Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Optimal hemoglobin threshold for transfusion in children with ARDS?

Do different hemoglobin transfusion thresholds alter outcomes in children with ARDS? What is the optimal *minimum* transfusion threshold for children with ARDS? What patient-centered outcomes can be affected by transfusion strategies: ventilator free days, time to organ function recovery, duration of intensive care stay, survival?

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society of Critical Care Medicine Executive Committee/Council

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Stem Cell Biology

There is a need to develop “designer platelets” and “designer red cells,” as well as facilitate large-scale production of these products for therapeutic and diagnostic use.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The reprogramming of adult stem cells has resulted in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can develop into any tissue of the body. These iPSCs ultimately may be used as a transplantable source of stem cells for a variety of hematologic diseases. Although this technology has enabled the generation of patient-specific or disease-specific stem cells that are also amenable to genetic manipulation, the major scientific hurdle has been the ability to create clinically meaningful functional blood products, including transplantable HSCs from differentiating iPSCs. The production of clinically functional blood products -- i.e. red blood cells derived from autologous iPSCs --could replace allogeneic products in highly immunized patients and the generation of megakaryocytes for patient-specific platelet production from iPSCs could drive significant progress in this area. Furthermore, disease-specific iPSCs could serve as targets for both drug development and drug screening in patients with rare hematologic disorders. In addition, support for scale-up and GMP processes, which are difficult to fund via the R01 mechanism will require specific grant opportunities tailored to infrastructure and process development.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Genomics in transfusion medicine

How can RBC genomics be utilized to improve outcomes with transfusion?

Submitted by (@barbarak)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Prevention of alloimmunization with transfusion

Improved understanding of RBC epitope diversity

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Utilize advances in genomics medicine to better understand impact of transfusion and to improve outcomes.

Limited donor pool, particularly in minority populations, presents challenges

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What new methods of platelet preparation, processing, and storage are needed for hemostasis in various clinical conditions?

The limitations of 5-day 22˚ C storage significantly impacts platelet availability. It is critical that we develop new methods of collection, processing, storage to extend the storage time of platelets, and evaluate the use of whole blood. The attributes of these products must be understood to optimally alignment product attributes, clinical efficacy and safety with hemostatic needs in a variety of clinical states. Specifically, ...more »

Submitted by (@bldbuddy)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Limitations of current storage methods challenge our ability to meet the increasing demands of cancer chemotherapy and complex surgeries as well as provide platelets to remote areas where trauma frequently occurs. Platelets are transfused to prevent or control bleeding without robust translational or clinical trial evidence of efficacy and safety. In patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia receiving chronic platelet transfusion predominantly for prophylaxis, post-transfusion increments, survival time, and durable hemostatic efficacy are important; however, platelet transfusion alone does not prevent bleeding. The overall state of hemostasis, the endothelium and donor characteristics that affect platelet quality may be important considerations in selecting the best platelet product tailored to individual patients. Better laboratory and clinical measures of platelet function, efficacy and safety are essential for best use of these limited resources. These outcomes should span and link in-vitro testing, animal models, and clinical effects such as thrombotic events, immune, hemostatic, and endothelial effects. Extrinsic, recipient factors (e.g., immune deficiency, platelet or endothelial dysfunction) and intrinsic factors (e.g., donor specific or platelet preparation) should be considered. Systematic analysis of recipients and donors should be broad and include considerations of glycomics, metabolomics, proteomics, genomics, in vivo microscopy, and advanced imaging.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Radiolabeled platelet recovery and survival methods are well established and feasible to perform at several centers within the US. Currently 4-6 million units of platelets and whole blood are transfused per year. It is very feasible to conduct clinical trials that compare methods of platelet preparation, processing, and storage in children and adults who require platelets for either prophylaxis or active bleeding. Multiple research networks that focus on both pediatric and adult transfusion medicine are motivated to perform the pre-clinical and clinical trials required to establish improved efficacy and safety of platelet-containing blood products.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Terry Gernsheimer, University of Washington, for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Transfusion strategies in pediatric and neonatal populations

