Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease

Do SCD patients with hemodynamics consistent with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) respond to medications designed to treat PAH?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

What is known about this topic:

1) Case series have demonstrated potential therapeutic benefits for endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors and prostacyclins in PH of SCD patients

2) Three attempted randomized placebo controlled trials of these agents in SCD patients have not gone to completion and, as a result, were under-powered to demonstrate efficacy.

3) Sildenafil produced an increase in hospitalization for pain crises in this population.

4) Anecdotally, select SCD patients with PAH have hemodynamic and clinical benefits from PAH medications.

5) Approximately ½ of PH in SCD patients have some degree of pulmonary venous hypertension and these medications may not be helpful here.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Areas of controversy:

1) Only one of the three randomized controlled trials required a PAH diagnosis prior to randomization, so the actual question hasn’t been properly addressed.

2) SCD patients with PAH are different than idiopathic PAH patients in terms of their underlying disease, so possibly the treatment response is different.

3) What are the right clinical trial endpoints for this population?

4) What is the role of SCD specific therapy (hydroxyurea, transfusions) in treating PAH of SCD?

5) How can investigators design a clinical trial which allows for enough patient accrual to achieve its endpoints?

6) What novel therapies can be developed to treat this population?

7) What unrecognized medication toxicities are SCD patients at increased risk for?

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease - Contribution of Airways Disease

What is the contribution of airways disease to acute and chronic pulmonary distress?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

What is known about this topic:

 

1) Pulmonary function testing is abnormal in 80-90% of kids and 90% of adults with SCD.

 

2) SCD kids with asthma have a higher frequency of ACS and those with a history of ACS have a higher prevalence of asthma.

 

3) An elevated TRV in SCD kids and adolescents may not predict mortality but does predict reduced exercise capacity at 22 months which may be irrespective of pulmonary hypertension

 

4) Dyspnea is extremely common in adults with SCD; 50% of HbSS and 40% of HbSC adults report at least mild dyspnea on exertion. The mechanisms responsible for this are unknown.

 

5) Bronchodilators are often used to treat patients with ACS, yet their benefit is unclear.

 

6) Systemic steroids will increase the rate of rebound pain if used during a vasoocclusive crisis.

 

7) Asthma in SCD is frequently under-treated because of fears associated with systemic and even inhaled corticosteroid use.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Areas of Controversy:

1) Is there an inter-relationship between airway and vascular disease in SCD?

 

2) Are systemic corticosteroids safe in SCD? Are they indicated in treatment of ACS? Are they indicated for treatment of asthma exacerbations?

 

3) Are inhaled corticosteroids useful in treating or preventing ACS?

 

4) What are the mechanisms responsible for the decline in exercise capacity observed as SCD patients go from late adolescence to early adulthood?

 

5) Will more aggressive treatment of asthma prevent this decline?

 

6) What role does nocturnal hypoxemia and OSA play in disease modulation of SCD?

 

7) What are the mechanisms of the restrictive physiology observed by PFTs primarily in adults?

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease

What are the risk factors and components of clinical course associated with progression to restrictive lung disease, and what approaches to treatment can limit this progression?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

RLD is a major risk factor for death in adults, but there is minimal knowledge of the sequelae of contributing factors. There is no longitudinal study to demonstrate the risk factors, determinants, biological. A cross sectional study of adults could determine prevalence of lung function abnormalities, obstructive and restrictive, using standardized testing and understand the factors associated with the presence of these abnormalities. This study could be associated with a clinical trial of treatment of RLD with outcomes of symptom reduction as well as improvement of the restriction.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease

Does screening for pulmonary hypertension (PH) of sickle cell disease (SCD) alter disease outcomes?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

What is known about this topic:

1) An elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) by echocardiography occurs in 1/3 of HbSS adults, 10-25% of HbSC adults and 10-20% of HbSS adolescents.

 

2) An elevated TRV is associated with mortality risk in adults, but not children/adolescents

 

3) Epidemiologically, associations of an elevated TRV with markers of hemolysis and other disease complications (leg ulcers, priapism, proteinuria, etc.) exist.

 

4) Some patients with an elevated TRV have pulmonary hypertension but there is a high false positive rate.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Areas of controversy:

1) Does screening change outcomes? Currently, there is no established treatment for an elevated TRV. Are there either SCD related therapies (such as hydroxyurea) or treatments for disease associations (such as treatment for proteinuria) that change outcomes?

