Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

A comparison of community- and hospital-based pulmonary rehabilitation programs

Compelling Question Text:

 

What is the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of community-based vs. hospital-based pulmonary rehabilitation programs?

Submitted by (@dmcgowan)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The ability to reach more patients in need of recommended treatment for the COPD patient.

The availability is not always easy with transportation, cost, and coverage issues being the importatnt factors.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Easily feasible to address for home or community availability, like YMCAs, Senior Centers.

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10 net votes
11 up votes
1 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Circadian-coupled rhythms in lung health

Does the homeostasis and health of the lung depend on circadian-coupled genomic function?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The circadian genome is a highly conserved system producing 24-hr rhythms in gene expression in the lung. Uncovering the molecular/cellular pathways under circadian control and their significance would provide a new generation of mechanistic understanding of lung health and development.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Delineating circadian mechanisms of lung function would enable new strategies to phenotype, diagnose, and mange lung disease to be developed and tested.

Over the past decade, new discovery has uncovered a mechanistic interface between the circadian clock and fundamental cellular processes including oxidative stress, cell metabolism, immune and inflammatory responses, epigenetic modification, hypoxia/hyperoxia response pathways, endoplasmic reticular stress, autophagy, and regulation of the stem cell environment. While each of these processes is involved in lung function, the significance of circadian regulation in the development and maintenance of lung health is not well-understood.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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11 net votes
25 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

What is the comparative effectiveness of short-term vs. chronic (e.g., 12 mo) pulmonary rehabilitation?

What is the comparative effectiveness of short-term vs. chronic (e.g. 12 mos) pulmonary rehabilitation on survival, patient-reported outcomes (symptom frequency, activities of daily living, quality of life, sleep quality, exacerbations), healthcare utilization, and costs from a societal and healthcare system perspective?

Submitted by (@jakris)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Modest sized efficacy trials demonstrate substantial health benefits, that wane as Pulmonary rehabilitation is discontinued. We need to test the health and resource implications of "chronic" (e.g., 12 or 24 mos) pulmonary rehabilitation. Such information will benefit health systems seeking to implement care models for high-risk, costly, patients - patients with COPD are of increasing interest to health systems. Such a comparative effectiveness trial should also involve behavioral interventions to promote self-management and involve caregivers.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Jerry Krishnan

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26 net votes
32 up votes
6 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Developing Standards of Care for adult muscular dystrophy (FSHD, DM) patients affected by hypercarbic respiratory insufficiency

There is an unmet need for the NHLBI to foster basic, preclinical and clinical research on the pulmonary consequences of respiratory insufficiency, and specifically with hypercarbic (high CO2) respiratory insufficiency, in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and other adult muscular dystrophies. The adult muscular dystrophies have received insufficient attention, both from research and clinical practice perspectives. ...more »

Submitted by (@daniel.perez)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

As with cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia, currently little data is available as to how to best measure/monitor, and when and how to intervene in, the respiratory complications of the adult muscular dystrophies (FSHD, DM, LGMD) using respiratory therapy, non-invasive ventilation (bi-Pap, Trilogy) or ventilation. The absence of home-based sleep studies and technologies to easily assess hypercapnia are identified as a significant gap in knowledge. Additionally, since the cardiac and pulmonary hypercarbic respiratory insufficiency complications are inextricably linked, studies of the interrelationship between cardiac and pulmonary consequences of the muscular dystrophies (congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension) are needed, and interdisciplinary teams of researchers may be best equipped to conduct them.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : FSH Society

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-11 net votes
4 up votes
15 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Challenge

Genetic or biologic makers that predict outcomes in pulmonary fibrosis are needed.

Validated animal models of lung fibrosis that better resemble the human condition are needed to speed up the drug development process.

An international patient registry is needed to help promote understanding of the natural history of pulmonary fibrosis and real-world impacts of interventions.

Submitted by (@swigrisj)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Voting

1 net vote
6 up votes
5 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Pulmonary Rehabilitation

What is the comparative effectiveness of short-term vs. chronic (indefinite) pulmonary rehabilitation on patient-reported outcomes (symptom frequency, activities of daily living, quality of life, sleep quality, exacerbations)?

