Strategic Goal: Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

treating sleep apnea without a nose or facial mask

I am lucky to still be alive. I developed heart failure at 41. I turn 60 this month. For the last five years, doctors have tried to get me on a CPAP. I have told them that I'd rather die. I have absolutely no interest in sleeping with a darth vader mask or some strange thing strapped to my nose. Furthermore I had sinus surgery 30 years ago that only partiallly cleared my sinus passage. So forcing air up my nose is very ...more »

Submitted by (@chriscage)

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If my doctors are correct, patients like myself are at high-risk. Before we die, we will need expensive hospital or nursing home based care. If some one can develop a mask or device that will work, he or she will literally save lives and reduce the financial burden on families, communities and hospitals.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This shouldn't be difficult research. We're talking about an air delivery system, not a cure for cancer or AIDS. The challenge is that this is not a prestige issue. There won't be a lot of research centers spending on on this.

 

Yet it could save lives and reduce healthcare costs. Maybe this research could be conducted as a joint project of associations for ENT doctors, cardiologists and dentists.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mary Crystal Cage

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Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Health Disparities and Sleep

What is the role of health disparities in sleep and circadian health development?

Submitted by (@jcs500)

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Apnea

Does alteration of sleep duration improve patient outcomes in sleep apnea?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Role of sleep quality in critical care

Would improving sleep and circadian rhythms in the critical care setting result in improved patient outcomes (e.g., reduce severity of infection, duration of intubation, length of hospital stay)?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

DESIGN AND EVALUATE INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE SLEEP HEALTH AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Data indicate the association between short sleep and circadian disruption on a number of adverse outcomes such as cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, hypertension, etc. There is a need to move beyond association to interventions that can be shown to improve sleep duration and circadian disruption.

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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As described, we need to move beyond association to intervention. We have developing mobile technologies to assess outcomes in subjects living in their normal circumstances. The issue is what interventions can be applied and be shown to work to address both sleep length and circadian timing of sleep. There is a need to stimulate research to assess different potential interventions to see which are the most effective.

 

The impact of this will be invaluable. We should be able to improve sleep and circadian health in the US population and thereby modifying this risk factor for development of chronic diseases.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

We have the relevant tools to do this. There are millions of Americans with short sleep and millions of Americans who have misplaced sleep in relation to their normal circadian rhythms. Thus, there is no shortage of subjects to recruit for this type of research. There is now a developing body of knowledge about techniques that can be applied to modifying behavior in other areas—weight loss, stopping smoking, etc. These techniques could be the basis of new interventions to improve sleep health.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

DEVELOPMENT OF A PERSONALIZED APPROACH TO SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is developing evidence of major individual differences in pathways to different common sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. Moreover, there is evidence of different clinical presentations of disease and different outcomes. For example, some subjects with obstructive sleep apnea who get excessive sleepiness while others do not. The latter are still at risk for other consequences of the disorder such ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

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There is a strong rationale for application of a personalized approach to sleep disorders. This requires approaching this question using multiple domains as in other areas of medicine—clinical features, physiological factors, application of the –omic approaches, genetics. The impact of this will be several:

 

a. A new way to classify sleep disorders.

b. Identification of subgroups of patients with apparently the same disorder who will have different outcomes of therapy.

c. Identification of subgroups of patients who will have different approaches to diagnosis.

d. Identification of subgroups of patients with apparently the same disorder who will have different therapeutic approaches.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

These sleep and circadian disorders are extremely common. There is a risk infrastructure for this type of research based on the large number of accredited sleep centers in the United States that could be used for subject recruitment and who can adopt similar techniques. There is also a rich set of data obtained from sleep studies that could be used to identify new patterns that reflect different subgroups of subjects. These studies need to be based on clinical populations of patients who present with the different disorders rather than on population-based cohorts.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Can Psychological Science Improve Weight Loss?

Will sensitivity to the psychological aspects of obesity, including lifestyle priorities and motivations, improve the efficacy of long-term effectiveness of weight loss and obesity prevention interventions?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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A primary focus on principles of psychology may result in significantly improved control of the obesity epidemic. Effective interventions could reduce the risk of diabetes, sleep apnea, and hypertension. This research could also affect clinical practice guidelines for weight loss and obesity treatment.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Psychological science has been successful in developing effective treatments for a number of conditions, including sleep disorders, depressive symptoms, anxiety and phobias. Many of the behavioral principles employed in such interventions (e.g., cognitive restructuring, motivational methods) could be translated for the prevention and treatment of obesity within a reasonable time frame. Additional attention should be directed to the needs of population subgroups in which obesity is most prevalent.

In their Viewpoint article on weight loss intervention research, Pagoto and Appelhans (JAMA, 2013, see attachment) question whether a continued focus on dietary factors in research on weight loss and obesity is warranted. Their commentary raises the importance of attention to the individual psychological characteristics that influence adherence to weight loss interventions rather than dietary composition.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Apnea - Diagnostic Test

The notion that in order to be treated with CPAP for sleep apnea you first must have a diagnostic test, which involves either a sleep laboratory or a home study, needs to be examined.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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This idea is far reaching and possibly ahead of the curve a bit but it represents a direction that the sleep apnea field eventually should explore. Consider developing a clinical diagnosis of sleep apnea based on clinical symptoms and exam findings and then randomized those patients meeting the definition to a trial of autocpap for 3 months or to a traditional evaluation (home diagnostic test then APAP) for 3 months. Close follow up is necessary but with wireless telephony now available for CPAP and estimates of AHI available through CPAP adherence downloads, this study is feasible. If such a case diagnosis of sleep apnea can be developed (and I believe it can), then many more patients may be able to be treated. This approach, if successful, would shake-up the field considerably and potentially opens up treatment to many more OSA sufferers.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Strategic Goal: Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

