifestations of disease. Early intervention prior to disease onset may help prevent cGVHD development or lessen its severity, requiring less corticosteroid exposure. Addressing the compelling question for cGVHD will help decrease exposure to drugs with associated morbidity, while preserving expected relapse rates in these patients.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Feasibility:

 

* GVHD has relatively high incidence after HSCT and at the same time there is a lack of consensus on standard second line therapy for the disease. Thus, there will be increased interest in developing and participation in those studies.

 

** ECP is generally well tolerated and complications are infrequent.

 

*** There is a great potential for multi-discipline collaboration approach in this patients’ population.

 

*** There is an opportunity to engage industry partners in the design and support for these studies.

 

**** There are numerous scientific opportunities for meritorious science as there have been limited systematic studies of ECP mechanisms of as well as standardization of apheresis protocols based on GVHD disease state.

 

 

 

Challenges:

 

* Limited number of institutions providing ECP treatment.

 

** Cost of the procedures (although Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services now covers ECP for cGVHD).

 

*** There is a very limited number of animal models available for apheresis research in general, and studies of the mechanism(s) of action of photopheresis have been very limited as well as difficult and expensive to perform. However understanding pathological mechanisms and its relationship to response to apheresis is critical for optimization and advancement of patient care.

 

****Lack of infra-structure for apheresis research.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Joseph Schwartz on behalf of ASFA

Voting

103 net votes
126 up votes
23 down votes
Active

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Predictive analytics to engage healthy behaviors and maintain health while reducing cost

Predictive Health employs the principle that using modern health testing and predictive analytics will better define true health (not just absence of disease) and, in combination with large-scale data analytics, will facilitate predicting deviations from the healthy trajectory earlier than traditional disease diagnosis, thus allowing more effective and less costly interventions to maintain health. Predictive Health educates ...more »

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

By addressing this CC the health of the nation will be improved: better national and individual understanding of health, greater longevity of sustained health and productivity, reduced costs of healthcare by focusing on health than on disease diagnosis and management.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The Emory/Georgia Tech Predictive Health Institute (http://predictivehealth.emory.edu) was founded ~10 years ago by launching educational (http://predictivehealth.emory.edu/education/index.html) and scientific (http://predictivehealth.emory.edu/chd/index.html) programs to achieve the Predictive Health goals. The scientific approach created a prospective longitudinal cohort of individuals who have been richly phenotyped according to traditional medical testing (clinical laboratory, stress testing, etc) and research testing (genomics, metabolomics, regenerative cell potential, oxidative stress) to create the deepest understanding of current and future health. The success of the Predictive Health Institute demonstrates the feasibility and potential success of such a critical challenge to both human health and healthcare expenditures.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Greg Martin, for the Emory/Georgia Tech Predictive Health Institute

Voting

5 net votes
9 up votes
4 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Use isogenic iPS cells to advance Precision Medicine

The goals of Precision Medicine can be achieved if we determine the biological basis of disease-associated variants for NHLBI diseases. Advances in genetic research have yielded hundreds of disease-associated DNA polymorphisms, yet we lack robust methods to experimentally test their functional relevance in human cells. Determining the molecular and cellular basis of human phenotypic variation is one of the great challenges ...more »

Submitted by (@bconklin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Identifying how disease mutations result in cellular phenotypes will provide an experimental basis for Precision Medicine. Advances in genome engineering and iPS cell technology now offer a unique opportunity for NHLBI researchers to make a focused effort to produce isogenic disease models, to determining the function of putative disease loci. Just a few years ago, the barriers to this type of project seemed insurmountable, as iPS cells were made with damaging DNA insertions, designer nucleases were difficult to make, complex material-transfer agreements (MTAs) inhibited the open sharing of reagents, and cell-engineering methods were cumbersome. Remarkably, all of these barriers have fallen substantially in recent years, to reveal strategic new opportunities. The phenotypes are determined in isogenic human iPS-models, these observations can be applied to animal models, and human clinical studies.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Progress towards this goal is being made, but slow pace does not meet opportunity that the NHLBI community has. The NHLBI has a much larger opportunity than other institutes because so many genetic variants have already been determined via excellent genetic studies using robust physiological phenotypes. The genetic variants provide hypotheses that are ripe for direct experimental testing in isogenic iPS cell models. Fortunately, many diseases of interest to NHLBI can be modeled in iPS-derived tissues. Other part of NIH (e.g. NIMH, NIDA, NIAAA ) lack abundance of high probability genetic "hits" that NHLBI now has. NHLBI should take advantage of this opportunity.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Bruce Conklin

Voting

-19 net votes
8 up votes
27 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Preserving and promoting expertise in integrative physiology

