Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can the study of rare diseases inform our understanding of common diseases?

How can the study of rare diseases inform our understanding of common diseases?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Research Advocacy Committee, American Thoracic Society

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Animal models of vascular diseases

How can we better model human vascular disease in all its complexity?

­This is key to more effective translation of both diagnostics and therapeutics. Develop improved animal models of vascular diseases including PAD, aneurysm, venous diseases, to facilitate fundamental research and preclinical development.

Submitted by (@societyforvascularsurgery)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society for Vascular Surgery

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

In-Vitro Assays to Predict Clinical Response

How can NHLBI support studies that produce in-vitro assays to predict clinical response and ways to translate those results into patient therapies through novel clinical trials, including those for small patient populations and rare diseases?

Submitted by (@skrenrich)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

RFA on EC-cardiomyocyte interactions in the mechanisms and treatments of cardiovascular diseases

Often under recognized, the cardiac endothelial cells are highly abundant in the heart, and may have important roles in modulating cardiac function, besides simply serving as structural component of blood vessels. Evidences of ours and others have indicated an emerging role of cardiac endothelial cells signaling to cardiomyocytes to mediate important pathophysiological responses. Nonetheless, detailed mechanisms of ...more »

Submitted by (@hcai00)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Successfully addressing this question would no double reveal novel mechanisms and ways of monitoring treatment responses of cardiovascular disease, ultimately leading to novel drug targets, valuable biomarkers and extended new directions of basic research as well.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Tools of studying these cells are mostly available. Both adult cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells from the heart can be isolated and cultured, although cardiomyotyes need to used within 24 hrs and cannot be passaged. However successful preparation of these cells from WT and transgenic animals would permit co-culture experiments and mechanistic studies. These cells can also be studied using in-situ techniques either detecting molecular changes/events or dynamic interactions. Potential challenges would side in selective targeting of these cells, for example, either ECs or cardiomyocytes, once a potential therapeutic is in the testing. Nonetheless, PECAM-ab conjugated techniques have been employed to specifically deliver proteins to endothelial cells, so I am confident most of the challenges can be worked out, particularly within a RFA awardees group with frequent exchanges of ideas.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Hua Linda Cai, University of California Los Angeles

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Lack of Collaboration Across NIH Institutes

There are many significant questions in CVD prevention that cross the disciplines represented by the different institutes. For example, the obesity epidemic, poor nutrition, and physical inactivity are relevant to CVD, neurological disease, diabetes, and cancer. Tobacco use is directly relevant to cancer and CVD. Social determinants and disparities affect multiple diseases and outcomes. Reducing obesity will require interventions ...more »

Submitted by (@stephen.fortmann)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Two or more collaborating NIH Institutes could afford to fund creative projects that neither institute can afford alone.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

NIH Institutes have a long history of isolation from one another. This has undoubtedly suppressed creativity and interdisciplinary research. It is inherently bureaucratic and reflects poorly on science. As an outsider I can only speculate about how to address this issue, but it would be well worth some attention at the highest levels.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Stephen P. Fortmann

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Identification of autoantigens that elicit pathogenic immune responses in cardiovascular diseases

Pathogenic immune responses participate in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. However, the autoantigens and foreign antigens that elicit the pathogenic immune responses have been poorly identified. Currently, the regulatory mechanisms on immune responses associated with diseases got some attentions. But, without detailed characterizations of this wide spectrum of autoantigens and foreign antigens in patients ...more »

Submitted by (@xfyang)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

1) use peptide/protein based microarray to antibody autoimmune responses associated with each major cardiovascular diseases;

2) use MHC tetra-mers or similar techniques to characterize T cell autoimmune responses associated with each major cardiovascular diseases;

3) determine autoantigen repertoire changes in patients' responses to current therapies, especially therapies with immune modulating effects;

4) develop autoantigens-based immune therapies for clinical trials

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Professor Xiaofeng Yang, MD, PhD, Professor Hong Wang, MD, PhD, Professor Klaus Ley, MD

