Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Mitigating risks due to the RBC storage lesion and vulnerable patients

What are the underlying dependencies (genomic, metabolic, disease) in individual donors that either accelerate or delay the changes to red blood cells during refrigerated storage? What methods of preparation might protect patients from the risks posed by the accelerated degradation of RBCs provided by "poor storers"? What characteristics of individual patients make them particularly vulnerable to transfusion of red ...more »

Submitted by (@andrew.dunham)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The changes in red blood cells during refrigerated storage have been well documented and associated with negative clinical sequelae in the peer reviewed literature. While the impact of this so-called storage lesion does not impact every patient during every transfusion it is reasonable to expect that when a unit of blood is transfused to a particularly vulnerable patient from a donor that has red blood cells pre-disposed to degradation, stored in a manner that has allowed significant change to occur, the risk of a negative clinical sequelae is increased. In this case it will be important to understand what underlies the likelihood of a donors blood to store poorly, the changes that occur during storage that could impact vulnerable patients and design approaches to mitigate the degradation that could result.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

We believe mitigating the impact of the storage lesion is feasible by reducing and controlling the oxygen concentration in the RBC unit prior to refrigerated storage. We are continuing our development of a device to do this and to generate the data demonstrating the effect of deoxygenation and anaerobic storage.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Andrew Dunham

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

How do Circulating Precursor Endothelial Cells contribute to newly formed vessels

Endothelial cells derive from cells in the bone marrow. Circulating precursor endothelial cells contribute to newly forming vessels.

Do Alk 1 and/or Endogln mutations affect the functions of these cells once they incorporate into growing vessels. These vessels then go on to form arteriovenous malformations

Submitted by (@mariannes.clancy)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Marianne Clancy MPA, Chris Hughes PhD

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Endoglin Regulates biolgy and signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells

Why loss of endoglin causes HHT is not known. Endoglin is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells.

What is the role of endogin on vascular smooth muscle cells and why its loss contributes to HHT and other vascular malformations

Submitted by (@mariannes.clancy)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Vascular smooth muscle cells wrap around arteries and control their diameter.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Marianne Clancy MPA, Chris Hughes PhD

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Human Lung Progenitor Cells, Lung Epithelial Differentiated iPSCs, and Therapeutics

What are the biological properties and key surface markers of human lung progenitor cells and lung epithelial differentiated iPSCs? How can these cell populations be targeted for therapeutic purposes, including regenerative therapy?

Submitted by (@skrenrich)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

To find specific medical therapies to treat the wide array of human vascular malformations and vascular tumors.

Vascular malformations and vascular tumors, together referred to as vascular anomalies, comprise a complex and wide array of diseases in which there is a fundamental disruption in blood and lymphatic vasculature. The lesions disrupt organ function, destroy tissue, cause bleeding, increase infections and can threaten life. At present, there are some medical therapies but none are specifically targeted to an underlying ...more »

Submitted by (@joyce.bischoff)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Deciphering the cellular and molecular basis of human vascular anomalies will have a critical impact for patients with these lesions and it will also have a broad, far-reaching impact on cardiovascular research because the mechanisms and insights learned from these specific vascular anomalies will teach us the fundamental rules that are needed, and must be followed, to build and maintain a stable functional vasculature in humans. This will have an impact on a variety of areas of research including regenerative medicine.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

With the enormous advances in next generations sequencing technologies, the time is ripe for a concerted push to find the gene mutations that cause human vascular malformations and vascular tumors, both the most common and the rare. Cellular models for human endothelial cells are vastly improved and far superior to murine endothelial models, making research on patient-derived cells highly feasible.

The challenges will be to develop animal models of the individual human vascular anomalies that reflect as closely as possible the critical and specific features of the vascular malformation or vascular tumor. Such animal models, as well as relevant cellular in vitro models, would then be ideal for screen drug libraries for ability to reverse or slow the formation of the malformation or tumor. Such drugs might then be candidates to test in pilot clinical trials.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Joyce Bischoff

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Regenerative Medicine 2.0 in Heart and Lung Research - Back to the Drawing Board

Stem cell therapies have been quite successful in hematologic disease but the outcomes of clinical studies using stem cells for cardiopulmonary disease have been rather modest. Explanations for this discrepancy such as the fact that our blood has a high rate of physiologic, endogenous turnover and regeneration whereas these processes occur at far lower rates in the heart and lung. Furthermore, hematopoietic stem cells ...more »

Submitted by (@jalees)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Some barriers to successfully implementing cardiopulmonary regeneration include the complex heterogeneous nature of the heart and lung.

