Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Need to train and nurture more "translators"!

One of the major challenges in translating from bench-to-bedside and back is communication: the ability of basic and clinical scientists to understand each other's scientific language to be able to appreciate the importance of the other’s research questions and findings.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Having an increased number of researchers able to connect dots across the continuum of translational research should increase overall success of translation of ideas into health.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This requires "rearranging" of already existing elements. Within 5-10 years of running specifically designed re/cross -training programs, the effects might be widely visible.

Basic scientists usually do not keep up with the latest outcomes of important clinical studies, and thus might miss important starting points for new basic research (e.g., negative trials that suggest the need for new hypotheses). The great majority of clinical scientists do not attend basic scientific sessions because are turned off by the specialized (dense/obscure) scientific terms used. Those who are interested in being translators have a hard time integrating and surviving in the "opposite camp" (i.e., at many medical schools, basic scientists are expected to bring in all their salary in a clinical department, and clinicians get little protected time for basic research)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

22 net votes
39 up votes
17 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Training Programs Go Green

Training programs may consider a more green approach by producing easy to access on-line materials and resources to be shared with other training programs and trainees, with a common website repository where such information is archived.

Submitted by (@treva0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Analogous applications include the repositories for genome-wide data and results, and the PMCID repositories where publications using NIH support are stored. Archived information may include, e.g., training manuals and lectures (both PowerPoint presentation as well as audio-visual materials). Such a system would need a front end that describes the purpose and goals of the program for which the materials are developed, reference to the authors, copyright information (who has open access versus secured access), etc.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Treva Rice for the PRIDE (Programs to increase diversity among individuals engaged in health-related research): Joe GN “Skip” Garcia, Francisco Moreno Girardin Jean-Louis, Gbenga Ogedegbe, DC Rao, Victor Davila-Roman, Mohamed Boutjdir, Betty Pace, Juan Gonzales, Bettina M Beech, Keith Norris, Marino Bruce, Alicia Fernandez, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, and Margaret Handley.

Voting

0 net votes
6 up votes
6 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Transforming Clinical Practice through Patient-Centered Medical Nutrition and Lifestyle Education

The fact that diet contributes significantly to prevention and treatment of disease is now a foregone conclusion. National and international guidelines offer evidence based recommendations advocating nutrients, foods and eating patterns that are most closely associated with reduced risk. Patients assume that physicians are knowledgeable regarding the role of diet in health and that they are trained to counsel patients ...more »

Submitted by (@lvanhorn)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

AHA/ACC guidelines subsequent to the NHLBI ATPIII all provide diet-related recommendations for improving public health that, if followed, could offer tremendous benefits in reduced disability, death and health care costs. However, imperative to the implementation of these life-saving recommendations, is an informed and educated provider base that is skilled in: assessment of patients’ diets and eating behaviors, evaluation of possible risk factor contributors and initiation of diet counseling or referral to a qualified nutritionist.

 

Nowhere is the opportunity greater to assess, evaluate and offer guidance towards improvement of key diet behaviors than in primary care. Patients perceive physicians as credible, respected sources of nutrition counseling. Physician endorsement of diet and lifestyle change favorably influences patient adherence. Research to evaluate patient-centered medical education and training programs is needed to evaluate and compare patient perception, health impact and health outcomes of these translational nutrition efforts. Ultimately, the goal is to further calculate and quantify the economic and personal benefits that accompany these strategies in order to implement transformed medical education aimed at preventive strategies.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This is a major challenge due to current medical training focused on diagnosis and treatment rather than prevention. Research is needed to demonstrate cost/benefit of transformative education and training that shifts the focus from treatment to prevention. Successful outcomes can provide preliminary evidence needed to promote a paradigm shift across -medical schools and allied health professions with the ultimate goal of - improving medical practice and quality of life. Evidence is needed that documents patient-centered impact resulting from this training and actual practice. Proposed is a comprehensive, team science approach to testing the results of nutrition and lifestyle medicine in primary care and the biomedical, behavioral and economic impact derived from it.

This represents an ambitious task requiring an academic medical center environment that not only has the educational aspect in place but also the capacity to provide the translational effort at the bedside and in outpatient settings to allow measurement of results. It requires leadership in multiple arenas and coordination between education and clinical application that are crucial to successful implementation. It further requires leadership and expertise in big data, economics, biostatistics and the accompanying technology required to

assess, analyze and report all of the aspects and components inherent in a project of this magnitude.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Linda Van Horn, PhD, RD

Voting

3 net votes
7 up votes
4 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

What should mentors report?

