Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Detection of rupture prone small aortic aneurysms

Critical challenges in the assessment of aortic aneurysms are: (1) Availability of reliable animal models that simulate the human pathology, (2) Availability of molecular imaging resources – identification of biomarkers, development of targeted imaging probes and pre-clinical imaging methods, and plasma markers that predict whether an aneurysm is prone to rupture or dissection, (3) Bringing together a wide array of multi-disciplinary ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Developing clinically viable methods to detect rupture prone aneurysms can lead to better methods of diagnosis and intervention and avoid preventable fatalities

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Several other disease areas including oncological that had similar gap was filled by NIH (NCI) and the challenges were overcome in less than 10 years. The scientific expertise to fill the gap exists, however they work in silos, which need to be brought together to fulfil this gap and is achievable in less than 10 years

Assessment of aortic aneurysms that are prone to rupture or dissection has been an elusive target. Current clinical practice measures the aortic diameter and fails to relate to the pathophysiology and biomechanical properties of the aneurysm in deciding preventive surgery. Critical gap exists in the diagnosis of aneurysm especially with small aneurysms (3 - 5 cm in diameter) that are rupture prone. Based on autopsy about 10 percent of individuals with small abdominal aneurysms had undergone fatal rupture, while 40 percent with diameters of 7-10 cm had intact aneurysm and died from other causes. International Registry of Aortic Dissection found that 40% of thoracic aneurysms dissected at diameters smaller than 5 cm.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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7 net votes
18 up votes
11 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Basic and Clinical Multi-disciplinary Partnerships to Understand Lung Disease

Basic scientists and clinicians have different training and bring different perspectives to lung disease research. Additionally, mechanisms that facilitate interactions of scientists from different fields may improve communication and facilitate novel ideas for lung disease research. I would like to see a funding mechanism that encouraged such partnerships in addressing fundamental disease questions and/or treatments. ...more »

Submitted by (@bmoore)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This mechanisms could bring more perspectives to bear on questions in lung disease and would facilitate multi-disciplinary interactions and ideas.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

If single awards, budgets would need to be large enough to allow for funding basic science as well as providing dollars to collect clinical samples. It should be possible to support some core facility infrastructure if needed and allow a budget that could account for basic scientists, animal work, study coordinators, clinicians, etc. Perhaps the RFA could require at least 3 different fields to be represented to try to facilitate multi-disciplinary approaches. Such a mechanism could help replace the loss of grants like SCOR grants and PPGs.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Beth Moore

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3 net votes
11 up votes
8 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Integrated Research Training

There is a need to encourage the development and growth of integrated and multi-disciplinary biomedical research skills needed to utilize emerging technology, infrastructure, and paradigms, including the development of competitive research training strategies that embrace the role of multi-institutional and professional scientific organization research collaboration.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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8 net votes
16 up votes
8 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Heart transplant surveillance

It is essential to develop clinically viable, non-invasive, less expensive technologies for the surveillance of allograft rejection in heart transplant patients. Critical challenges that exist in the near term or long term surveillance after transplant is the unavailability of molecular and cellular level markers that can be non-invasively imaged and quantified detect rejection and thus improve patient survival. Development ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Development of methods for near term or long term surveillance after transplant can help detect the rejection and thus improve patient survival

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The fast growth in the imaging technologies and molecular and cellular imaging technologies are gaining foot in cardiovascular sciences and should be feasible within a decade

The current surveillance to detect transplant rejection requires repeated testing with endo myocardial biopsy and catheter angiography. Both technologies are highly invasive and very expensive. Post-transplant surveillance is focused on the cellular rejection in the near term after transplant and cardiac allograft vasculopathy in the long term.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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1 net vote
14 up votes
13 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Advancing translational research requires timely in-depth analysis of large datasets

1. NHLBI investments over the last decade in terms of genomic approaches have yielded many research findings. 2. Rapid analyses of early data identified the "low hanging" fruit (and perhaps some/many important results were missed); this limited the scope of translation (partly because of relatively limited discovery?) 3. Important data are being generated at much greater rate than the data are processed/analyzed thoughtfully. ...more »

Submitted by (@rao000)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

If we invest in a few multi-disciplinary data analysis centers (integrating biology with statistical genetics) involving active NHLBI participation (cooperative agreements), the massive amounts of data generated at huge cost could be analyzed more thoughtfully if time and resources are made available. This way, we may be able to identify many more research findings of much greater potential for translation.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

It is feasible to pursue this challenge through cooperative agreements whereby NHLBI scientists can actively participate and ensure that strategic investing is following strategic paths for deep discovery.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : DC Rao

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1 net vote
11 up votes
10 down votes
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