Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Addressing Unrecognized and Over Diagnosis of COPD

How can we create precision diagnostics for COPD in practice settings that will help inform the transition from screening to better diagnosis and treatment strategies and that will help identify patients or communities at highest risk for unrecognized or over diagnosed COPD.

Submitted by (@jsullivan)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

About 12 million individuals are estimated to have undiagnosed COPD and in most cases patients aren’t diagnosed until they have lost over half of their lung function leading to worse outcomes short and long term. Conversely there are challenges with over and mis diagnosed COPD that can result in over treatment and incorrect treatment. Fine tuning screening, diagnostic and management tools can result in earlier and proper identification of disease, earlier initiation of risk mitigation and/or treatment strategies and improved health outcomes as well as improved efficiencies in the healthcare system.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : COPD Foundation, Nancy Leidy, COPDF MASAC

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11 net votes
12 up votes
1 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Durable gene activity map at the individual level

A durable gene activity map of the individual to understand when certain gene sets are on vs off or dysfunctional over an individual’s lifetime as one way of guiding the precision of medicine for that patient. It would need to be person portable and universally exportable and interpretable across all of the EHRs.

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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2 net votes
3 up votes
1 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Balancing Risks and Benefits: How Do Clinical Guidelines in Cardiovascular Medicine Promote the Health of an Individual?

Much of the hopes for precision medicine (as outlined Dr. Dr. Collins) are based on deriving large amounts of genomic, proteomic, epigenomic and metabolomic data on large cohorts of patients. It will take decades to build these cohorts and even more time to analyze them and derive specific conclusions on how these will help individualize treatments. However, there is a pressing need for how to individualize contemporary ...more »

Submitted by (@jalees)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Decisions on whether or not to place a patient with atrial fibrillation on chronic anticoagulation or on statin therapy are often based on guidelines and cardiovascular risk calculators.

 

Patients with a higher risk of stroke are more likely to receive anticoagulation and patients with a higher risk of a myocardial infarction are more likely to receive statin therapy.

 

However, these cardiovascular risk calculators do not really take into account the potential side effects and impact on the lifestyle of the patients.

 

Physicians will stop anticoagulation in a patient with atrial fibrillation if the patient has suffered a life-threatening bleed but there are no specific evidence-based guidelines as to how one should proceed if the bleeding is minor.

 

it is easy to compute the cardiovascular risk and overall mortality benefit of placing a patient on statins but how does one factor in the impact that statins have on the quality of life of an individual?

 

Developing novel evidence-based approaches to individualize therapies that factor in cardiovascular benefits as well as potential side effects and diminished quality of life could have a major impact on appropriately using treatments and reduce the arbitrariness of some medical decisions.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Jalees Rehman

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1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Study on key product factors for optimal Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) graft function

Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) collected by Apheresis is the most common source used for BMT. How the cells are collected and what kinds of cells are collected can affect BMT graft function. Limited studies have been done to study the key product factors in relationship to optimal graft function. Questions remain such as the optimal lymphocytes contents for reduced infection post BMT, optimal megakaryocyte precursor ...more »

Submitted by (@yanyunw)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Optimal cell therapy products can lead to reduced post BMT complication and reduced morbidity and mortality.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

In vitro, animal studies, clinical samples can be used for key product factors for optimal BMT graft function.

These can be achieved if funding is available, as there are many centers perform allo and auto BMT.