 

2) Does an elevated TRV predict an increased risk of venous thromboembolic disease, obstructive sleep apnea, asthma or other pulmonary diseases with established treatment?

 

3) What are the implications of an elevated TRV in the pediatric/adolescent population?

 

4) If screening is beneficial, what is the optimal frequency?

 

5) What is the best method of screening and what role does newer technologies such as genomics and proteomics play in identifying a higher risk group for whom screening would be more advantageous?

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Risk factors and treatment options for pulmonary hypertension in Sickle Cell Disease

What are the risk factors and treatment options for pulmonary hypertension related to diastolic dysfunction in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

What is known about this topic:

 

1) Pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) related primarily to left ventricular diastolic dysfunction accounts for at least 50% of cases of PH in SCD patients.

 

2) PVH is an independent risk factor for mortality

 

3) Etiology of diastolic dysfunction in this population is unknown as well as the contribution of relative systemic hypertension

 

4) No specific therapies exist for this condition although traditional diastolic dysfunction CHF are at times eomployed. No standard of care exists.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Areas of Controversy:

 

1) What role, if any, does iron chelation play in disease prevention?

 

2) What role does treatment of systemic hypertension play in prevention and treatment?

 

3) Is obstructive sleep apnea a risk factor for diastolic dysfunction in this population?

 

4) Is there increased risk of VTE in this population?

 

5) Are SCD specific therapies (hydroxyurea, transfusions) beneficial in improving outcomes?

 

6) What is the best means of diagnosing PVH of SCD? Are there ways non-invasively to predict PAH vs PVH in this population?

 

7) Is cardiac MRI superior to echocardiography in evaluating diastolic function in this patient population?

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) and Sickle Cell Disease

What role does venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) play as a disease modulator in Sickle Cell Disease?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

What is known about this topic:

 

1) SCD is a hypercoagulable state; patients are at increased risk for VTE compared with African American controls.

 

2) Abnormalities in the coagulation system exist in SCD patients

 

3) Increased platelet activation occurs in SCD patients with an elevated TRV, but it is not clear if patients with an elevated TRV or PH have an increased incidence of VTE.

 

4) Increased risk of ischemic strokes in this population supports the notion that thrombosis is a disease modulator

 

5) Autopsy specimens of the lungs from SCD patients reveal a thrombotic arteriopathy.

 

6) Acute pulmonary embolism can be a trigger of the acute chest syndrome (ACS).

 

7) In addition to ischemic risks, SCD patients are at increased risk for hemorrhage particularly of the cerebral and retinal vasculature.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Areas of controversy:

1) What is the diagnostic modality of choice for acute and chronic VTE in the SCD population? V/Q scans are notoriously abnormal and often difficult to interpret, and there is a historic (but not clinically substantiated) fear of CT/A grams in these patients due to a fear that IV contrast will promote sickling.

 

2) Does VTE occur in ACS or are these all bone marrow/fat emboli?

 

3) What role do platelets play in the endothelial dysfunction of SCD?

 

4) What is the appropriate length of time for anti-coagulation after a first VTE?

 

5) What are indications for lifelong anti-coagulation in SCD patients?

 

6) What is the role of VTE in SCD patients with PH? Do these patients have an increased prevalence of VTE and are there outcome benefits for anti-coagulation in those with and without a history of VTE?

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease

What is the effectiveness and safety of treatment of the co-morbid condition of asthma with medications known to improve asthma outcomes in individuals without SCD?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

We and others have demonstrated that a doctor diagnosis of asthma is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in those with SCD. While doctor diagnosis of asthma is the issue for children, wheezing symptoms even without a diagnosis is the risk factor for adults.

 

This suggests either that asthma is under diagnosed in adults or that the disease patterns shifts from childhood to adulthood.

 

Making a diagnosis of asthma in individuals with SCD is difficult, as SCD by itself causes respiratory symptoms that can be similar to asthma in general populations, but diagnostic criteria are being proposed. There is concern about the value of treatment of the co-morbid of asthma in prevention of symptoms and even more so in reducing morbidity of pain and ACS episodes. There is also concern with regard to the potential side effects of inhaled corticosteroids by themselves increasing pain episodes and also having adverse effects on bone density, which can be affected by SCD itself.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : ATS Member

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Should Allogeneic stem cell transplantation be considered as an upfront treatment in high risk double hit DLBCL?