What are the optimal strategies for transfusion of blood products in pediatric and neonatal population?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Blood is the most prescribed drug in the PICU, and 95% of all neonates are transfused during their stay in the NICU. Currently, there are no evidence-based guidelines for the optimal hemoglobin levels or platelet counts for these populations. There is a balance that must be achieved between hemostasis and thrombosis for this vulnerable population.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Clinical trials have begun to assess the optimal hemoglobin levels in neonates, but there are no trial to asses the optimal platelet count. Neonatologists, pediatric intensivists, and transfusion medicine physicians are beginning to come together to work on solutions to these problems.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Re-evaluating Hemoglobin Thresholds for Red Blood Cell Transfusion Decisions

Are there specific conditions where a liberal transfusion strategy results in lower 30-day mortality as compared to a restrictive transfusion strategy?

Submitted by (@nareg.roubinian)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

 Clinical trial data show that in multiple patient populations, a 7 to 8 g/dL hemoglobin threshold for red blood cell transfusion is safe. However, equipoise for transfusion thresholds persists in patients with ischemic heart disease and acute neurological conditions where a higher hemoglobin level may decrease ischemic injury to myocardial and cerebral tissues, respectively. Alternatively, liberal red blood cell transfusion may be associated with adverse outcomes such as pulmonary edema or increased rates of heart failure. In other populations, it is possible that even lower transfusion thresholds than 7 g/dL would be safely tolerated. On the other hand, if a 7 g/dL threshold is found to be superior to a lower threshold, this would establish a minimal appropriate threshold to initiate red blood cell transfusion.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Multicenter clinical trials that utilize markers of oxygen consumption are needed to answer these questions. A pilot study in patients with acute myocardial infarction demonstrated that recruitment was feasible for clinical scenarios in which equipoise exists. An international setting where the safety and availability of the blood supply remain significant issues may be best suited to answer the question of whether transfusion thresholds lower than 7 g/dL are safe.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Nareg Roubinian, MD and Naomi Luban, MD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Viscoelastic vs traditional coagulation tests as a guide to hemostatic treatments

Does the use of viscoelastic testing to guide plasma transfusion improve outcomes when compared to traditional coagulation testing?

Submitted by (@darylkor)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The PT/INR are frequently used to guide hemostatic interventions, particularly in the ICU where the risk for hemorrhage is increased. In part, this is the result of long standing misconceptions regarding the relationship between PT/INR values with in vivo coagulation factor concentrations and clinical coagulation or hemostasis. Indeed, this misinformation almost certainly contributes to the well-documented inappropriate use of plasma products. To this point, it has now been demonstrated in a variety of clinical settings that the PT/INR is often poorly predictive of clinical coagulopathy or peri-procedural bleeding complications.

 

The last decade has seen a resurgence of interest in viscoelastic tests as alternatives assessments of hemostasis and guides to blood component use. Indeed, a body of literature supports the potential value of these tests in specific clinical settings. However, the value of such testing strategies has not been well described in the setting of the intensive care unit. Ongoing equipoise regarding the optimal assessment of coagulation status in the ICU suggests that a well conducted trial in this domain would have the potential to be truly transformative.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The assessment of coagulation status and decisions related to plasma transfusion occurs multiple times throughout the day in essentially every intensive care unit across the US. Therefore, an adequately sized study population is clearly present and therefore, a multicenter trial is feasible with NHLBI support.

 

A potential challenge with a study evaluating the optimal coagulation testing strategy is the incomplete penetration of viscoelastic testing in current clinical practice raising concerns related to the resource and educational requirements if such a trial were pursued. Additionally, viscoelastic testing can take several forms, each of which may impose specific confounders. Therefore, specific technologies and transfusion algorithms would likely need to be employed.

