Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Understanding of chronobiological systems

We know that all life functions are based on circadian and other rhythms; chronobiological systems are interdependent in intricate ways. Disturbances and disorders in one part of a system may affect other vital systems in unexpected but far-reaching ways. Many aspects of circadian rhythms and sleep-wake regulation in normal, healthy humans have been charted. Much of the knowledge thus gained is assumed to be valid also ...more »

Submitted by (@nma120)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Do our modern "traditional" sleep schedules defy nature?

Here's an interesting article which shows that the modern tradition of eight hours of unbroken sleep might actually be unnatural, and quite different from what our ancestors typically did: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-16964783 So, maybe the majority of our modern societies (even the people without recognized sleep disorders) are unwisely fighting against biology? Perhaps a lot of people's health issues, such as ...more »

Submitted by (@apollia112)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sleep Disorders and Brain Maturation

What is the effect of sleep disorders on child development? Specifically, how sleep apnea with intermittent hypoxia and or sleep deprivation alters the normal trajectory of maturation of brain regions controlling cognition, behavior and the cardiovascular system?

Submitted by (@raouf.amin)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

ESTABLISH NORMATIVE AGE- AND GENDER-SPECIFIC DATA FOR SLEEP DISRUPTION, SLEEP QUALITY AND CIRCADIAN TIMING

There is growing evidence that sleep durations are progressively declining in the United States. Moreover, sleep durations are different at different ages and in different ethnic groups. Currently definitions of normal are based on consensus since there is a lack of key data. Defining normal as with FEV1 is a critical step.

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Screening for SDB and Sleep Disorders in School-Aged Chidren by School Nurses

Can school nurses effectively screen for SDB and Sleep Disorders in school aged children? Who else in the school setting could provide such screening? Should such screening be limited to "at risk" children who display identified markers, or be open to all children? What is the role of teachers to "identify" children in need of such screening? What role will such screening serve to mitigate learning, behavioral, developmental ...more »

Submitted by (@nancyh.rothstein)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

HEALTH CARE DISPARITIES IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF COMMON SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is evidence of a higher prevalence of sleep and circadian disorders in different ethnic groups. This is true for both adult and pediatric subjects. There is also evidence that minority populations in lower socioeconomic groups do not seek evaluation for sleep disorders as frequently as other segments of our population. There is also evidence that they are less adherent to treatments such as nasal CPAP for obstructive ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

UNDERSTANDING SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS AT A BASIC MECHANISTIC LEVEL

We need to understand sleep and circadian disorders at a more mechanistic level. This applies to both the pathogenesis of these disorders and to their impact on health. New neurobiological and molecular tools facilitate this research. The focus needs to be not only in brain but also the impact of these disorders on future of peripheral organs. The elucidation of the fundamental functions of sleep and the impact of ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Elucidate the different causes of circadian disorders, and tailor the treatment to the cause

There are several possible physiological causes of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders (CRSWDs), including lack of sensitivity to light, over-sensitivity to light, deficiencies in the ipRGC cells of the retina, lack of melatonin production, long elimination time of melatonin, long intrinsic circadian period, differences in timing of sleep relative to internal circadian rhythms, differences in tolerance to phase mismatch, ...more »

Submitted by (@peter0)

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