There is a need to establish markers that are predictive of future trainee success.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Instructions to Mentors for K Awards and Sponsors for F awards for reporting on the progress of their trainees in RPPR non-competitive renewal applications are very general. Developing more specific criteria and rankings should better predict future stars. Having more explicit training criteria throughout the life of a program could improve the overall quality of the mentoring and the training within the program.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Five to ten years is sufficient time to track a representative sample of programs to develop criteria to be tested.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

-7 net votes
6 up votes
13 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Translational training programs

The strategic vision to enhance translation and to enhance the workforce both require training that spans the scope of basic science, pre-clinical development, clinical trials. We lack coherent mechanisms for training the next generation of translational researchers, some of whom may be MDs, and some PhDs. A program should provide cross-training of Clinical Fellows and Postdocs to reflect the needed interactions between ...more »

Submitted by (@wjones7)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The impact will trainees with more comprehensive exposure and involvement in translation of science from the bench to bedside. MDs will spend more time in labs or involved in pre-clinical work, PhDs will become CITI certified and assist with enrollment of clinical trials and trial design. Journal clubs will span the sciences, the clinical practice and the translational realm including regulatory and industry considerations. Trainees can use this background whether they go on in medicine, science, translation, or industry to fit and contribute to an increasingly translational medical bioscience field.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Feasibility must include a academic medicine environment active in translational biomedical science such that the mentors can include scientists, physicians and physician/scientists, some of whom are translators. Some of the scientists should be from industry and perhaps projects and funding can involve industry/Pharm as well these will benefit from an educated workforce. Challenges involve individuals at the sites putting the right teams together, but many Universities are doing this with incubators and translational units at present. This will further the clinical involvement to include Fellows in Fellowship programs in Cardiology, Medicine and Surgery.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Keith Jones

Voting

27 net votes
38 up votes
11 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Preparing for Transdisciplinary Research

There is a need to develop training programs, mentorship, and collaborations that cross boundaries and prepare researchers for future transdisciplinary needs.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

10 net votes
18 up votes
8 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Modernizing Research Training

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan:

 

Since the focus of research has changed over the past decade, training programs need to be encouraged to use newer models of research in their training and mentoring of potential research faculty.

Submitted by (@wheeze)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mitchell Grayson on behalf of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Voting

10 net votes
23 up votes
13 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Supporting early-stage investigators

How can we provide better support for junior investigators who are transitioning from K Award to R Award funding?

Submitted by (@ed.silverman)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

With the challenging NIH funding climate, many junior investigators are struggling to obtain their first R series grant. Without better support of our junior investigators, the next generation of investigators in academic medicine is in peril.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Edwin K. Silverman

Voting

281 net votes
313 up votes
32 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Expanding short term Junior Faculty Training Programs such as the Summer Training Programs for Junior Faculty (PRIDE): Focus

Expanding the base of the program foci (e.g. including NCI in addition to the current HLBS).

Submitted by (@treva0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Expanding the PRIDE program foci beyond NHLBI’s heart, lung, blood, and sleep foci, may involve a common-fund effort, for example by having multiple institutes involved in the program. It is well accepted that good research today is a collaborative effort that often reaches across institutes. For example, the research interests of several PRIDE/SIPID trainees were at the intersection of cardiology and areas such as cancer, diabetes and aging.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Treva Rice for the PRIDE (Programs to increase diversity among individuals engaged in health-related research): Joe GN “Skip” Garcia, Francisco Moreno Girardin Jean-Louis, Gbenga Ogedegbe, DC Rao, Victor Davila-Roman, Mohamed Boutjdir, Betty Pace, Juan Gonzales, Bettina M Beech, Keith Norris, Marino Bruce, Alicia Fernandez, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, and Margaret Handley.

Voting

10 net votes
14 up votes
4 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Expanding short term Junior Faculty Training Programs such as the Summer Training Programs for Junior Faculty (PRIDE): More Pgms

Expanding the training efforts (e.g. greater number of funded summer programs, extend training beyond 2 summers, provision for 5-year grants so an additional cohort can be included) would be highly beneficial.