Submitted by (@fzaidi1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Farhan Zaidi, Jerry Krishnan

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5 net votes
6 up votes
1 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we increase the pharmaceutical clinical research of targeted therapies in pediatric PAH patients, including encouraging

Clinical research, especially randomized pharmaceutical clinical trials, poses many unique challenges compared to research in adult subjects. In pulmonary arterial hypertension, a disease characterized by high blood pressure of the lungs with increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to right ventricular failure, there are 12 FDA-approved PAH-targeted therapies for adults. None of these medications are currently ...more »

Submitted by (@katherinek)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a heterogeneous condition generally characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and increased pulmonary vascular resistance that leads to right heart failure if left untreated. Though some causes of PAH are seen in both adult and pediatric populations, some etiologies are seen exclusively in pediatric populations, including persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, lung hypoplasia, and alveolar capillary dysplasia. Despite these differences in disease etiology, and known physiologic differences in pediatric populations, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in the acute setting is the only approved medication for PAH treatment in children. A number of issues have decreased pediatric PAH pharmaceutical research, including protection of the pediatric population as vulnerable subjects, principle of scientific necessity, balance of risk and potential benefit, parental consent/child assent, and feasibility of pediatric clinical trial design and implementation. Encouraging clinical trials of existing adult medications and potentially emerging, novel agents specifically for pediatrics—either through direct sponsorship or regulatory incentives—would not only lead to better outcomes for pediatric PAH patients, but potentially to a better and more comprehensive characterization of the developing pulmonary vascular system and right ventricle.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Several challenges exist for addressing this critical challenge. First, there are a number of differences between conducting clinical research in pediatric populations compared to adult populations. This not only includes the broad items referenced above, but items as noted by Rose and colleagues related to clinical trial design and analysis including (1) accepted age-matched normal ranges for laboratory values; (2) requirements for the validation of clinical endpoints for the assessment of efficacy and safety; and (3) standards for long-term safety monitoring and pharmacovigilance (Rose K, et al. NEJM 2005). Sponsorship of this type of clinical research is a second concern, which could either be mitigated by direct support from the National Institutes of Health of pediatric PAH clinical trials or in regulatory changes incentivizing pediatric clinical research in rare diseases.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Katherine Kroner, Michael Patrick Gray, PHA

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66 net votes
76 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Anti-angiogentics in pulmonary hypertension

Would anti-angiogenic therapeutics prevent patients with pulmonary hypertension from worsening?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

38 net votes
52 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fibrosis Across Organs: Bringing Together Investigators of Fibrosis of the Heart, Lungs and Bone Marrow

Fibrosis can affect essentially any tissue or organ, including the heart, lungs and bone marrow. Effective anti-fibrotic therapy has long been elusive, and transplantation has been the only therapy capable of restoring patient function as fibrotic diseases progress to organ failure. Although these diseases present clinically with organ-specific manifestations, they are now thought to share many common pathogenetic mechanisms. ...more »

Submitted by (@amtager)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

In the aggregate, diseases characterized by fibrosis have been estimated to account for up to 45% of developed world deaths. Fibrotic diseases addressed by the NHLBI include heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and myelofibrosis (MF), among many others. Each fibrotic disease represents an area of great unmet clinical need, as patients suffer and die with no or limited effective disease-modifying therapies. The impact of developing effective therapies for each of these diseases individually would be great; the impact of developing therapies effective for the entire class of fibrotic diseases across organs would truly be enormous. The clinical burden of HFpEF is staggering – more than 650,000 new patients are diagnosed with heart failure in the US each year, half with diastolic dysfunction. Although not as prevalent, IPF and MF are particularly lethal. IPF has a median survival of approximately three years. MF is arguably the most aggressive of the myeloproliferative disorders and is associated with significantly shortened survival. Although agents such as spironolactone have been unable to treat fibrosis in HFpEF as yet, two anti-fibrotic drugs, pirfenidone and nintedanib, have now been shown to slow progression of IPF, and the oral JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib has been shown to improve MF survival. These early successes underscore the great impact that developing effective anti-fibrotic therapies will have.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This challenge could be addressed by funding research efforts to identify and therapeutically target fundamental pathogenetic mechanisms shared by fibrotic diseases across organs. Although fibrotic diseases present clinically with organ-specific manifestations, there has been a growing appreciation of that these diseases share many aspects of their pathogenesis. Fibrosis In many of these diseases results from recurrent or non-resolving epithelial or endothelial injury, followed by over-exuberant or aberrant mesenchymal cell responses. Across all organs, these processes result in the pathologic accumulation of fibroblasts and extracellular matrix, with distortion of organ architecture and loss of organ function. Core pathways leading to epithelial and endothelial cell injury and senescence, to fibroblast accumulation and persistence, and to altered matrix biochemical and biomechanical properties, are now being identified. Therapeutics developed to target these core pathways could have broad clinical applicability. Funding initiatives aimed at better the characterization of core fibrotic pathways already identified, the identification of new core fibrotic pathways, and the development of therapies to target core fibrotic pathways, could allow the NHLBI to simultaneously and cost-effectively address the great unmet needs of the large patients with any of the many devastating fibrotic diseases that affect the heart, lungs and bone marrow.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Andrew M. Tager