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fibrosis Across Organs: Bringing Together Investigators of Fibrosis of the Heart, Lungs and Bone Marrow

Fibrosis can affect essentially any tissue or organ, including the heart, lungs and bone marrow. Effective anti-fibrotic therapy has long been elusive, and transplantation has been the only therapy capable of restoring patient function as fibrotic diseases progress to organ failure. Although these diseases present clinically with organ-specific manifestations, they are now thought to share many common pathogenetic mechanisms. ...more »

Submitted by (@amtager)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

In the aggregate, diseases characterized by fibrosis have been estimated to account for up to 45% of developed world deaths. Fibrotic diseases addressed by the NHLBI include heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and myelofibrosis (MF), among many others. Each fibrotic disease represents an area of great unmet clinical need, as patients suffer and die with no or limited effective disease-modifying therapies. The impact of developing effective therapies for each of these diseases individually would be great; the impact of developing therapies effective for the entire class of fibrotic diseases across organs would truly be enormous. The clinical burden of HFpEF is staggering – more than 650,000 new patients are diagnosed with heart failure in the US each year, half with diastolic dysfunction. Although not as prevalent, IPF and MF are particularly lethal. IPF has a median survival of approximately three years. MF is arguably the most aggressive of the myeloproliferative disorders and is associated with significantly shortened survival. Although agents such as spironolactone have been unable to treat fibrosis in HFpEF as yet, two anti-fibrotic drugs, pirfenidone and nintedanib, have now been shown to slow progression of IPF, and the oral JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib has been shown to improve MF survival. These early successes underscore the great impact that developing effective anti-fibrotic therapies will have.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This challenge could be addressed by funding research efforts to identify and therapeutically target fundamental pathogenetic mechanisms shared by fibrotic diseases across organs. Although fibrotic diseases present clinically with organ-specific manifestations, there has been a growing appreciation of that these diseases share many aspects of their pathogenesis. Fibrosis In many of these diseases results from recurrent or non-resolving epithelial or endothelial injury, followed by over-exuberant or aberrant mesenchymal cell responses. Across all organs, these processes result in the pathologic accumulation of fibroblasts and extracellular matrix, with distortion of organ architecture and loss of organ function. Core pathways leading to epithelial and endothelial cell injury and senescence, to fibroblast accumulation and persistence, and to altered matrix biochemical and biomechanical properties, are now being identified. Therapeutics developed to target these core pathways could have broad clinical applicability. Funding initiatives aimed at better the characterization of core fibrotic pathways already identified, the identification of new core fibrotic pathways, and the development of therapies to target core fibrotic pathways, could allow the NHLBI to simultaneously and cost-effectively address the great unmet needs of the large patients with any of the many devastating fibrotic diseases that affect the heart, lungs and bone marrow.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Andrew M. Tager

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What about the impact of regulation of genes in response to external stimulation on human health

We are focusing a lot on the genes that may be protective or harmful to our lives. But what about the regulation of genes in response to external stimulations, such as psychosocial and/or environmental, that are probably more accountable for whether we live healthier or not.

Submitted by (@jiang001)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Rationale: Years of research in the mind-heart field have set examples that looking at changes during dynamic stimulations (chronic, acute, and acute superimposed on chronic) are more meaningful for us to better understand how the body truly works. Therefore, research design in mimicking real dynamic process is necessary to truly capture the healthy or harmful phenotypes driven by genotypes. I suggest the NHLBI to establish a platform gathering resources to promote more sophisticated research from basic to clinical to better understand the underlying mechanisms of psychosocial impact on cardiovascular diseases that has come to a sizable problem for the human being in US and world wide.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

We have performed researches that allow us to identify phenotypes that are only appearing under emotional stress testing. Currently we are examining whether certain intervention may modify these kinds of changes. Even our studies fail to demonstrate changes with intervention, the findings support future studies focusing on testing dynamic changes under stress that reflects daily living. Resting data obtained in laboratory does not truly represent what human beings experiences.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Wei Jiang from Duke University