From my perspective, one of the key “critical challenges” facing the NHLBI in particular, and medical science in general, is to avoid being blinded by the promises of the reductionists in the “personalized, precision medicine” of the future. In order to understand the advances being made at the molecular level, we need to preserve and promote expertise in truly integrative physiology, what I like to call “PHYSIOMICS”. ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Unfortunately, human physiologists are being squeezed out of the medical industrial complex by the basic scientists on one end, and the epidemiologists on the other. Most departments of medicine now require on 80/20 commitment to have a significant research component of an academic career, and it is becoming increasingly difficult for those few of us physiologists remaining to compete with the pressures of both research funding and clinical mandates. I urge the leadership at NHLBI to preserve a strong focus on human physiology, and continue to support the small, but high resolution studies that are required to answer key research questions. I would submit that studying an individual patient’s unique physiology is as much “personalized” or “precision” medicine as it is to read their genome. Remember, despite billions of dollars of research support, there remains nothing better to predict the risk of diabetes, than a simple measure of waist size!

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Benjamin Levine

Voting

6 net votes
16 up votes
10 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Bringing Personalized Biochemistry and Biophysics to Bear on Problems of Personalized Heart, Lung and Blood Medicine

Precision medicine will provide unprecedented opportunities to tailor health care based on knowledge of personal patterns of genetic variations. These variations usually impact protein or RNA sequences, resulting in altered properties. These alterations can result in increased susceptibility to a particular disease or intolerance to common therapeutics. To take full advantage of knowing a patient’s set of gene variations, ...more »

Submitted by (@chuck.sanders)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

As detailed in the attached review (Kroncke et al. Biochemistry 2015, 54, 2551−2559) the successful practice of personalized medicine will in many cases require a molecular-level understanding of the nature of the defects that are caused by disease-predisposing genetic variations. As widespread personal genome sequencing becomes routine, numerous genetic variations (many millions) of uncertain significance will be discovered. Using both experimental and computational tools associated with the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, and structural biology it is in many cases possible to ascertain whether a newly-discovered gene variation adversely impacts a critical protein or RNA function and, if so, how. Among various clinical applications this information can be used (i) to project whether a patient not currently showing symptoms for a particular disease is likely to present with that disease in the future (sometimes enabling prophylactic therapy), (ii) to help establish the molecular etiology of a disease currently afflicting the patient, and (iii) to guide the therapeutic strategy pursued for that patient.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

My lab is already participating in a project (RO1 HL122010) with two other labs (those of Drs. Jens Meiler--Vanderbilt and Alfred George--Northwestern) to develop personalized biochemical and biophysical approaches for application to genetic variations impacting the KCNQ1 gene, potentially predisposing patients to long QT syndrome, a cardiac arrhythmia. However, our project deals with one gene and one disorder only. There clearly is a need for improved and expanded communication and collaboration between those practicing personalized/precision medicine and those who are well-equipped to provide medically actionable molecular insight using the approaches of personalized biochemistry, biophysics, and structural biology.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Charles R. Sanders, Prof. of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University (With Drs. Alfred George--Northwestern University and Jens Meiler--Vanderbilt University)

Voting

-2 net votes
9 up votes
11 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Translational Bioinformatics Spanning Multiple Scales of Biologic Complexity to Implement Precision Pulmonary Medicine at the Po

What translational bioinformatics tools could be used in pulmonary medicine to allow multidimensional, multi-scale modeling of clinical and biomolecular data to assist clinical decision-making?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Deployment of bioinformatics tools to construct multi-dimensional, multi-scale models of pulmonary (mal)functioning from large heterogeneous data sets spanning biological molecules, subcellular compartments, signaling pathways, cells, tissues, organs, organ systems and clinical therapeutics trials to predict actionable precision medicine for clinicians at the point of pulmonary care.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

A variety of existing powerful informatics methods for integrating a vast wealth of clinical and high-dimensional data across DNA to organism compartments to develop multi-scale modeling approaches to improve point-of-care precision medicine. Consistent with a continuous learning healthcare system, precision medicine modeling is recursive, tentative pending better understanding and therefore continuously learning.

Fundamental to implementation of precision medicine is the ability to extract heterogeneous data from basic and clinical research to be integrated systematically into clinical practice in a cohesive and large-scale manner. Deployment of precision medicine models to predict (mal)functioning progression and response the treatment in daily practice relies strongly on the availability of an efficient bioinformatics platform that assists in the translation of basic and clinical science knowledge.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

-2 net votes
10 up votes
12 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Efficient Evidence-Based Practice

How can we most efficiently utilize limited resources/manpower to facilitate adherence to evidence-based practices and enhance public health?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

5 net votes
14 up votes
9 down votes
Active