Much of the current clinical research on sleep and circadian research depends on cohorts designed for other purposes. While this has been helpful, such studies have limitations. These limitations are related to availability of in-depth phenotyping data and questions as to whether individuals identified in population studies are equivalent to those who present clinically with specific disorders. These concerns could ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

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Sleep and circadian disorders are extremely common. For many of these we know little about the natural history, whether different subgroups exist and effects of current therapies. Thus, developing specific registries for common sleep and circadian disorders would provide a basis for addressing these questions.

 

For some aspects, e.g., studies of inadequate sleep, impact of snoring and circadian disruption, would be facilitated by developing a specific sleep/circadian cohort with in-depth phenotyping. This strategy has worked extremely well in other areas, e.g., cardiovascular disease. The lack of this type of cohort for sleep and circadian disorders is a barrier to progress in this area. The high prevalence of these disorders and their known public health significance argue that development of such a cohort would be a game changer and accelerate progress in this new area of medicine.

 

Such a cohort could address several compelling questions:

 

a. What is the natural history of short sleep across the lifespan?

b. What is the impact of snoring? Does it lead, as has been proposed, to vibration injury to carotid arteries with accelerated vessel wall damage?

c. Are there different subtypes of individuals with the different sleep and circadian disorders?

d. What is the natural history of shift-workers and what types of shifts lead to increased risk for cardiovascular disease?

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Problems with sleep and circadian rhythm and the relevant disorders are common. There are multiple accredited sleep centers for clinical purposes in the United Sates. They use common phenotyping platforms that could be the basis of some aspects of addressing this critical challenge. Moreover, most CTSA programs have a sleep study component. There are patient support groups for sleep apnea, insomnia, restless legs syndrome and narcolepsy. Thus, these groups could be marshaled to help in this effort. There is already a Sleep Research Network that was founded by the field itself. It is currently based on volunteer effort and there are no resources to support it. It could be the basis for future activities in this area.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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Strategic Goal: Goal 1: Promote Human Health

ELUCIDATING BASIC MECHANISMS OF SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION ON HEALTH THROUGH THE LIFESPAN

There are developing data from clinical studies that sleep deficiency and circadian disruption have multiple adverse consequences for health. The clinical data provide the base for mechanistic studies. Studies in animal models indicate that both circadian disruption and insufficient sleep later gene expression in peripheral tissues. Moreover, the effect of sleep loss in molecular changes in brain changes with age. ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

There is no doubt that insufficient sleep and circadian disruption are very common in our society. There are also compelling epidemiological data that they are associated with multiple adverse consequences, including increased cardiovascular disease, increase in metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance and for shift work an increased incidence of specific concern. Animal studies based on microarrays are showing that inadequate sleep and circadian rhythm alter gene expression not only in brain but also in peripheral tissues. These studies are hypothesis-generating and there are many opportunities for hypothesis-driven research in this area to assess mechanisms. Identifying mechanisms will allow investigators to begin to assess mechanisms of individual differences and to identify new pathways for intervention.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Sleep and circadian research is in a very strong position. Sleep and clock function has now been identified in all the major model systems—C. elegans, Aphysia, Drosophila, zebra-fish, mice, etc. Thus, there is a strong platform to assess conserved pathways for effect of sleep loss and circadian disruption. Moreover, microarray studies have identified likely pathways thereby setting up hypothesis-driven research. There are major opportunities in this area.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Maternal sleep apnea treatment effects

Does assessment and treatment of sleep apnea in pregnancy reduce the risk of maternal heart, lung and blood disease and complications associated with delivery and risk factors in offspring (e.g., obesity)?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

SLEEP DISORDERS AS A MODIFIABLE RISK FACTOR FOR CHRONIC DISEASE

There is developing evidence that sleep disorders, in particular obstructive sleep apnea and inadequate sleep, can influence the course of other chronic diseases. Observational studies show that CPAP treatment of patients with pre-diabetes who have OSA reduces the incidence of future diabetes. Moreover, animal and human data indicate that insufficient sleep and sleep apnea can affect the rate of progression of neurodegenerative ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This question will have considerable impact. Sleep apnea is an independent risk factor for insulin resistance. Moreover, observational studies show that treatment of OSA reduces the rate of future diabetes compared to that which occurs in untreated OSA. Therefore, identifying OSA and treating this could have a profound impact on reducing the rate of diabetes, i.e., a preventative strategy.

 

Both sleep loss and obstructive sleep apnea have also been shown to be risk factors for subsequent development of Alzheimer’s disease. This has been shown in mouse models and in epidemiological studies to address whether insufficient sleep and sleep apnea are independent risk factors for development of Alzheimer’s disease, in particular accelerating their onset. Determining whether this is so and whether interventions to treat these sleep disorders delay onset of diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease would have profound public health significance.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

These disorders are extremely common so that recruitment of subjects is not challenging. Moreover, new technology reduces protocol burden to assess individuals. All studies can be done in the patients’ home. There are existing cohort studies focused on diabetes and the Alzheimer’s Center program that could be used for these studies. Thus, the studies are extremely feasible in the near term.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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