Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Making It Real: Affordable Physiologically Relevant In Vitro Environments

We have done the best we can to mimic the human internal environment in vitro for the discovery, testing, and validation of therapeutics, but there is a critical need to do better. The use of more complex cell-based in vitro models is the result of the recognition of how little predictive power there is in current experimental conditions, even with animal models. With an in vitro environment that goes beyond temperature ...more »

Submitted by (@ahenn0)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Better disease models

Many diseases of the heart, lung and blood systems are studied using animal models, often with genetically engineered mice. However, while mice get models, humans get diseases. Too many grants are devoted to curing models, a practice encouraged by many high profile journals who want to see “proof” in a standard model of disease. Much less time, effort and money will be wasted on developing ineffective therapies if focus ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

The CRISPER-Cas challenge: Need to re-phenotype KO animals?

Because traditional knock out models and CRISP/Cas models often show different phenotypes for the same gene deletion, do we need to re-phenotype hundreds/thousands of knock out animal models and revisit the conclusions of many studies based on using these animal models? This research may not appear very innovative but may be very important for drawing correct conclusions about gene functions and interactions - should ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Challenge

Genetic or biologic makers that predict outcomes in pulmonary fibrosis are needed.

Validated animal models of lung fibrosis that better resemble the human condition are needed to speed up the drug development process.

An international patient registry is needed to help promote understanding of the natural history of pulmonary fibrosis and real-world impacts of interventions.

Submitted by (@swigrisj)

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