 

Hematopoietic stem cells can give rise to all hematopoietic cells but the heart and lung appear to contain numerous pools of distinct regenerative stem and progenitor cells, many of which only regenerate a limited cell type in the respective organ. The approach of injecting one stem cell type that worked so well for hematopoietic stem cells is unlikely to work in the heart and lung.

 

We therefore need new approaches which combine multiple regenerative cell types and pathways in order to successfully repair and regenerate heart and lung tissues. These cell types will likely also require specific matrix cues since there are numerous, heterogeneous microenvironments in the heart and lung.

 

If we rethink our current approaches to regenerating the heart and lung and we use combined approaches in which multiple cell types and microevironments are concomitantly regenerated (ideally by large scale collaborations between laboratories), we are much more likely to achieve success.

 

This will represent a departure from the often practiced "Hey, let us inject our favorite cell" approach that worked so well in hematologic disease but these novel, combined approaches targeting multiple endogenous and/or exogenous regenerative cells could fundamentally change our ability to treat heart and lung disease.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Jalees Rehman

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Funding of Stem Cell/Lung Regeneration Research

How to "cure" a chronic, incurable disease - A potential giant step in saving the lives of many thousands of Americans, and potentially millions worldwide, who are afflicted with COPD, the third leading cause of death in the U.S. The financial effect of COPD in the United States alone is well over $50 billion per year. It is estimated that some 30 million Americans have COPD, which of course means that at least that ...more »

Submitted by (@jimandmarynelson)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

COPD is chronic and presently incurable. Although it sickens and disables nearly 30 million Americans, and kills 140,000 of them each year, the only "cure" is a lung transplant. Due to the scarcity of organ donors and the requirements that lungs be removed from the donor in a hospital setting, only about 1,400 lung transplants are performed in the Unites States each year. Unfortunately, transplants are fraught with complications, side effects, and potential rejections, and on the average, add only about 5 years to the life of the recipient. The best potential solution lies with the stem cell and lung regeneration research that is presently occurring at a few centers around the country. Ideally, the re-engineered lungs would be composed of the patient's own stem cells, eliminating a great many of the current transplant issues.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Research is presently in process on construction or reconstruction of human organs. There has been success in creating some of the simpler organs, such as the esophagus and bladder, and a Medical Center in Galveston has implanted re-engineered lung is a pig. As of my latest conversation with the lead Doctor on the project, results so far are promising.

There is general agreement among the researchers with whom I have communicated that we are between 5 and 20 years away from human trials of re-generated lungs using the patient's own stem cells, but more funding means more research which means more possibilities of the saving of lives.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Jim Nelson - COPD Foundation MASAC/CAC/BOARD Committee Member

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Biology of the intact alveolar wall – the new frontier in lung research

HOW DO WE STUDY THE BIOLOGY OF THE INTACT ALVEOLAR WALL IN THE CONTEXT OF LUNG DISEASE AND REPAIR?

Submitted by (@jb3900)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

SEE UPLOADED FILE

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

SEE UPLOADED FILE

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : JAHAR BHATTACHARYA

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Influence of the Gut Microbiome on Pulmonary Immunity in HIV-Infected Individuals

It has become increasingly clear that gut microbiota have a tremendous impact on human health and disease. While it is well known that commensal gut bacteria are crucial in maintaining immune homeostasis in the intestine, there is also evidence of indirect effects on the lung. Multiple studies have shown that alterations in gut microbiota can lead to severe defects in pulmonary immune responses and reduced ability to ...more »

Submitted by (@brent.palmer)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