Submitted by (@treva0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Expand training efforts by increasing number of programs. The PRIDE is now turning away outstanding applicants due to the limited number of training slots across the different program. Since each program is currently training as many scholars as is feasible given their current infrastructure and resources, a solution may include increasing the number of independent programs in the PRIDE or number of trainees a given program can support. This will lead to increasing the number of independent researchers in the health-related fields who come from diverse backgrounds. Flexibility to increase the training period: Some junior faculty need more assistance than others. Some trainees from less research-intensive institutions may have had fewer opportunities to participate in research and thus have less experience and fewer (sometimes no) publications. They would greatly benefit from an initial period dedicated to increasing core research skills and publications prior to proposing and seeking independent grant funds. In the long run, they will be more likely to succeed given the extended training since the PRIDE offers opportunities to collaborate with nationally known researchers and provides access to data resources and the possibility of increasing their publication record. Also, a small percentage of the slots may be reserved for repeat participation in structured manner that provides escalating levels of support.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Treva Rice for the PRIDE (Programs to increase diversity among individuals engaged in health-related research): Joe GN “Skip” Garcia, Francisco Moreno Girardin Jean-Louis, Gbenga Ogedegbe, DC Rao, Victor Davila-Roman, Mohamed Boutjdir, Betty Pace, Juan Gonzales, Bettina M Beech, Keith Norris, Marino Bruce, Alicia Fernandez, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, and Margaret Handley.

Voting

5 net votes
11 up votes
6 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

NOVEL APPROACHES TO TRAINING IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN RESEARCH

Sleep and circadian disorders are relatively new areas of medicine. Most universities currently lack a critical mass of investigators to develop institutional T32 grants. Thus, there are, unfortunately, few such programs nationally. The Sleep Research Society has recognized this and is taking active steps to facilitate development of other T32 institutional training grants. This will not, however, help the majority ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The current status of research training in sleep and circadian disorders suggest that new approaches are needed. The field has developed one multi-center training grant to bring training to different institutions. This is focused on genetic/genomic approaches. It is run by the University of Pennsylvania which has a well developed program in this area. The fellows in training are, however, at other institutions, i.e., Johns Hopkins, University of Michigan and Stanford. Web-based approaches are used for work-in-progress seminars, grant development workshops and group mentorship, and didactic lectures. This strategy could be used more broadly to develop research training in other areas of sleep and circadian research. Stimulating this would have a major impact on research training in this new field of medicine.

 

Another relevant strategy would be to encourage adding slots in a competitive way for sleep/circadian research to other existing institutional T32 grants.

 

There are multiple mechanisms in place to communicate opportunities to the sleep/circadian academic community, i.e., Sleep-L, administered by the National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; Sleep Research Society biweekly blog; the Sleep Research Network. Specific encouragement of this approach would broaden the base for research training and would be of high impact.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The field of sleep and circadian research has had a long commitment to facilitating research training. The Sleep Research Society has hosted Trainee Day at our annual meeting for 20 years. The Sleep Research Society is funding early-stage investigators through its Foundation. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine runs, in collaboration with the NHLBI, an event at NIH for early-stage investigators in clinical research. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine Foundation has a “Bridge to K Award” program that provides funds to early-stage investigators who just missed funding on their first application for a K award. The Sleep Research Society has provided travel funds for early-stage investigators to attend recent workshops held by different NIH Institutes including National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Thus, there is no doubt of the commitment of the field and its professional organizations.

 

The impact of these new initiatives would be to broaden the base for research training beyond a few institutions. The number of institutions with a critical mass of investigators to mount successful T32 institutional training grants is not sufficient to provide the necessary future biomedical research workforce in this area. Novel approaches, based on modern communication IT technology, are needed.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

Voting

142 net votes
209 up votes
67 down votes
Active

Strategic Goal: Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Enhancing T4 Implementation Research Expertise

We need to increase our base of T4 implementation research expertise among researchers, reviewers, and investigators.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Increase our base of expertise in a relatively new field. Increase the number of funded grants and projects that include T4 implementation research.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Additional training for T4 implementation research can be added to the training infrastructure currently in place at the NHLBI/NIH.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

Voting

-6 net votes
4 up votes
10 down votes
Active