Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@rlevine)

The need for funding priorities and emphasis on valve disease and large-animal preclinical studies

Investigators need NHLBI support for programs that transform our approach to heart valve disease to mechanism-based prevention with large-animal preclinical studies through: an NHLBI-sponsored sponsored Heart Valve Network; development of models of genetic and acquired valve disease; a study section devoted to valve disease; and RFAs and RFPs based on Task Force priorities in mitral valve disease.

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@societyforvascularsurgery)

Animal models of vascular diseases

How can we better model human vascular disease in all its complexity?

­This is key to more effective translation of both diagnostics and therapeutics. Develop improved animal models of vascular diseases including PAD, aneurysm, venous diseases, to facilitate fundamental research and preclinical development.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@pandrea)

Interactions between anticoagulant therapy and antiretroviral drugs

Cardiovascular pathology has become a major problem in the management of the HIV-infected patient during the ART era. A large number of HIV patients will receive anticoagulants drugs for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. It is therefore critical to understand the interactions between antiretroviral therapy and anticoagulant therapy to safely treat HIV patients.

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@rwise0)

Animal Models for COPD -- Core Facilities

COPD is a major health problem with more than 140,000 deaths per year and yet there is a relative paucity of treatments that might modify the course of this disease. In part, this is due to the poor efficiency of animal models that require months of exposure to cigarette smoke. Moreover, there are no well validated small animal models of chronic mucus hypersecretion. Funding of core facilities that could both provide ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@swigrisj)

Challenge

Genetic or biologic makers that predict outcomes in pulmonary fibrosis are needed.

Validated animal models of lung fibrosis that better resemble the human condition are needed to speed up the drug development process.

An international patient registry is needed to help promote understanding of the natural history of pulmonary fibrosis and real-world impacts of interventions.

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@dkagr0)

Funding for synthesis and screening of potentially therapeutic molecules

Currently, there are limited, if none, funding resources to synthesize and screen potentially therapeutic molecules, based on supportive findings in cells, biopsy tissues from the patients with the disease in question, and the preliminary data to support the development of a series of compounds to screen them for their pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, toxicity and use in clinically-relevant large animal models.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@gabrielegrunig)

New analysis methods for research using animal models

The idea that 'animal models can faithfully predict the outcomes in human clinical trials of new medicines and treatments' is highly compelling. However, due to differences (biological and non-biological) between humans and animals this goal can likely not be achieved. Not only are animals genetically different from humans, everything else is different too. Even if living quarters are shared (e.g. house pet animals), ...more »

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

The CRISPER-Cas challenge: Need to re-phenotype KO animals?

Because traditional knock out models and CRISP/Cas models often show different phenotypes for the same gene deletion, do we need to re-phenotype hundreds/thousands of knock out animal models and revisit the conclusions of many studies based on using these animal models? This research may not appear very innovative but may be very important for drawing correct conclusions about gene functions and interactions - should ...more »

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