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Relevance of cardiovascular disease associated with autoimmunity research

NIH estimates up to 23.5 million Americans suffer from autoimmune disease (AD) and up to 24 million from heart diseases. As a result, NIH and AHA estimates the annual direct health care costs for AD to be in the range of $100 billion and $200 billion for heart and stroke diseases. Yet this area of research has been neglected and underfunded. The proposition is for NHLBI to partner with other NIH institutes dealing with ...more »

Submitted by (@mboutjdir)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Reduce the impact of autoimmune diseases on the heart and vascular system.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Generate RFAs dedicated to the field of autoimmune associated cardiovascular diseases.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : M. Boutjdir

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Novel Mechanism for Clinical Trials of New Pro-Hemostatic Agents in Hemophilia

There are new exciting novel pro-hemostatic therapeutics in early phase clinical trials for hemophilia and hemophilia inhibitor patients. Yet, it is difficult to design randomized trials to compare these agents, or compare them with standard treatment, given the small sample size and competing studies for such patients. It is critical to develop novel approaches to compare new agents in rare populations. For example, ...more »

Submitted by (@ragni01)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Should rare disease-specific strategies for clinical trials be developed, it would revolutionize the approach to study of not only rare disease populations, but all disease groups, no matter their size. If validated, rare disease-specific clinical trial strategies, would potentially reduce the cost, time, patient burden, and research effort to conduct clinical trials. If validated, consideration could be given to drug licensure earlier in the trial process, with a requirement for all such trials to initiate and continue ongoing data collection post-licensure for safety and efficacy.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Novel statistical methodologies are greatly needed to help with rare disease research. NHLBI might consider a grant mechanism RFA to encourage development of novel clinical trial strategies utilizing smaller sample size. The proof would be to develop the methodology as part of a feasibility study, and then, if feasible, adapt the novel approach to development and conduct of a clinical trial in a rare disease clinical tria,l to test the concept.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Margaret V. Ragni, MD, MPH (aspects discussed with Don Brambilla PhD.

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Stem Cell Biology

There is a need to develop “designer platelets” and “designer red cells,” as well as facilitate large-scale production of these products for therapeutic and diagnostic use.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The reprogramming of adult stem cells has resulted in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can develop into any tissue of the body. These iPSCs ultimately may be used as a transplantable source of stem cells for a variety of hematologic diseases. Although this technology has enabled the generation of patient-specific or disease-specific stem cells that are also amenable to genetic manipulation, the major scientific hurdle has been the ability to create clinically meaningful functional blood products, including transplantable HSCs from differentiating iPSCs. The production of clinically functional blood products -- i.e. red blood cells derived from autologous iPSCs --could replace allogeneic products in highly immunized patients and the generation of megakaryocytes for patient-specific platelet production from iPSCs could drive significant progress in this area. Furthermore, disease-specific iPSCs could serve as targets for both drug development and drug screening in patients with rare hematologic disorders. In addition, support for scale-up and GMP processes, which are difficult to fund via the R01 mechanism will require specific grant opportunities tailored to infrastructure and process development.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Stem Cell Biology

There is a need to develop an artificial and functional hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche that allows for the expansion of repopulating HSCs.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Methods to expand hematopoietic stem cells have continued to be examined extensively because stem cell numbers in the graft are important for clinical outcomes following transplantation. These numbers are particularly relevant in umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation, where low numbers of stem cells are directly related to delayed hematopoietic and immune reconstitution. Improved HSC expansion strategies may significantly impact transplantation outcome, enabling broader applications beyond UCB transplantation. Furthermore, these strategies are also needed to realize the full therapeutic potential of genome editing technologies to correct hematopoietic stem cells derived from patients with hematologic disorders. Since efforts to expand HSCs in cytokine-supported liquid cultures have been largely unsuccessful, efficient expansion will require an appropriate context that is provided by the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Future studies must also evaluate how niche signals regulate stem cell function to optimize cell expansion, and proper humanized mouse models must be developed to help predict stem cell function and regulation by the niche.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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