 

Importantly, innovative trial designs may also help us to address some of the feasibility concerns noted above. One such design that may prove valuable in this setting is the stepped-wedge cluster randomization design. Implementation of such a design might be expected to improve investigator/clinician cooperation/compliance and may help reduce treatment group contamination.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Daryl J. Kor, MD and Walter H. Dzik, MD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Mitigating risks due to the RBC storage lesion and vulnerable patients

What are the underlying dependencies (genomic, metabolic, disease) in individual donors that either accelerate or delay the changes to red blood cells during refrigerated storage? What methods of preparation might protect patients from the risks posed by the accelerated degradation of RBCs provided by "poor storers"? What characteristics of individual patients make them particularly vulnerable to transfusion of red ...more »

Submitted by (@andrew.dunham)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The changes in red blood cells during refrigerated storage have been well documented and associated with negative clinical sequelae in the peer reviewed literature. While the impact of this so-called storage lesion does not impact every patient during every transfusion it is reasonable to expect that when a unit of blood is transfused to a particularly vulnerable patient from a donor that has red blood cells pre-disposed to degradation, stored in a manner that has allowed significant change to occur, the risk of a negative clinical sequelae is increased. In this case it will be important to understand what underlies the likelihood of a donors blood to store poorly, the changes that occur during storage that could impact vulnerable patients and design approaches to mitigate the degradation that could result.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

We believe mitigating the impact of the storage lesion is feasible by reducing and controlling the oxygen concentration in the RBC unit prior to refrigerated storage. We are continuing our development of a device to do this and to generate the data demonstrating the effect of deoxygenation and anaerobic storage.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Andrew Dunham

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Evidence-based, optimized transfusion practice

What are optimal transfusion practices for acute coronary syndrome?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Blood transfusion is the most commonly employed therapeutic procedure in the US affecting about 5 million patients per year. Having evidence-based transfusion practice guidelines would result in optimized clinical management of patients who need blood transfusions (red blood cells, platelets, plasma) whether for specific conditions (e.g., acute coronary syndromes, sickle cell disease, prenatally) or in specific age groups. Factors that need further evaluation include transfusion trigger in various patient populations, component type and volume transfused, storage age of blood products, patient blood management tools, donor factors that impact on product characteristics, and component processing and storage.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

It is increasingly being recognized that much of the transfusion practice has been empirical, without vigorous scientific evaluation, and thus should be evaluated and optimized. For example, it is not clear if patients with acute coronary syndrome would benefit more from a liberal than a more restrictive red blood cell transfusion strategy; and it is not clear whether plasma transfusion benefits patients with slightly elevated INR (international normalized ratios). Additionally, research capabilities both at the molecular level and at the population level have now made such scientific evaluations possible.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Goal-directed versus Fixed-ratio plasma resuscitation in surgical (non-trauma) hemorrhage

For surgical patients meeting criteria for the critical RBC administration threshold (CAT) due to an associated coagulation disorder, which hemostatic resuscitation strategy (goal-directed versus ratio-based) is superior?

Submitted by (@darylkor)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Perioperative hemorrhage remains a significant concern. Coagulopathy frequently develops in the setting of surgical hemorrhage and the optimal strategy for addressing this issue remains a matter of debate.

Military experience suggests the application of ratio-based plasma transfusion practices may improve clinical outcomes in the setting of massive hemorrhage. However, numerous concerns (e.g. survival bias, uniqueness of a military population, risk for adverse events related to high-volume plasma transfusion) preclude the broad generalization of such strategies to non-trauma surgical populations.

Goal-directed hemostatic resuscitation strategies (e.g. coagulation management based upon the results of hemostasis testing) have shown promise in specific surgical environments such as cardiac surgery and liver transplantation. However, definitive direct comparisons between goal-directed strategies and alternative approaches such as fixed-ratio plasma transfusion have not been performed. Moreover, the role of such strategies in more heterogeneous surgical populations remains uncertain. To better define the optimal approach to plasma transfusion strategies in the setting of intraoperative (non-trauma) hemorrhage, we propose a multicenter clinical trial directly comparing fixed-ratio and goal-directed plasma resuscitation strategies in the operating room environment.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Surgical patients with increased risk of hemorrhage may be targeted to improve subject recruitment (e.g. cardiac surgery, liver transplantation, aortic vascular surgery, multi-level instrumented spinal fusions or tumor resections, etc). Therefore, an adequately sized study population is likely to be present in a multicenter study and we believe such a trial would be feasible with NHLBI support.

