Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Preparing a Diverse Biomedical Technology Development Workforce

How do we best develop a scientific workforce that is fluent in product development and commercialization issues? How can NHLBI best expand the training opportunities for early career scientists to prepare them for entry into the dynamic biomedical workforce landscape? There is a need for scientifically-trained experts from diverse backgrounds who also understand business needs relevant to biomedical technology development, ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

A well-trained biomedical technology development workforce would enhance the quantity and quality of research translated from the lab to the market focused on heart, lung, blood, sleep indications. A better understanding of the product development pathway would improve efficiency and resource usage, and accelerate the time for products to reach the market. Structured training would better prepare academic scientists for industry collaboration and provide an industry-ready scientific workforce. Ensuring these training opportunities are inclusive of scientists from different backgrounds would increase the diversity of the biomedical technology development workforce.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Industry is a large employer of research trainees, and trainees are becoming increasingly vocal about their interest in opportunities to be trained in areas beyond the academic lab that would prepare them for roles in industry. NHLBI can leverage recently launched educational opportunities, including the BEST (Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training), NCAI (NIH Centers for Accelerated Innovations), REACH (Research Evaluation And Commercialization Hubs), and CTSA (Clinical and Translational Science Awards) programs.

Transitioning scientific discoveries to inventions and products to benefit public health requires knowledge and education beyond what is traditionally learned during medical, graduate, and post-doctoral training.

 

Challenges to addressing this CQ include:

 

• Need for educators and mentors with relevant industry experience and expertise.

 

• This would be a culture shift in academic institutions, though the new NIH programs described above has already started to influence this shift.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

scientific community in crisis- plans for stabilization

From my discussions with scientists at other universities and my own experience the scientific community is now in crisis akin to the recent crises in the housing and finance sectors. If not stabilized the damage is likely to be severe and long-lasting. The NIH/NHLBI as the vehicle for investment of the public's money in this enterprise has a responsibility to take IMMEDIATE action. My suggestions include 1) limit salary ...more »

Submitted by (@sfisher1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This could have a tremendous uplifting effect on the sagging morale in many scientists and departments.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This will require a much needed re-configuration of universities and how money is spent and invested at these institutions. The public trust and scientific communities should demand such changes.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : SF

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Economic and Sustainable Infrastructure for Basic Scientists and Physician Researchers in Healthcare Networks

This will require a new process of partnerships between successful basic scientists and the physician who is committed to a synergistic relationship with the investigators in order to unravel the pathophysiology of disease. The failure of the part-time “MD trainee scientist” due to increasing clinical requirements to complete their fellowship, has only reinforced the impression that physicians no longer belong in the ...more »

Submitted by (@dianenugent7)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

More emphasis and financial support is needed to encourage mentoring of physician scientists who can truly implement the translational breakthroughs in basic science laboratories. Thus far, we have not seen the support needed to maintain physicians-researchers in implementation of translational breakthroughs once they leave the lab or the coverage of their research funding. Not only a patient tragedy, this is occurring at the very moment that national expansion of genomic services for diagnosis, phenotype-genotype associations, and revolutionary pharmacological breakthroughs are occurring on a daily basis. Without a robust network of investigators linked to the basic science investigators, these NIH funded breakthroughs will languish due to lack of an affective network of implementation and supportive biologic investigations.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

How can this be accomplished? NHLBI should fund innovative and collaborative partnerships nurtured between physician scientists and the basic researchers that rewards grantees for the development of a novel hospital based infrastructure that promotes a healthy and vibrant synergism between patient centered care, research and innovation.

This is a great example where the physician scientist can provide the much needed link between the patient and the basic science that offers the promise of cure and improved outcomes for all patients.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Diane Nugent, MD and Hemostasis Thrombosis Research Society members

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Promoting Research Careers

Given the declining numbers of physician scientists, NHLBI should expand the portfolio of opportunities for junior faculty who may want to consider a career in research.

Submitted by (@golan0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Increase and Support Research Based Faculty

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan: There has been a decline in research-based faculty in the past few years.  The challenge is two-fold.  First, increase the research faculty pipeline with increased focus on training and recruitment of research focused fellows ...more »

Submitted by (@wheeze)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mitchell Grayson on behalf of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Enhancement of the Medical Home and Medical Community with the use of EMS providers

Traditionally the Health Care model has meant that patients come to HCF for their care. Hospitals are increasingly overcrowded and also not always the best place to be due to the risk for nosocomial infections. Utilizing existing community resources to enhance the health both acute and chronic deserves exploration at the national level. Training paramedics to do chronic disease monitoring as well as as remotely work with ...more »

Submitted by (@dayam0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

If we can train paramedics to go beyond simply responding to acute emergencies and add in chronic disease monitoring as well as management at home of common simple conditions, population health can be enhanced and costs reduced.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Pilot projects are needed. Need to work to reimburse these visits and address barriers that will occur due to concerns from others that already consider home health their territory like nurses. Would require some telemedicine support and development.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mohamud Daya

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

What Training Outcomes are Significant?

What trainee outcomes will best fulfill the mission of NHLBI, and what programs best promote these outcomes?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

A significant number of trainees do not become independent researchers but enter other career paths whose impact on the mission of NHLBI is unclear. A better understanding of the importance of these outcomes and the role of NHLBI-supported training in relation to our mission will inform the implementation and design of training strategies in the future.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

OER is rapidly implementing automated approaches to replace the manual tracking of trainees and their subsequent career paths. This effort should facilitate our ability to look specifically at NHLBI-supported programs.