Double-hit lymphomas (DHL’s) are high-grade B-cell lymphomas characterized by chromosomal rearrangements of MYC gene with BCL2 and less commonly, BCL6.Large analysis of patients with de novo DLBCL have shown that conventional chemotherapy does not improve the survival of DHL Aggressive upfront chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has become a standard treatment in eligible patients. Retrospective ...more »

Submitted by (@shahram.mori.md)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

There are currently no recommendations regarding upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation of high-risk DHL patients in CR. Harnessing graft versus lymphoma activity may be a potential strategy to improve responses in such patients

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The challenge of this question is the definition of DHL. FISH is commonly used to characterize DHL’s but may miss a significant portion of patients with aggressive disease. Including the cohort DLBCL patients identified by IHC expands the number of patients. Majority of patients with DHL are older but the ability to perform reduced-intensity and haploidentical -transplants will increase the number of eligible patients. The use of post-transplant therapies is needed to keep the lymphoma in check while graft versus lymphoma responses take effect.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Shahram Mori

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Improving Community-Based Care for Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell treatment centers are located throughout the United States, primarily in urban areas, and play an invaluable role. However, there is a critical need to identify and educate primary care providers who can provide routine and preventive care, but will also know when to consult with/refer to hematologists and other appropriate providers when necessary.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

For the first time, comprehensive guidelines addressing the management of sickle cell disease were issued in 2014 by the NHLBI. (Previous guidelines were not comprehensive.) The 2014 guidelines, which address issues such as health maintenance and the treatment of acute and chronic complications, are based on a systematic review of available evidence; consensus of an expert panel; and published, vetted guidelines by other organizations when evidence was unavailable or insufficient. These guidelines can provide a solid overview of the knowledge essential for the care of people with sickle cell disease.

 

Identifying primary care providers who can provide routine and preventive care but at the same time are knowledgeable about sickle cell disease, should be a more efficient, less costly method of provide important health services to people with sickle cell disease and should ultimately improve the health and well being of this population, particularly for people who do not live near a sickle cell center.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Addressing this question is very feasible. However, for a variety of reasons, including misconceptions about patients with the condition, it may be challenging to recruit large numbers of primary care providers.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : The Sickle Cell Association of New Jersey

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Disease Severity Biomarkers for Sickle Cell Disease

Can we identify biomarkers that can predict sickle cell disease severity?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Identifying reliable biomarkers that can predict severity of sickle cell disease could help doctors and patients make better decisions about a wide range of clinical decisions, including weighing the risks vs. benefits of bone marrow transplantation, chemotherapeutic manipulation of Hb F level, and gene therapy, all of which have potentially life-threatening complications.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Scientific advances make it feasible to identify biomarkers of disease severity. However, identifying biomarkers with good sensitivity and specificity is likely to be a challenge.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : The Sickle Cell Association of New Jersey

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Implications of Sickle Cell Trait

What are the healthcare implications of sickle cell trait?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Millions of people in the U.S and throughout the world have sickle cell trait, yet other than its impact on athletes and the recent finding that it may significantly raise the risk of chronic kidney disease, little is known about the trait’s effect on the health of those who carry it. Additional research is needed to further elucidate the implications of sickle cell trait alone, in combination with other genetic tendencies or in response to certain environmental factors. Findings can be used to provide evidence-based clinical guidance for the millions of people who may be affected

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Addressing this question is feasible. Obtaining sufficient long-term data to answer these questions may be challenging.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : The Sickle Cell Association of New Jersey

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Identifying Epistatic Genes in Sickle Cell Disease

What genes are involved in the modulation of phenotype in sickle cell disease?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The pathophysiology of sickle cell disease results from cellular defects caused directly by the Hb S mutation interacting with the environment and many other gene products—some known, but most yet unidentified–a typical example of epistasis. How normal tissue perfusion is interrupted is complex and why the phenotype of sickle cell disease differs from patient to patient is poorly understood. Answers to this question will provide additional insight into their biological and functional relationships.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Scientific advances make it feasible to identify additional epistatic genes, which will provide additional insight into their biological and functional relationships.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : The Sickle Cell Association of New Jersey

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