 

To further enhance the feasibility of identifying a surgical population experiencing significant hemorrhage in a time-efficient manner, predictive algorithms such as the critical RBC administration threshold (CAT) could be also be employed.

 

The optimization of decisions related to plasma transfusion has the potential to improve not only clinical outcomes, but also healthcare resource utilization. Therefore, the outcomes of a trial in this domain could include both patient-important outcomes (e.g. mortality, bleeding complications), as well as outcomes related to healthcare utilization (e.g. total blood products consumed, hospital length of stay).

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Daryl J. Kor, MD and Walter H. Dzik, MD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Making It Real: Affordable Physiologically Relevant In Vitro Environments

We have done the best we can to mimic the human internal environment in vitro for the discovery, testing, and validation of therapeutics, but there is a critical need to do better. The use of more complex cell-based in vitro models is the result of the recognition of how little predictive power there is in current experimental conditions, even with animal models. With an in vitro environment that goes beyond temperature ...more »

Submitted by (@ahenn0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Physiologically relevant in vitro environments could potentially impact research on every tissue type, disease, and intervention, including transfusion-based treatments. Basic research, drug-testing, and translational medicine would all be fundamentally altered. Individualized medicine, cellular therapies, and regenerative medicine could all benefit from in vitro conditions that best support the care of the patient's cells and guide those cells in the direction needed for effective treatment.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Research and Industry are in the early stages of developing the techniques and know-how needed to address the technical challenges in establishing human-relevant in vitro environments. We already have the technology to control in vitro oxygen and other critical gas components. Mimicking cell-cell interactions and variable cell states such as states of differentiation or stress are areas under active research. Computational and analytical techniques are being developed that can gain insight from large data sets. More of a challenge may be assessing distant effects like metabolism of drugs by the liver or potential drug and cellular interactions with the external environment. However, making a human-predictive in vitro environment affordable is the challenge that could define success or failure of any particular approach. It is feasible within the next ten years to have truly predictive in vitro environments for drug cellular therapy development.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Hemostatic treatment with plasma versus 4-factor PCC in the critically ill

For patients in the ICU with coagulopathy and associated World Health Organization (WHO) grade 3 or 4 bleeding, which hemostatic therapy -- plasma versus 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrates -- is preferred?

Submitted by (@darylkor)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Bleeding is frequently encountered in the ICU and is associated with substantial morbidity and associated mortality. When bleeding occurs, coagulopathy is often present and the optimal coagulation factor management regimen remains a matter of debate. Traditionally (and presently in the US), plasma transfusion has been a cornerstone therapy for the replacement of coagulation factor content in this setting. Moreover, recent evidence supporting the use of plasma in the setting of trauma-related hemorrhage seems to have also generated a renewed enthusiasm for plasma transfusion in other critical care settings.

 

In many locations, there is interest in alternatives to plasma transfusion such as four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC4) for ICU patients with bleeding. In some locations, factor concentrates have entirely replaced plasma transfusion. However, evidence regarding the benefits and risks of PCC4 versus plasma in ICU patients is lacking. Therefore, we would aim to study the comparative efficacy and risks of a hemostatic strategy relying on PCC4 versus plasma for ICU patients with coagulopathy and bleeding.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Coagulopathy and associated bleeding are common in the intensive care unit environment. Therefore, we believe a multicenter clinical trial evaluating the knowledge gap identified above would be feasible with NHLBI support. Of note, due to the labeled contraindication of disseminated intravascular coagulation for PCC4, such patients would need to be excluded from this trial. Similarly, coagulation abnormalities resulting from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies for which there is a specific coagulation factor product available would also be excluded.

 

Notably, improved management of coagulopathic bleeding has the potential to impact both clinical outcomes and healthcare resource utilization. Therefore, the outcomes of a trial addressing this knowledge gap would include patient-important outcomes (e.g. mortality, length of hospital stay, bleeding, transfusion-related respiratory complications, thromboembolic complications) as well as outcomes related to healthcare utilization (e.g. product cost, total blood products consumed, interventions required to achieve hemostasis such as surgery or embolization).

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Daryl J. Kor, MD and Walter H. Dzik, MD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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