Funding support is critically needed in this area.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Yanyun Wu on behalf of ASFA

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70 net votes
93 up votes
23 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Stem Cell Biology

There is a need to develop “designer platelets” and “designer red cells,” as well as facilitate large-scale production of these products for therapeutic and diagnostic use.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The reprogramming of adult stem cells has resulted in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can develop into any tissue of the body. These iPSCs ultimately may be used as a transplantable source of stem cells for a variety of hematologic diseases. Although this technology has enabled the generation of patient-specific or disease-specific stem cells that are also amenable to genetic manipulation, the major scientific hurdle has been the ability to create clinically meaningful functional blood products, including transplantable HSCs from differentiating iPSCs. The production of clinically functional blood products -- i.e. red blood cells derived from autologous iPSCs --could replace allogeneic products in highly immunized patients and the generation of megakaryocytes for patient-specific platelet production from iPSCs could drive significant progress in this area. Furthermore, disease-specific iPSCs could serve as targets for both drug development and drug screening in patients with rare hematologic disorders. In addition, support for scale-up and GMP processes, which are difficult to fund via the R01 mechanism will require specific grant opportunities tailored to infrastructure and process development.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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25 net votes
53 up votes
28 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Understanding Chronic Lung Disease Subtypes

What are the subtypes of chronic obstructive lung disease that share a common pathogenesis and can be a basis for precision medicine?

Submitted by (@jdc000)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a complex heterogeneous syndrome. The current approach of regarding this disease as a single entity has limited the ability to develop effective therapies and prevention. Understanding the major subtypes of COPD could lead to more biologically relevant disease classifications, improved prognostic information, and precision medicine treatment.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The optimal analytical approaches and data types to define complex disease subtypes have not been determined.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Ed Silverman, James Crapo and COPDGene Executive Committee

Voting

32 net votes
50 up votes
18 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Best Implementation Strategies

What are the best implementation strategies to improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines, protocols, and other evidence-based practices that actually lead to the elimination of inequities in preventable disability and death from heart, lung, blood, and sleep diseases?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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12 net votes
20 up votes
8 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The role of Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) in the prophylaxis and treatment of acute & chronic Graft Versus Host Disease

In Acute Graft Versus Host Disease (aGVHD), we would like to examine whether early and intensified delivery of ECP as part of standard prophylaxis will decrease overall corticosteroid exposure while preserving expected relapse rates in patients undergoing unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) is common after HSCT (30-50% recipients) and is a major contributor to late transplant-related ...more »

Submitted by (@js2745)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Patients who develop aGVHD undergo toxic therapy with high-dose corticosteroids, often for long durations, resulting in high morbidity and treatment related mortality. Alternatively, T cell depletion of the donor graft to reduce GVHD is associated with high rates of infection and relapse of the disease that led to the HSCT. Targeting other pathways of GVHD pathogenesis may preserve the beneficial immune reconstitution and graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects, while ameliorating the severity of GVHD. One such pathway involves regulatory T cells (T regs), which inhibit T cell alloreactivity, and are correlated with the incidence and severity of GVHD without loss of GVT. To date, there is no consensus on a standard second-line therapy for aGVHD, and current approaches focus mainly on intensification of immunosuppression. Addressing this compelling question will help to decrease overall corticosteroid exposure while preserving the expected relapse rates in patients undergoing unrelated donor HSCT.

 

Appropriate initial therapy for cGVHD involves high doses & prolonged use (yrs) of corticosteroids, while patients still develop irreversible sclerotic manifestations of disease. Early intervention prior to disease onset may help prevent cGVHD development or lessen its severity, requiring less corticosteroid exposure. Addressing the compelling question for cGVHD will help decrease exposure to drugs with associated morbidity, while preserving expected relapse rates in these patients.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Feasibility:

 

* GVHD has relatively high incidence after HSCT and at the same time there is a lack of consensus on standard second line therapy for the disease. Thus, there will be increased interest in developing and participation in those studies.

 

** ECP is generally well tolerated and complications are infrequent.

 

*** There is a great potential for multi-discipline collaboration approach in this patients’ population.

 

*** There is an opportunity to engage industry partners in the design and support for these studies.

 

**** There are numerous scientific opportunities for meritorious science as there have been limited systematic studies of ECP mechanisms of as well as standardization of apheresis protocols based on GVHD disease state.