 

 

Challenge: Obtaining and integrating outcome data that is not included in NIH databases or eRA Commons

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

What is the potential effect of the burden of COPD on the US workforce?

COPD currently affects approximately 25 million individuals in the US alone, many of whom are of working age, according to the most recent BFRSS data. Many of those people are encouraged by their doctors or families to apply for disability and receive it, even though there are still jobs they could do. This is going to have an impact on business and industry as these people who are at the peak of their careers leave. ...more »

Submitted by (@jmrommes)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

I think if this question were answered and that industry understood the impact of COPD on the potential workforce going forward, there would be significant interest from business and industry to do several things:

prevent COPD; develop accommodations that would allow people with COPD to continue to work; reduce the burden to both industry and individuals with COPD by allowing them to continue to work and produce until planned retirement.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This would not be a difficult question to answer. More difficult would be the education of both individuals and business and industry in how to accommodate people with COPD so they can continue to work until their planned retirement. Techniques and strategies could be developed, however, benefiting both business and the individual.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Jean M. Rommes

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Challenges in attracting students to research careers

What are the best methods for NHLBI to contribute to reforms that make careers more attractive to people from disadvantaged backgrounds?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

It would potentially increase the diversity of the biomedical research workforce.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Yes, it is feasible, but systemic reform is always challenging.

Pursuing a biomedical research career often involves 5–8 years of graduate education earning very low income (and suffering high opportunity costs), post-doc positions that pay less than some entry-level jobs with an undergraduate degree, and significant career uncertainty (as revealed by the work of Michael Teitelbaum (http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10208.html) and other scholars who have studied the scientific workforce). An undergraduate degree holder contemplating alternative options, such as simply taking a job or pursuing an MBA or a clinical career (MD, PA, physical therapist, etc.), would likely recognize that obtaining a PhD in biomedical science, compared to these alternative options, involves significantly lower lifetime earnings (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK36349/), more deferment of adult milestones, and less career stability. Students from disadvantaged backgrounds may be especially wary of careers that present continued financial struggle and uncertainty. Proposals to modestly increase post-doc pay (from its current $42,000) and to favor training grants over research grants (http://www.pnas.org/content/111/16/5773.full.pdf+html) seem unlikely to change the financial calculus: that pursuing these careers is often a bad financial deal.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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33 up votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Credible Data and Analysis of the Biomedical Research Workforce

There is a need for sensible policies that require collection and scientific analysis of credible data relating to the biomedical workforce. The data currently available are weak – for example no one knows, to a factor of 2X, the actual number of postdocs in the United States. The absence of credible human resource and labor market data on the biomedical research workforce is very surprising. NIH could contribute greatly ...more »

Submitted by (@teitelbaum)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

NIH has begun to develop its own capacity for such data collection and analysis, a very positive step. In addition, NIH may wish to consider modest research grant funding for research on the biomedical workforce by academic labor economists.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Michael S. Teitelbaum

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Using virtual learning technologies for workforce development

How can we harness virtual learning technologies to address the competency development needs of the modern and future biomedical workforce? Virtual learning tools, e.g. immersive learning simulations and serious games, offer tremendous possibilities for creating engaging and compelling learning experiences for biomedical scientists and providing them with opportunities to practice research skills within the context of ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Virtual learning technologies have been successfully used to promote workforce competency development in a variety of fields including defense, business, and surgery, particularly in areas that require higher-order cognitive skills, such as critical thinking, problem solving, decision making by simulating the real-life situations and conditions under which these skills are developed. We believe that significant improvements can be achieved in the overall preparedness of the biomedical workforce through the use of flexible virtual training and education tools that can help address the critical competency areas that have the most impact on research success. For instance, considering the team-based nature of most biomedical research efforts requiring effective communication and collaboration of experts from different fields, new workforce development approaches must be grounded in team science. Virtual learning environments provide an excellent opportunity to practice effective teamwork skills within the context of realistic scenarios, virtual and live character interactions, and structured reflection/debriefing exercises. Similarly, harnessing the power of virtual learning tools to train up-and-coming biomedical scientists to think through scientific and organizational challenges in a disciplined yet creative way, leveraging evidence from decades of research on decision making, would help accelerate the expertise development process of a new generation of biomedical researchers

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Virtual learning tools represent a powerful mechanism for activating the principles of problem-based learning and experiential learning through anchored instruction, meaningful contextualization, active participation, intrinsic motivation, and continuous assessment. While there is a growing interest in bringing virtual learning tools to the biomedical science domain, this area remains relatively untapped and calls to advance an understanding of how particular types of instructional strategies and virtual learning tools/resources compare in terms of promoting target competencies, behaviors, and research outcomes in real life, i.e. the learning transfer. This remains a challenge considering the lack of funding opportunities available to explore not only the feasibility of bringing these tools to the biomedical sciences domain but also examining the sustaining effects of the novel training and education interventions going forward. We feel that NHLBI is better positioned than ma ny other NIH entities to address this challenge and spearhead the learning innovation efforts for the biomedical research workforce, as it reaches across a very diverse community of biomedical scientists who need to work together effectively and efficiently to solve the most pressing biomedical and healthcare challenges we face today.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Anya Andrews, Ph.D., PMP, Director of Research Initiatives, Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

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