Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Developing tools/algorithms for objective evaluation of sleep health

What are the best tools/algorithms for robust and objective evaluations of sleep health biomarkers?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Sleep deficiency is pervasive in today’s society and associated with an array of threats to health and public safety. The availability of a biomarker(s) for sleep health would turn-the-curve on developing practical and feasible ways to identify individuals at risk for sleep deficiency and prevent/manage associated risks to health and public safety on a large-scale.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Sleep and circadian regulation is coupled to an array of behavioral, physiological and molecular/genetic processes to leverage in the development of biomarkers for sleep health.

Untreated sleep disorders and sleep deficiency pose a significant burden on health and public safety. There is currently no biomarker, or point-of-care technology available to objectively measure an individual’s level of sleep deficiency or susceptibility, a significant barrier to prevention and management.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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124 net votes
162 up votes
38 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Prodromal symptoms and signs of a heart attack/acute coronary syndrome

Can early warning symptoms and signs of a heart attack (acute coronary syndrome) be quantified through standardized symptom surveys, biochemical measures, electrocardiographic, or other diagnostic means to enable earlier evaluation and treatment?

Submitted by (@mmhand)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

If patients could detect symptoms that have been demonstrated prospectively to herald an impending heart attack and/or if there were sensitive biochemical, electrocardiographic, or other tests that could be performed by patients/bystanders (e.g., in the home setting), by emergency medical services personnel, primary care providers or others in community settings to assist with decision support about seeking intervention for early symptoms/signs of an acute coronary syndrome, this would potentially save thousands of lives from heart attacks and sudden cardiac death.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Prodromal heart attack symptoms (waxing and waning of symptoms in advance of complete vessel occlusion) have not been prospectively described or quantified. The standard symptom constellations from epidemiologic surveys have been described for heart attack symptoms (ACS) though there is variability in symptom data collection among heart attack surveys as well. Also while there are biochemical tests for muscle damage (troponin), there is not a biochemical test for ischemia such as could be applied in the home or work setting. Similarly it would be helpful if a self-applied electrocardiogram by patients/bystanders could give a diagnosis of early ischemia (prior to occlusion) so patients could seek observational care.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mary Hand

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-2 net votes
1 up votes
3 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improving patient-centered outcome assessments in HLBS studies

What types of newer patient-centered quality of life assessment tools can be employed in heart, lung, blood and sleep studies so that they can be validated and refined to improve our measurement of quality of life outcomes in populations of interest to NHLBI?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Improving our ability to precisely measure heart, lung, blood, and sleep patients' quality of life can enable evaluation of a treatment's impact on patient-centered outcomes such as overall quality of life and its components -- pain, symptoms, and a patients' social, psychological, and physical functioning.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

New tools have been developed, notably through the PROMIS common fund project, that allow potentially more precise, reliable, valid and sensitive measurement of Q of L outcomes, with less patient burden. These tools are available but require validation in HLBS populations to allow widespread adoption and routine use in NHLBI-supported clinical trials and population studies.

Advances in biomedical science mean we are living longer with chronic diseases, and the goal of treatment increasingly focuses on disease management, maximizing function, and improving quality of life, not just lengthening life. In addition, patient-centered approaches to health care encourage a view of patients as “whole persons” with emphasis on function and capturing the "patient's voice," not just mortality/morbidity outcomes. Functional and quality of life outcomes, e.g., assessment of pain, symptoms, emotional distress, physical & social functioning, are critically important outcomes to many HLBS patients, but their measurement requires self-reports of patient experiences and thus pose challenges to precise, valid and reliable assessment.

 

Assessment tools using computerized adaptive testing (CAT), such as those developed in the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) project, have been shown to be precise, valid, sensitive to change and easier to administer than traditional Q of L measures in a limited number of studies, but they require validation in HLBS patient populations before they can be used more widely in NHLBI-funded studies.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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11 net votes
20 up votes
9 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Enhancing Understanding of Determinants of Health in Rural Areas & Developing Solutions

What are the biological, environmental, social and economic determinants of health in rural areas related to COPD and other lung disease.

Submitted by (@gacdk0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

There are extreme disparities in the impact of COPD in rural areas, especially in rural Appalachia. These areas experience much larger prevalence rates and higher rates of hospitalization, readmissions and other health indicators that contribute to increased cost and decreased quality of life. These are also areas with the least ability to make improvements. Research that can inform both the causes of these disparities and identify proven methods for systematically confronting these issues has the potential to dramatically improve overall health status in rural America

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Grace Anne Dorney Koppel

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7 net votes
8 up votes
1 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Theoretical division of NHLBI

Many functional physiology, cellular physiology , electrophysiology, and other aspects are amenable to rigorous mathematical methods.NHLBI lacks a theoretical division where IDEAS expressed mathematically make testable predictions at multi scale levels. NHLBI LACKS A THEORETICAL DIVISION- although history has shown that virtually all original ideas have a mathematically expressible foundation, particularly when dynamic, ...more »

Submitted by (@sjk000)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

the impact is obvious in the sense that predicton based on theory can lead to new discovery

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sandor j Kovacs

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-13 net votes
12 up votes
25 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Vascular disease awareness

Increase awareness of vascular disease in the population. Public recognition and understanding is poor, despite high prevalence. ­ Improve public education about vascular diseases, the risk factors, early signs, and treatment.