 

 

 

Challenges:

 

* Limited number of institutions providing ECP treatment.

 

** Cost of the procedures (although Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services now covers ECP for cGVHD).

 

*** There is a very limited number of animal models available for apheresis research in general, and studies of the mechanism(s) of action of photopheresis have been very limited as well as difficult and expensive to perform. However understanding pathological mechanisms and its relationship to response to apheresis is critical for optimization and advancement of patient care.

 

****Lack of infra-structure for apheresis research.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Joseph Schwartz on behalf of ASFA

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103 net votes
126 up votes
23 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

New technologies for Personalized health monitoring: too much or not enough

The development of personalized medicine and the increasing amount of information extracted from individual and patients throughout their life is expected to growth significantly. Multiple types of physiological sensors are currently embedded in everyday-life objects and yet their clinical value and their potential to improve health care is not well defined. It seems fundamental that the NIH develops a core research group/ ...more »

Submitted by (@heartjpc)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The impact of this compelling question would promote the development of the right technologies for monitoring physiological signals at long-term. Also, this question should be addressed in collaboration with other federal agencies and institutes such as the NSF and the FDA. Both these agencies are currently supporting and reviewing new-long term technologies but the understanding of the impact of these novel techniques remains to be studied.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

none

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5 net votes
13 up votes
8 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

A Collaboration Market Place for Industry and Academia to advance Translational Medicine

There is a vast amount of data regarding specific gene and protein targets, especially in the post genomics era with many well validated targets, and even more "strong candidates". Drug companies have libraries of compounds that could be good inhibitors/enhancers for these new targets but lack an internal program, IP of the target, or a sufficiently large market to initiate risky and expensive drug screens, let alone ...more »

Submitted by (@ims000)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

An NHLBI sponsored and funded "Market Place" could be set up to partner drug companies seeking funds to perform earlier phase screens with academic investigators seeking funds to learn more about their protein target or advance a therapy. NHLBI could fund a successfully paired collaboration up to 100% of the cost, with a sliding scale of matched-costs from the industrial partner based on their market capitalization (e.g. big Pharma at 100%, Medium Pharma at 50%, and early-stage Pharma at 0%)

 

Well thought-out global contractual agreements for "non-disclosure" and "IP sharing", beneficial to both parties before and after initial 'pairing' of a collaboration, would significantly enhance the speed and feasibility of the studies.

 

More compounds could be tested for more targets, addressing rarer conditions, or common conditions where only a small proportion of the affected cases are impacted by mutations or deficiency of the target proteins.

 

Drug companies would be incentivized to examine more targets without necessarily needing a large market for a future drug.

 

Later stage studies – pre-clinical, Phase 1, and Phase 2 – could then be re-championed at the Market Place for additional NHLBI funding, either with new partners or the same partners to further advance successful compounds.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Contractual negotiations between Industry and Academia/Clinicians is a significant barrier to Translational Medicine and personalized medicine in particular.

 

Often ideas are not shared simply due to a lack of non-disclosure agreements in place. A Market-place to share ideas behind a well-structured “non-disclosure” firewall at the NHLBI website would facilitate the speed of discussion and stimulate collaboration.

 

Funding within industry can be limited by board and share-holder goals. There is typically little incentive to advance translational programs at early stages with no or limited medium or long-term financial benefits. Providing funding to facilitate and perform these research collaborations would incentivize Pharma to collaborate with academics who may hold IP or data on novel targets discovered with NHLBI funding.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : PhDIdeas

Voting

27 net votes
45 up votes
18 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Influence of the Gut Microbiome on Pulmonary Immunity in HIV-Infected Individuals

It has become increasingly clear that gut microbiota have a tremendous impact on human health and disease. While it is well known that commensal gut bacteria are crucial in maintaining immune homeostasis in the intestine, there is also evidence of indirect effects on the lung. Multiple studies have shown that alterations in gut microbiota can lead to severe defects in pulmonary immune responses and reduced ability to ...more »