HIV-infected individuals are at significant risk of developing and dying from infectious and non-infectious pulmonary complications. Alteration of gut microbiota have been shown to have dramatic effects on pulmonary immunity and severity of lung infections. For instance, multiple studies have indicated that probiotic treatment with certain Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains results in reduced incidence and severity of upper respiratory tract infections in children. Similarly, a recent study showed that treatment with the minimally absorbed antibiotic neomycin was associated with alterations in gut microbiota composition and concomitant reduced pulmonary immunity and the inability to control Influenza infection in mice. It was recently described that HIV infection is associated with a dramatic alteration in gut microbiota and that these changes persist with antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thus, it is important to understand how these alterations may effect lung immunity, since the majority of HIV-infected individuals develop pulmonary infections. Furthermore, gut microbiota contribute to development of non-infectious complications such as atherosclerosis, metabolic disease, obesity and diabetes. It is thus highly plausible that the gut microbiota may also play a role in the development of non-infectious complications of the lung such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension, the rates of which are elevated in HIV-infected individuals.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

A better understanding of how alterations in gut microbiota associated with HIV infection affects pulmonary infectious and noninfectious complication could lead to therapies to protect this “at risk” group. Furthermore, manipulation of the gut microbiota in HIV-infected individuals using pro- and/or pre-biotics, antibiotics or diet modification to a composition that is associated with increased pulmonary immunity, reduced infections and lung complications are all low risk therapeutic strategies that could substantially improve lung heath in these individuals.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Brent Palmer (NHLBI-INHALD group member) and Catherine Lozupone

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Increasing Regenerative Medical Strategies in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. Current PAH therapies mainly act of the vasoconstrictive component of the disease; however there is a widely accepted view that another contributor to the disease is an abnormal overgrowth of cells that line the pulmonary arteries, which ...more »

Submitted by (@michaelg)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

In the past twenty years, 12 PAH targeted-therapies have been approved by the FDA. This increase in disease state awareness and in the treatment armamentarium have contributed to an increase in average survival from 2.8 years to an estimated 8-10 years. However, current treatments primarily address the vasoconstrictive component of the disease and do not address the now accepted theory of post-apoptotic overgrowth of hyperproliferative cells of the pulmonary vessels. A number of circulating stem and progenitor cells, derived from the bone marrow, have been identified that could have roles in repair of the pulmonary vascular system when interacting with the quickly, abnormally growing cells in the lung vessels. Work in this area has been named as a future research opportunity in the NHLBI-ORDR Strategic Plan for Lung Vascular Research (Erzurum S, et al. 2010).

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Basic and translational research support is needed—including high-throughput approaches such as phage display and large-scale proteomic analysis—to better understand the relationship between circulating bone marrow-derived cells, lung-resident stem and progenitor cells, and endothelial cells of the pulmonary arterial system.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Pulmonary Hyeprtension Association, Michael Gray, Katie Kroner

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Can hair follicle stem cells be transformed into new cells or organs?

Dr. Cotsarelis of the Univ. of Pennsylvania identified the bulge area of the hair follicle, which is now thought to contain the hair's stem cells. These cells would seem to be readily available and unique to an individual person. Can further work be done to transform these cells into now only hair cells but other organ tissues?

Submitted by (@info00)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Do we yet know all of the Resident Cellular Components of the Human Lung?

The DLD, NHLBI workshops conducted and published (Reference 1, 2, 3) had as their purpose to stimulate research that would identify still obscure or novel cellular components of the human lung to determine cell function in promoting respiratory tract development and in health that contributes to disease, so that better therapy might result. With robust technologies now available, especially genomic advances, how much ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

To completely understand how the human lung responds and reacts to inhaled or aspirated particles, microbes, and environmental antigens, etc.; then initiates innate and/or acquired adaptive immunity; or creates a milieu wherein cancerous cells that have travelled to the lung can establish metastatic sites, we must identify, characterize through special phenotyping and cellular function, and isolate for ex vivo study the still understudied and unknown properties of a sizable number of the 40 resident cell types in the human lung.

 

Knowledge about all the resident cells in the human lung and their functions should enhance understanding of the respiratory tract in health and disease.

 

References:

1. Needs and opportunities for research in hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

Fink JN, et. al.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 April 1;171(7):792-8. Review.

 

2. The mysterious pulmonary brush cell: a cell in search of a function.

Reid L, et. al.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 July 1;172(7):136-9. Review.

3. Resident cellular components of the human lung: current knowledge and goals for research on cell phenotyping and function.

Franks TJ, et. al.

Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008 Sep 15;5(7):763-6. Doi: 10.1513/pats.200803-025HR.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Technologies seem available.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Herbert Y. Reynolds, M.D.

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