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16 net votes
20 up votes
4 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Increasing Regenerative Medical Strategies in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. Current PAH therapies mainly act of the vasoconstrictive component of the disease; however there is a widely accepted view that another contributor to the disease is an abnormal overgrowth of cells that line the pulmonary arteries, which ...more »

Submitted by (@michaelg)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

In the past twenty years, 12 PAH targeted-therapies have been approved by the FDA. This increase in disease state awareness and in the treatment armamentarium have contributed to an increase in average survival from 2.8 years to an estimated 8-10 years. However, current treatments primarily address the vasoconstrictive component of the disease and do not address the now accepted theory of post-apoptotic overgrowth of hyperproliferative cells of the pulmonary vessels. A number of circulating stem and progenitor cells, derived from the bone marrow, have been identified that could have roles in repair of the pulmonary vascular system when interacting with the quickly, abnormally growing cells in the lung vessels. Work in this area has been named as a future research opportunity in the NHLBI-ORDR Strategic Plan for Lung Vascular Research (Erzurum S, et al. 2010).

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Basic and translational research support is needed—including high-throughput approaches such as phage display and large-scale proteomic analysis—to better understand the relationship between circulating bone marrow-derived cells, lung-resident stem and progenitor cells, and endothelial cells of the pulmonary arterial system.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Pulmonary Hyeprtension Association, Michael Gray, Katie Kroner

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71 net votes
81 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Definitive Evidence of the Effectiveness of Pulmonary Rehabilitation

What is the clinical effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation in reducing hospital admissions and readmissions, improving health outcomes such as exercise tolerance and dyspnea, and positively impacting patient centered outcomes. Does this effectiveness vary based on the types of settings rehab is conducted in, urban vs rural environments, the components to the program, the timing of the program and the overall support ...more »

Submitted by (@gacdk0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Pulmonary rehabilitation is a critical component in the treatment of COPD patients but several barriers persist that have resulted in very limited access to rehab, low referral rates for eligible patients and limited standardization of best practices within the rehab facilities that do exist. Large, definitive studies accounting for patient subgroups, site characteristics and program components can generate the level of evidence needed to expand access, educate providers and improve referral systems and create quality programs. This level of evidence is necessary to change policy to properly value the role of pulmonary rehabilitation and to convince integrated health systems in a value based market that pulmonary rehabilitation is beyond a doubt, a requirement of providing quality COPD care.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Grace Anne Dorney Koppel, COPD Foundation Board of Directors, COPD Patient Advocate

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9 net votes
12 up votes
3 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Development of right ventricular-targeted therapies in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. A great increase in the treatment armamentarium has been noted for this rare disease in the past 20 years, with 12 new PAH-targeted therapies. Though these therapies do improve cardiac performance, this is most likely due to their primary ...more »

Submitted by (@katherinek)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Since 2006, 12 medical therapies for PAH have been approved by the FDA, which have increased survival of this rare disease from around 2.8 years to approximately 9 years; these therapies primarily act by dilating the pulmonary arteries in order to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance to blood flow. However, patients continue to die from right ventricular failure, highlighting the important relationship of the pulmonary arterial system and right ventricle (RV). Despite patients ultimately dying from RV failure, little is known about the effect of the currently available PAH-targeted therapies on RV functional support. Prostacyclins, PDE5i, and sGC agonists are thought to enhance RV contractility—though the long-term effects remain unknown—while ERAs are thought to reduce it. The direct RV effect of some potential therapies targeting the pseudo-malignancy theory of PAH is a concern, as these therapies seek to reduce the hypertrophy and angiogenesis that may actually be supporting the adapting RV. Further, therapies targeting the ventricle directly have historically been centered on the LV—for example β-adrenergic receptor blockers and RAS inhibition—and either remain controversial or without data in the RV. There remains no identified RV-specific therapy to either provide support through increase contractility or molecularly prevent the progression from RV hypertrophy to ultimate failure.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The primary challenge of addressing this CC on the lack of RV-targeted therapies for the treatment of PAH is the comprehensive analysis and support that will need to be provided, spanning from basic to clinical science. To begin, strong support of biologic characterization of the right ventricle needs to be provided. The RV is distinctly different from the more comprehensively studied left ventricle, and subsequently responds differently to autocrine, paracrine, neuroendocrine, pressure, and pharmaceutical changes to name only a few. However, when identified, these RV biologic distinctions can be translated and tested clinically to more comprehensively and appropriately treat the RV-arterial uncoupling ultimately leading to right heart failure: through both reduction in afterload and an increase in contractility.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Katherine Kroner, Michael Patrick Gray, PHA

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66 net votes
75 up votes
9 down votes
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