Submitted by (@societyforvascularsurgery)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society for Vascular Surgery

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1 net vote
2 up votes
1 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

RFA on EC-cardiomyocyte interactions in the mechanisms and treatments of cardiovascular diseases

Often under recognized, the cardiac endothelial cells are highly abundant in the heart, and may have important roles in modulating cardiac function, besides simply serving as structural component of blood vessels. Evidences of ours and others have indicated an emerging role of cardiac endothelial cells signaling to cardiomyocytes to mediate important pathophysiological responses. Nonetheless, detailed mechanisms of ...more »

Submitted by (@hcai00)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Successfully addressing this question would no double reveal novel mechanisms and ways of monitoring treatment responses of cardiovascular disease, ultimately leading to novel drug targets, valuable biomarkers and extended new directions of basic research as well.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Tools of studying these cells are mostly available. Both adult cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells from the heart can be isolated and cultured, although cardiomyotyes need to used within 24 hrs and cannot be passaged. However successful preparation of these cells from WT and transgenic animals would permit co-culture experiments and mechanistic studies. These cells can also be studied using in-situ techniques either detecting molecular changes/events or dynamic interactions. Potential challenges would side in selective targeting of these cells, for example, either ECs or cardiomyocytes, once a potential therapeutic is in the testing. Nonetheless, PECAM-ab conjugated techniques have been employed to specifically deliver proteins to endothelial cells, so I am confident most of the challenges can be worked out, particularly within a RFA awardees group with frequent exchanges of ideas.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Hua Linda Cai, University of California Los Angeles

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27 net votes
30 up votes
3 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Making R01 funding work for the Medical Sciences

We need to spread R01 funding around more to ensure that the best science has funding adequate to move forward. To do this I believe changing how we think about R01 funding and expenditures can be used to put the NIH funds to better use. Too often successful researchers have the majority of their salaries on R01s and the institutions have little skin in the game. PI salaries can be a large part of the escalating budget ...more »

Submitted by (@wjones7)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The impact of spreading the funding would be to improve funding rates, improve funding of new investigators, and supporting more diverse science. Negative impacts would include reduced funding some large labs. In my experience, in some cases, this would be a good thing. There could be special programs and exceptions for large labs that make significant important contributions and serve as resources to reduce negative impact. Review of grants should include information on manuscript retractions and large labs with many retractions should be carefully scrutinized for defunding.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Such changes would have to be made incrementally over time since this will require states and institutions to pick up some of the cost of science and therefore must be phased in to allow for time to adjust the workforce in specific places to align with budgetary constraints. Institutions might be encouraged to do more fundraising to actually support science to fill gaps.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Keith Jones with major input from Pieter de Tombe

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28 net votes
44 up votes
16 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Palliative and hospice care for COPD patients

Does palliative care and/or hospice care as practiced across communities improve end-of-life care for COPD – specifically, does it reduce the burden of symptoms, improve HRQoL and satisfaction, reduce utilization in last 6 months of life (i.e. hospital visits, cost, invasive ventilation use, etc), improve the end-of-life experience, and increase the concordance of place of death to expressed patient preferences?

Submitted by (@k.willard)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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12 net votes
16 up votes
4 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improve vascular healing and extend long term benefit of interventions

How can we develop new approaches to improve vascular healing and extend the long term benefits of vascular interventions for more patients?

Submitted by (@societyforvascularsurgery)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

­The response to vascular injury, whether it be catheter interventions, bypass surgery, or chronic implants, is a reactive process characterized by inflammation, cell proliferation, and fibrosis leading to failure. Better understanding of the mechanisms of vessel remodeling, and restoring homeostasis, is needed to improve prediction, develop and translate new treatments. This remains the leading scientific problem in vascular medicine and surgery. New approaches such as proteomics, lipidomics, molecular imaging offer new opportunities in this realm.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society for Vascular Surgery

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0 net votes
1 up votes
1 down votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the effect of variant genes on AVM development in HHT

Natural genetic variation between individuals can influence the outcome of carrying an HHT mutation. Some gene variants may be protective while others may increase the risk of AVM or telangiectasis. By identifying the variant genes that alter risk of AVM may give clues to the molecular mechanisms of AVM formation and provide new drug targets

Submitted by (@mariannes.clancy)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Marianne Clancy MPA

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1 net vote
1 up votes
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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Additional research needed to identify various contributors of obesity

What are the specific contributors of obesity that lead to chronic positive energy balance and surplus energy storage?

Submitted by (@mturner)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Obesity is a health crisis of epic proportions. About 34% of adults in the US have obesity, up from 31 % in 1999 and about 15% in the years 1960 to 1980. The chronic diseases that result from obesity annually cost over $150 billion in weight-related medical bills. Reduction of obesity improves cardiovascular and other health outcomes, yet what is currently known about obesity is inadequate to combat the global obesity epidemic. A comprehensive understanding about the mechanics of obesity may help in developing more effective preventive and treatment strategies, which in turn will substantially improve cardiovascular and other health measures.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Years of obesity research have revealed the complex nature of this disease and its multi-factorial etiology. While research has firmly established the role of energy balance in weight gain and weight loss, it is important to discover upstream factors that predispose only certain individuals to energy imbalance. This may be addressed by further focusing on newly identified putative contributors of obesity, including but not limited to the impact of sleep deprivation, ambient temperature, age at first pregnancy, intrauterine and intergenerational factors, neuro-endocrine factors, epigenetics, environmental chemicals and endocrine disruptors, gut microbes, infections and the immune system, and social and behavioral factors associated with obesogenic behaviors. These studies may provide mechanistic insight that may also lead to the development of new pharmacological approaches. It is possible that cause-specific prevention or treatment approaches may yield more effective results than generic approaches that do not necessarily consider upstream modulators of energy imbalance, or inter-individual differences.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : The Obesity Society

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8 net votes
18 up votes
10 down votes
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