Submitted by (@brent.palmer)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

HIV-infected individuals are at significant risk of developing and dying from infectious and non-infectious pulmonary complications. Alteration of gut microbiota have been shown to have dramatic effects on pulmonary immunity and severity of lung infections. For instance, multiple studies have indicated that probiotic treatment with certain Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains results in reduced incidence and severity of upper respiratory tract infections in children. Similarly, a recent study showed that treatment with the minimally absorbed antibiotic neomycin was associated with alterations in gut microbiota composition and concomitant reduced pulmonary immunity and the inability to control Influenza infection in mice. It was recently described that HIV infection is associated with a dramatic alteration in gut microbiota and that these changes persist with antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thus, it is important to understand how these alterations may effect lung immunity, since the majority of HIV-infected individuals develop pulmonary infections. Furthermore, gut microbiota contribute to development of non-infectious complications such as atherosclerosis, metabolic disease, obesity and diabetes. It is thus highly plausible that the gut microbiota may also play a role in the development of non-infectious complications of the lung such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension, the rates of which are elevated in HIV-infected individuals.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

A better understanding of how alterations in gut microbiota associated with HIV infection affects pulmonary infectious and noninfectious complication could lead to therapies to protect this “at risk” group. Furthermore, manipulation of the gut microbiota in HIV-infected individuals using pro- and/or pre-biotics, antibiotics or diet modification to a composition that is associated with increased pulmonary immunity, reduced infections and lung complications are all low risk therapeutic strategies that could substantially improve lung heath in these individuals.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Brent Palmer (NHLBI-INHALD group member) and Catherine Lozupone

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3 net votes
7 up votes
4 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Stem Cell Immunology

We now can create critical cell types like cardiomyocytes etc. from stem cells. Additionally, we are learning the rules of using these cells to rebuild tissues. A major gap in our knowledge relates to the immunobiology of these cells. Lessons from transplantation medicine are only partially applicable, because solid organs are more complex and likely more immunogenic than defined cell populations. How does the immune ...more »

Submitted by (@murry0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

We now can generate large quantities of critical cell types whose deficiencies underlie many chronic diseases like heart failure. This breakthrough brings us to the next-level impediment: the immune system. While induced pluripotent stem cells have the potential to obviate rejection, in practical terms this is cost-prohibitive: It will cost huge amounts of money to produce and qualify a single patient's cell dose. Moreover, human cardiomyocytes are potent when given to infarcted hearts in the acute or sub-acute phase of infarction, but they have no benefit with chronic heart failure. The 6 months required to produce iPSC-cardiomyocytes precludes their autologous use for myocardial infarction.

 

We need an off the shelf cell therapy product for myocardial infarction that can be mass produced and qualified for large numbers of patients. This means an allogeneic product is necessary. Identifying the immune response to cardiomyocytes or other cell products will teach us how to precisely immunosuppress the patient, thereby minimizing complications, or alternatively, how to engineer the cells so as to avoid immunogenicity in the first place.

 

Lessons from the study of cardiomyocyte transplantation could extend to dopamine neurons, pancreatic beta-cells, retinal cells, myelinating cells and many other areas that cause common chronic disease.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

We know a great deal of transplant immunology from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (graft versus host) and from solid organ transplantation (host versus graft). There are good mouse and large animal (including non-human primate) models of stem cell differentiation and organ transplantation. This offers low hanging fruit where, in perhaps 5 years, we could discern the critical similarities and differences between transplanting stem cell derivatives and organ or marrow transplantation. These studies will inform clinical trials of allogeneic human stem cell derivatives that will be underway by then.

 

Success in this area will require bringing together researchers interested in stem cell biology and transplant immunology. A properly resourced RFA from NIH could be just the thing needed to promote this interaction.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Charles Murry, MD, PhD

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23 net votes
45 up votes
22 down votes
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